Technology

Abuja, March 22, 2019 A legal practitioner, Mr Ken Chukwuma, on Friday, says Nigeria is long overdue to incorporate

technology into all areas of legal practice to meet the standard of the profession globally.

Chukwuma, the Managing Partner, Ken and Kent Lawyers, said this in an interview with News Agency of Nigeria in Abuja.

He described the current way of the practice as “mundane and still depicts the trend in the 70s and 80s in the era of evolving technology.”

According to him, Nigeria, having adopted the British pattern of legal practice, should also deploy technology to be at par with the UK system.

He said “most of the laws that regulate branding and publicity in Nigeria are old laws.

“Lawyers find it difficult to go out there and advertise or publicise their practise because there are certain things you do and may be found

in breach of the profession’s conduct.

“For instance, you are not supposed to go out there to market your practice, apart from doing it in the old ways and those certain ways cannot

promote your business.

“I believe that time has come for Nigerians to look into bringing technology into the legal practice, not just in terms of advertising, but

also in management of the practice.

“When you have technology, you are able to manage your case load in a way that you don’t forget the cases.”

He regretted the situation where lawyers in the country still write their dates for cases in diaries.

Chukwuma said “in this century, you come to court and the judge will ask that you speak slowly because he or she

is writing everything down, while other people will say there are many cases which is why the court is congested.

“Technology can help to improve the process. With the punch of a button, lawyers, judges and litigants can go through a case in minutes

and take decisions without excerting too much energy and for quick dispensation of justice.”

The legal practitioner emphasised that technology was important in every field as it would speed up processes and the attainment of fast results.

However, Chukwuma said it would also take the political will from stakeholders to change the current narrative in the legal practice.

He further said that synergy among stakeholders would facilitate the removal of some practices assumed to be against the conduct of the profession.

“People should be free to advertise what they do, as long as they are managing the process well, not divulging excess information and applying

technology where needed, there is nothing wrong in that,” he added.

He, however, admitted that there are many legal practitioners in the country, but branding which requires advertising what a legal firm or

organisation does will make the difference.

Chukwuma said that practicing Tech-Law in Nigeria is challenging, but it is part of the development process for the nation.