Connect with us

Foreign

10,000 people join Greta Thunberg at Hamburg climate protest

Published

on

Around 10,000 people, on Friday joined Swedish climate activist, Greta Thunberg, at a protest in the Northern German city of Hamburg, based on police estimate.

The participants, who demanded better climate policies, displayed posters and banners with messages such as “We will strike until you take action” and “The earth is on fire.”

The event kicked off with a minute of silence for the victims of a deadly shooting spree in the city of Hanau.

Yavuz Feroglu, of the Kurdish umbrella organization Nav-Dem, said everybody was angry about the condition of climate worldwide.

Organizers estimated that 25,000 people took part in the protest, which was held by the Fridays for Future movement of schoolchildren and students.

It came two days before the Hamburg city-state holds an election and was attended by numerous politicians.

However, participants were due to march from the Heiligengeistfeld area in the city’s St Pauli District through the city centre. Thunberg was expected to give a speech at the end.

Almost exactly a year ago, the young activist took part in a climate strike in Hamburg for the first time. The largest climate strike in Hamburg to date had drawn around 70,000 people in Sept. 2019.

Edited By: Yahaya Isah/Felix Ajide

 

Foreign

‘The world is on fire,’ Greta Thunberg tells UK climate rally

Published

on

Greta Thunberg denounced politicians and the media on Friday for failing her generation, saying the world is on fire because they are ignoring a looming climate cataclysm.

Several thousand people attended a rally in the south-western English city of Bristol to see Thunberg, the teenage activist who has reprimanded governments across the world over climate change.

Known simply as Greta, 17-year-old Thunberg has captured the imagination of many young people with impassioned demands for world leaders to take urgent action.

“I will not be silenced while the world is on fire, will you?

“This emergency is being completely ignored by the politicians, the media and those in power.

“Basically nothing is being done in spite of all the beautiful words.”

“Change the politics not the climate.

“The ocean is rising so are we! And at this point education is pointless,” Thunberg said.

Thunberg rose to prominence when she starting missing lessons two years ago to protest outside the Swedish parliament building.

Since then, she has become the world’s most prominent climate activist.

She has repeatedly upbraided world leaders including U.S. President Donald Trump for ignoring the perils of climate change, though Trump has dismissed what he calls the climate “prophets of doom”.

“Our house is still on fire, Your inaction is fuelling the flames,” Thunberg told the World Economic Forum in Davos in January.

Thunberg has been in Britain since last weekend.

On Tuesday, she visited the University of Oxford, where she met Malala Yousafzai, the 22-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner and campaigner for girls’ education, who is studying there.

Thunberg called Yousafzai her role model, while Yousafzai said on Twitter: “She’s the only friend I’d skip school for.”

Edited By: Abiodun Oluleye/Emmanuel Yashim

Continue Reading

Foreign

Greta Thunberg to draw thousands at British climate rally

Published

on

Greta Thunberg, the teenage activist who has reprimanded governments across the world for failing her generation with climate change, is expected to draw a crowd of thousands on Friday when she leads a protest in Britain.

Known simply as Greta, 17-year-old Thunberg has captured the imagination of many young people with impassioned demands for world leaders to take urgent action to prevent what she says will be an environmental cataclysm.

She would address a “Youth Strike for Climate” rally in the English city of Bristol, though police issued a safety warning due to the number of people expected to attend.

“The world’s youth are waking up and taking action on the climate crisis,” said the event organisers.

The Bristol Youth Strike 4 Climate group, which insisted it had prepared properly and did not need to be “patronised” by safety worries.

The group is part of a global movement of school students who stage protests in school time over what they say is the lack of government action on climate change.

Report says Britain is targeting net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and wants to bring forward a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars to 2035 at the latest.

Organisers say they expect between 15,000 and 60,000 protesters from across the country to attend the event.

One coach company said it was providing transport from 13 places around Britain, including Oxford, Birmingham, Brighton and Cardiff.

Police and the local council in Bristol issued a joint statement, expressing safety concerns.

“We have seen a number of protests over the last year however this one will be significantly larger, please do not underestimate the scale of this protest.

“Police will close roads around the area where Thunberg, is expected to speak before she joins a march through the city,” it said.

However, Thunberg has been in Britain since the weekend.

On Tuesday she visited the University of Oxford, where she met Malala Yousafzai, the 22-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner and campaigner for girls’ education, who is studying there.

The pair shared photos of themselves with their arms around each other.

Thunberg called Yousafzai her role model, while Yousafzai said on Twitter: “She’s the only friend I’d skip school for.”

Thunberg started missing lessons two years ago to protest outside the Swedish parliament building.

She has since sparked a global movement calling for sustainability and awareness of climate change.

Edited By: Abiodun Oluleye/Ali Baba-Inuwa

Continue Reading

Foreign

Greta Thunberg protests with Sami youth in Northern Sweden

Published

on

Teen climate activist, Greta Thunberg, on Friday visited Northern Sweden to campaign for climate action alongside members of the indigenous Sami minority.

“Indigenous peoples all over the world are those who are initially and most affected.

“They also lead the fight and make the most resistance. The indigenous peoples are on the front line and we support them,” Thunberg said.

The protesters, who assembled on a frozen lake, had a banner with a text that read “Indigenous rights, Climate justice.”

The Arctic is warming at double the rate of the rest of the planet, leading to rapid loss of glacial and sea ice, and threatening traditional lifestyles for indigenous peoples like the Sami and Inuit.

According to Sanna Vannar, leader of Saminuorra, the Sami youth organization in Sweden, each Sami is affected by the climate crisis.

There are an estimated 20,000 to 35,000 Sami people in modern-day Sweden. Formerly known as Lapps, Sami people also live in Norway, Finland and Northern Russia.

Thunberg began a global movement to draw attention to climate change by skipping school on Fridays. She staged her first school strike in Aug. 2018.

Edited By: Yahaya Isah/Ali Baba-Inuwa

Continue Reading

Foreign

Greta Thunberg turns 17, back at Swedish parliament for protest

Published

on

Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg on Friday turned 17, however kept to her routine and stood outside parliament in Stockholm for her weekly protest.

“School strike week 72,” she tweeted, posting a photo of herself holding a hand-painted sign that read “school strike for climate.”

Thunberg staged her first school strike in August 2018.

Schools in the Swedish capital were still off for Christmas holidays.

In December 2019, she returned to Sweden after being away for four and a half months.

While away from Sweden, Thunberg has spoken at climate meetings from Switzerland to New York, and most recently addressed the UN Climate Conference in Madrid and a rally in Turin, Italy.

In December 2019, she was named Time magazine’s person of the year for her role in creating a global movement to draw attention to climate change by skipping school on Fridays.

Thunberg does not fly for environmental reasons and completed two trans-Atlantic voyages in 2019.

From New York, where she spoke at a UN climate summit, Thunberg attended other engagements in Montreal, Canada, and then travelled across the U.S. to Los Angeles.

Madrid took over as host city for the UN climate conference from Santiago, Chile, which was cancelled due to unrest in the South American country.

Edited by: Abiodun Oluleye

Continue Reading

Foreign

Australian PM dismisses criticism from Greta Thunberg

Published

on

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Monday dismissed criticism from Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg that he was not doing enough to combat climate change.

The 16-year-old activist, who has a global following, used Twitter to slam the Australian government for failing to make the connection between the climate crisis and extreme weather and disasters like the fires that have hit the country.

“Not even catastrophes like these seem to bring any political action.

“How is this possible?” Thunberg Tweeted.

However, Morrison, asked by newsmen about her message, said he would do what was right for Australia’s national interest.

“We’ll do in Australia what we think is right for Australia.

“I’m not here to try to impress people overseas,” Morrison said.

Earlier Monday, Morrison said that calls in Australia for him to do more to fight climate change in the face of the bushfire crisis were “reckless”.

He said that he would not be “panicked” into taking stronger action.

“We won’t embrace reckless targets and abandon traditional industries that would risk Australian jobs while having no meaningful impact on the global climate,” Morrison noted.

Morrison has long been a strong supporter of the coal industry which is Australia’s biggest export.

Report says three quarters of Australian coal production is exported and is worth 67 billion dollars (46.2 billion dollars) a year.

The Australian leader rejected a call from his deputy and leader of his National Party coalition partner, Michael McCormack, to do more to combat climate change.

“I never panic. I don’t think panicking is the way to manage anything,” Morrison said.

He said that he would not be intimidated by the push to do more to combat climate change which was “politically motivated.”

Edited by: Abiodun Oluleye/Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Climate activist Greta Thunberg wins ‘alternative Nobel prize’

Published

on

 Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg has been named as one of four winners of an award often called “the alternative Nobel prize.”

Thunberg was lauded “for inspiring and amplifying political demands for urgent climate action reflecting scientific facts,” the Stockholm-based Right Livelihood Award Foundation said.

In Aug. 2018, the 16-year-old began a “school strike” outside the Swedish parliament that inspired a youth-led movement that has staged climate strikes across the globe under the slogan Fridays for Future.

The Stockholm-based Right Livelihood Award Foundation said the jury considered 142 candidates from 59 different countries this year.

YEE

Edited by Emmanuel Yashim

Continue Reading

Foreign

Greta Thunberg helps kicks off youth climate summit at the UN

Published

on

 Swedish teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg helped kick off a youth climate summit at the United Nations in New York on Saturday, ahead of a key gathering of world leaders next week.

“Yesterday millions of people across the globe marched and demanded real climate action, especially young people.

“We  showedt that we are united and we young people are unstoppable,” Thunberg said.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres, who will host world leaders at on Monday at a major climate summit before the presidents and prime ministers begin days of speeches at the UN General Assembly, also took part in the youth summit, urging his generation to heed the voices of the youth.

Some 700 activists were taking part in the youth summit, where young people were sharing information about the negative consequences of climate change and what they were doing in their home countries.

A running theme is the idea that the youth will be most directly affected by climate change in the future, but they are not part of the decision-making process.

The youth summit kicked off a day after hundreds of thousands of people around the world took part in strikes to raise awareness for climate change and demand policy changes.

In New York, Thunberg joined tens of thousands for protests.

U.S. President Donald Trump is not expected to attend Monday’s summit. Trump in 2017 announced he was pulling the United States out of the Paris Agreement, a international deal to limit the world’s greenhouse gas emissions and slow global warming.

YEE

Edited by Emmanuel Yashim

Notepad

Continue Reading

Foreign

Teenage activist Greta takes climate campaign to the high seas

Published

on

With the wind in her hair and TV cameras pointing at her, Swedish teenager, Greta Thunberg, began a trans-Atlantic crossing in a racing yacht on Wednesday to further her campaign for stronger action against climate change.

The 16-year-old activist, who shot to global fame last year after she started missing school every Friday to demonstrate outside the Swedish parliament, is bound for New York, where she will take part in a United Nations climate summit.

Standing on a pontoon in a marina in Plymouth, southwest England, Thunberg gave a news conference in front of a throng of TV crews and photographers just before setting sail under a typically English grey sky on the 60-foot yacht Malizia II.

The vessel has been equipped with solar panels and underwater electricity turbines to ensure that it leaves no carbon footprint.

Conditions on board are Spartan, with no shower or toilet, and meals will consist of freeze-dried food.

Thunberg, who was wearing a black waterproof jacket emblazoned with the slogan “Unite Behind the Science”, was asked how she expected other people to travel across continents, given that not everyone could muster a racing yacht and crew.

“I am not telling anyone what to do or what not to do,’’ she responded.

“I am one of the very few people in the world, who actually can do this and I think I should take that chance.’’

She said that her voice was not heard at all when she first started campaigning on climate change issues and it was only after she started her school strikes and other teenagers began to emulate her that she made an impact.

This had convinced her of the value of creative forms of campaigning.

Having previously said it would be a waste of time for her to meet President Donald Trump, who has pulled the United States out of the Paris accord on limiting the effects of climate change, Thunberg was pressed on why she would not want to seize any chance to convince him or other sceptics.

“I’m not that special; I can’t convince everyone.

“Instead of speaking to me and to the school-striking children and teenagers, they should be talking to actual scientists and experts in this area,’’ she said.

“There are climate delayers who want to do everything to shift the focus from the climate crisis to something else or want to make people question the science.

“I’m not worried about that.

“I’m just going to do as I want to do and what I think will have the most impact.’’

Thunberg is taking a year off school to travel around the Americas.

AIB

Edited by Abdulfatah Babatunde

Continue Reading

Foreign

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg to set sail for U.S.

Published

on

By

Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg on Wednesday is scheduled to set sail from the British city of Plymouth to attend a series of climate summits and protests in the U.S.

Thunberg, 16, who refused to fly because of the CO2 that aviation emits, would be travelling on the Malizia, a racing yacht captained by German sailor Boris Herrmann and Pierre Casiraghi of Monaco.

She planned to attend the UN Climate Action Summit in New York on Sept. 23, on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly, as well as climate protests planned for Sept. 20 and Sept. 27.

The teen had so far galvanised young people across Europe and beyond with her activism since she began a weekly school strike outside the Swedish parliament in 2018.

It had since snowballed into a global movement demanding action on climate change under the “Fridays for Future slogan“.

Her father Svante Thunberg, and filmmaker Nathan Grossman, were also to join the voyage, which was dependent on weather conditions.

She would also visit Canada and Mexico before joining the annual UN climate change conference hosted by Chile in December.

Earlier, Herrmann said he considered his role in Thunberg’s trip a big responsibility, being her first ever sailing trip.

All electricity on board the Malizia is generated from solar panels and underwater turbines.

Herrmann said the conditions on the yacht were spartan. The ship has no toilets on board, and only thin, tube-like bunks for beds. (dpa/NAN)

YI/SN

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also