Connect with us

Foreign

Authorities send family back to DR Congo after 2 die of Ebola in Uganda

Published

on

Authorities repatriated the relatives of two people who died of Ebola in Uganda back to the Democratic Republic of Congo on Thursday, the Ugandan health minister said on Friday.

The repatriation included a three-year-old boy confirmed to be suffering from the disease.

The cases marked the first time the virus has crossed an international border since the current outbreak began in Congo in August.

The epidemic has already killed 1,390 people in eastern Congo.

The family sent home on Thursday had crossed from Congo to Uganda earlier this week and sought treatment when a five-year-old boy became unwell.

“He died of Ebola on Tuesday, while his 50-year-old grandmother, who was accompanying them, died of the disease on Wednesday,’’ the ministry said.

They were the first confirmed deaths in Uganda in the current Ebola outbreak.

“The dead boy’s father, mother, 3-year-old brother and their 6-month-old baby, along with the family’s maid, were all repatriated.

“The 3-year-old has been confirmed to be infected with Ebola, while his 23-year-old Ugandan father has displayed symptoms but tested negative,’’ the minister’s statement said.

According to the statement, Uganda remains in Ebola response mode to follow up the 27 contacts of the family.

“Three other suspected Ebola cases not related to the family remain in isolation,’’ the ministry said.

The viral disease spreads through contact with bodily fluids, causing hemorrhagic fever with severe vomiting, diarrhea and bleeding.

Authorities in neighbouring Uganda and South Sudan have been on high alert in case the disease spreads.

“On Thursday, Uganda banned public gatherings in the Kasese district where the family crossed the border.

“Residents are also taking precautions,’’ local journalist Ronald Kule told Reuters.

According to Kule, they are a little alarmed now and they realise that the risk of catching Ebola is now real.

“Hand washing facilities have been put in place, with washing materials like JIK bleach and soap, there’s no shaking of hands, people just wave at each other.

“At the border, health workers checked lines of people and isolate one child with a raised temperature,’’ a Reuters journalist said.

Uganda has already vaccinated many frontline health workers and is relatively well prepared to contain the virus.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) sent 3,500 doses of a Merck experimental vaccine to Uganda this week, following 4,700 initial doses.

Dr. Mike Ryan, head of WHO’s emergencies programme, said that he expected Uganda to approve the use of experimental therapeutic drug treatments, to be shipped “in coming days”.

Monitoring and vaccination had been stepped up, however there had been “no panic reaction” so far to the cases there.

The WHO has said it will reconvene an emergency committee to decide whether the outbreak is an international public health emergency and how to manage it.

Foreign

Suspected Ethiopian livestock raiders kill 12 in northern Kenya

Published

on

The attackers killed five men and injured three others when raiding about 500 cattle in the Manyatta Qoroso area of Marsabit County, which borders Ethiopia, on Saturday evening, police said in a statement.

A day later, the raiders attacked the nearby village of Kubi Ires Burale Fora, killing four adults and three children and stealing 1,000 goats, police said.

Kenyan authorities were on the hunt for the attackers by ground and air, according to the statement.

YEE

(Edited by Emmanuel Yashim)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Bells toll in U.S. to mark anniversary of beginning of slavery 

Published

on

The bell ringing is part of a national initiative to get Americans to recognize the historical importance of the arrival of the Africans in Virginia, then a British colony, at the end of Aug. 1619.

The Washington National Cathedral rang its largest funereal bell for one minute starting at 3 pm (1900 GMT) to mark the anniversary. Churches in Boston, Atlanta and other major cities were expected to join, as was the U.S. National Park Service.

The bells were rung to recognise the strength of the Africans in the face of injustice and dehumanization, Reverend Randolph Marshall Hollerith, dean of Washington National Cathedral, said in a statement.

Several events were held in Virginia over the weekend to mark the arrival of the enslaved Africans who came from a part of south-east coast of Africa that is now Angola.

That trade of the Africans for food at Point Comfort – now Fort Monroe, Virginia – is considered by many historians to be the beginning of slavery in the British colonies, a pivotal moment in American history that set the stage for the U.S. Civil War, segregation, lynchings, race riots and struggles with race relations that continue today.

YEE

(Edited by Emmanuel Yashim)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Israeli army alleges 3 rockets fired from Gaza into Israel –

Published

on

Two of the projectiles were intercepted by the Iron Dome aerial defence system, the army said.

The third struck a road, causing damage and a fire that was swiftly extinguished, according to Israeli media.

Sirens sounded in the city of Sderot, where a festival was taking place, and a number of other communities in the area.

The Magen David Adom emergency service said it treated seven people: six who was suffering from anxiety; and a 30-year-old woman who fell while running to the bomb shelter.

Overnight between Wednesday and Thursday, Israeli fighter jets struck a number of Hamas targets in Gaza in response to two rockets fired into Israel from the enclave.

A total of nine rockets have been fired from Gaza in just over a week.

No group in Gaza has claimed responsibility for the rockets. Spokesmen for the radical Islamist Hamas movement which rules Gaza have said the attacks were carried out by individuals and not by the group’s armed wing.

A Hamas spokesman warned last week that the difficult situation in Gaza would lead to a further escalation if Israel doesn’t show any commitment towards implementing understandings brokered by Egypt with Israel.

On Friday, Qatari envoy Mohammad Ammadi travelled to Gaza to hold talks with Hamas leaders on reinforcing ceasefire understandings with Israel, according to Palestinian security sources.

YEE

(Edited by Emmanuel Yashim)

 

Continue Reading

Foreign

6 Moroccan political detainees say they will give up citizenship 

Published

on

The lawyer, Mohammed Zyan, told dpa that the detainees wanted to take a stand against the Moroccan authorities.

However, it is not legal for anyone to request that they be stripped of citizenship, he added.

On Saturday, the father of Nasser Zefzafi, the leader of the protest movement, known as Hirak Rif, posted a video on his Facebook page in which he appeared reading out a message from the six detainees.

In the message, the detainees said that they would relinquish their citizenship, go on a hunger strike and renege on their allegiance to the Moroccan king.

They held the authorities responsible for their safety and called on the international community for support.

Last month, Morocco’s King Mohammed VI pardoned thousands of detainees, including some arrested over 2016 anti-government protests, in a move to mark his 20 years on the throne.

In 2016, a wave of street protests erupted in the northern province of al-Hoceima against unemployment and alleged government corruption.

The protests followed the death of a fish vendor who was crushed by a waste disposal truck while trying to prevent the destruction of his fish, which were confiscated by police.

The protests were some of the largest seen in Morocco since 2011.

YEE

(Edited by Emmanuel Yashim)

Continue Reading

Foreign

U.S., Japan agree ‘in principle’ on new trade pact 

Published

on

U.S. President Donald Trump said this on Sunday in Biarritz, France, venue of the G7 Summit.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met with Trump twice during the summit and confirmed that the deal was reached but final language still needed to be ironed out in the coming weeks.

The deal will include agriculture, industry and digital trade.

The U.S. noted that Japan will buy excess corn that China had promised to purchase but then dropped as part of the trade war.

In all, the U.S. says the deal will open up markets for 7 billion dollars in trade.

“It’s very good news for our farmers and ranchers, but it’s also good news for those who work in the digital e-commerce space, where it is the gold standard of an international agreement,” said U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer.

Trump and Abe have been building their bilateral relationship over the past two years and are seen has having grown very close.

A trade deal between the largest and third-largest economies in the world would be a positive gain from their relationship, especially given the collapse of U.S. negotiations with China and the ratcheting-up of the trade war between Beijing and Washington.

Trump had rejected the planned Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that former president Barack Obama had negotiated with nations in that region, leaving a potential vacuum.

YEE

(Edited by Emmanuel Yashim)

Continue Reading

© 2019 NNN NEWS NIGERIA. All Rights Reserved.