Connect with us

Features

NABDA Biodigester: Alternative energy source for Nigerians

Published

on

Over the last decades, International Development Organisations have been actively engaged in encouraging biogas technologies in the developing world.

The development partners underscored the rising need for the reduction of pollution and re-use of Biodegradable organic Feedback (BoF), particularly in Africa.

According to them, bio-energy constitutes a significant proportion of energy mix of countries in Europe, America and should be replicated in Africa.

This development necessitated the adaptation of technologies that can transform BoF such as, food and agro-related waste, sewage sludge and municipal organic waste into valuable products like bioenergy and biofertiliser.

Experts in the field observed that Egypt, Algeria, South Africa and Kenya have made good success in the areas of biogas generation for domestic cooking and bioelectricity generation.

It was, therefore, not an accident, when in 2015 the Federal Government, as parts of Nigeria’s Economy Recovery and Growth Plan mandated the National Biotechnology Development Agency (NABDA) to design programmes for the nation’s bioenergy advancement.

The focus of NABDA in this regards was clear – to develop prototype digesters and other systems that will utilise the abundant BoF across the country-.

Specifically, the agency was given the mandate to ensure that bioenergy, comprising ethanol and biogas constitute five per cent of Nigeria’s energy mix.

In a major breakthrough, NABDA on July 23 unveiled a prototype Digesters and Process Optimisation Test Systems to serve as alternative energy in rural and urban settlements of the country.

The Acting Director-General of the agency, Prof. Alex Akpa who performed the unveiling ceremony in Abuja said the unique product known as prototype digester was developed by the Environmental Biotechnology and Bio-Conservation Department of NABDA.

Akpa noted that the product was built for households, small and medium scale enterprises such as restaurants, small farms, small artisanal clusters and small abattoirs.

“The Biodigester is quite affordable, the smallest size is about N75,000 while the biggest is about N150,000.

“We are ready for the market. We are hopeful that industrialists could partner with us to achieve mass production,’’ he said.

The acting D-G said the prototype bio-digesters have been developed with all sectors in mind comprising three sizes produced and named BEGS 250 litres, BEGS 500litres and BEGS 1000litres.

“The team has developed the capacity to retrofit existing gasoline and diesel generator to use biogas as fuel for electricity generation.

“The technology can transform biodegradable organic feedstock into valuable products such as biogas and bio-fertiliser.

He assured that the agency would continue to provide technical assistance in all aspects of bio-energy development in the country and ensure the digesters and test systems are produced in quantities that would be affordable.

Mr Ayodele Oluwole explained that biodigester is designed as a closed system, capable of fermenting biodegradable materials placed inside it to produce a renewable energy source.

Oluwole, a biogas technologist, said organic materials such as agricultural waste, manure, municipal waste, plant material, sewage, green waste or food waste are broken down in the biodigester to produce biogas which is mixture of gasses – methane, hydrogen and carbon monoxide-.

He said the energy released, through combustion allows biogas to be used as a fuel that could be used for any heating purpose, such as cooking.

Oluwole added that it could also be used in a gas engine to convert the energy in the gas into electricity.

“In advanced usage, Biogas can also be compressed, the same way as natural gas is compressed and used to power motor vehicles.

“In the United Kingdom for example, biogas is estimated to have the potential to replace around 17 per cent of vehicle fuel,’’ he said.

Mrs Gloria Obioh, the Head of the department that championed the innovation allayed the fear of readily available raw materials for the biodigester.

Obioh said organic wastes including sewage sludge account for about 50 per cent of municipal solid wastes in Nigeria.

She added that agricultural waste, manure, plant material and green waste are readily available in rural settlements of the country.

“The project has enhanced capacity for job creation across all value chains – digester fabrication, energy generation, waste management and bio-fertiliser production-’’.

“Consequently there would be several spin-off industries which would contribute greatly to Gross Domestic Products (GDP) and National Development,’’ she said.

Obioh also noted that, if developed, Anaerobic Digestion Technology (ADT) will contribute up to 20,000 MW of electricity to the national grid.

The Executive Vice Chairman of National Agency for Science and Engineering Infrastructure (NASENI), Prof Mohammed Haruna urged NABDA to perfect the technology and make the products available to end users.

Stakeholders in the sector believe that the breakthrough by NABDA will be whole when the agency, make the products affordable and available as alternative energy source to rural, urban settlements.

Features

New cabinet and imperative of delivering on mandates

Published

on

New cabinet and imperative of delivering on mandates

By Chijioke Okoronkwo, Nigeria News Agency

At the 2-day presidential retreat that preceded the inauguration of new ministers, President Muhammadu Buhari apprised the appointees on the enormity of the tasks ahead.

The president told them that Nigerians were anxiously waiting for their services; hence they could not afford to fail on their mandates.

According to Buhari, there is a collective responsibility to improve the welfare of majority of Nigerians.

The president reiterated the urgency of driving accelerated economic development as majority of Nigerians were poor and eagerly hoping for a better life.

“Hoping for a Nigeria in which they do not have to worry about what they will eat, where they will live or if they can afford to pay for their children’s education or healthcare.

“Our responsibility as leaders of this great country is to meet these basic needs for our people.’’

More, so, the Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Boss Mustapha, said that the retreat underpinned the appropriate Key Performance Indicators (KPls) and measures of success for each initiative.

“Some of the agreements from our deliberations include: Consolidate and accelerate on the agricultural agenda to achieve full food sufficiency, increase revenue, implement measures to reduce leakages and drive cost optimisation and ensure effective coordination, between monetary and fiscal policy.

“Invest in human capital development with strong focus on early education and health insurance, facilitate investment in oil and gas sector by ensuring speedy passage of the Petroleum Industry Bill and Deep Offshore Oil and Exploration and Production Bill, resolve the liquidity challenge in power sector and facilitate private sector investment,’’ he said.

Again, at the swearing in of the 43 ministers on Aug. 21, Buhari reminded the appointees that the primary business of the administration over the next four years was to work together towards delivering the results that the people of Nigeria expect.

Buhari said that there was a great opportunity as an administration to build on the progress already made, in order to ensure steady growth and development.

“While recognising the existing challenges and the urgent need to surmount them; we must not fail to note the progress we have made since inception.

“Our economic policy, which is the Economic Recovery and Growth Plan, is still robust and on course with the necessary policies and initiatives to sustain the country’s exit from recession, engender growth and promote the value chain of infrastructural development, he said.

In tandem with the focus of the administration, the new ministers, after taking their oath of office, expressed optimism on delivering on the mandate of their respective ministries.

Sen. Chris Ngige, who was returned as the Minister of Labour and Employment, said that it was a good home coming for him as he hoped for better working relations with labour unions.

“I expect better working relations; I will align with labour in their legitimate struggles.

“There is no job that does not have hazards; what happened at the last moment was part of the hazards of the job.

“There is nothing like crisis; we are a family; we had family disagreement and we have resolved them; we are in good term,’’ he said.

On the stalemate about the implementation of the minimum wage, Ngige said it would be resolved immediately.

He, however, explained that there were intricacies of minimum wage negotiations which would be sorted out.

“We know what a good template will be for government at federal, states and local governments, and for the workers themselves; we want them to smile; so, we must do something that put smile on their faces.

“We are bringing a template that we will send down from the Salaries, Incomes and Wages Commission.

“We will agree on it with the Joint Negotiating Council; my permanent secretary held forth while I was away; he will brief me and we will take it up from there,’’ the minister said.

Mrs Zainab Ahmed, Minister of Finance, Budget and National Planning, said the ministry under her would work to sustain the Nigerian economy on the part of growth.

She said that the ministry would try its best to make sure that the economy was sustained on the path of growth and prevent fiscal crisis.

Ahmed said that her focus would be on the economy.

On combining finance, budget and national planning, the minister said that she had worked with budget and national planning, therefore combining both tasks would not pose a challenge to her.

“There are competent persons on both sides that will support me in my work.

“I will be co-coordinating both the budget and planning work as well as that of finance.

“So, I am sure that we are going to do well,” she said.

On his part, Alhaji Lai Mohammed, Minister of Information and Culture, reminded heads of parastatals under the ministry, that the only reward for hardwork was more work.

He said that they were entrusted with the responsibility to turn down the heat, hostility and hatred that was threatening the country.

“Use your powerful platforms to restore unity to the country and promote cordial relationship among the various groups, irrespective of ethnicity or religion.

“I want to appeal to you to please redouble your efforts and ensure that we work together to take back our country from agents of disunity and destabilisation.

“I have no doubt that together we can turn down the acrimony that is being promoted by enemies of the country, using platforms which are not as powerful as yours,” he said.

On his part, Mr Olamilekan Adegbite, the new Minister of Mines and Steel Development, said that President Buhari had set an agenda from the 2-day retreat.

He said he would put in his best and deliver on his mandate for Nigerians.

“In line with the three-point agenda of the President, there is a lot of potential in mineral resources which we can exploit further to diversify from oil.

“Also, we want to lift people out of poverty; we will begin to encourage our people to add value to the minerals, instead of just sending the minerals raw like that,’’ he said.

For George Akume, the new Minister of Special Duties, it was a rare privilege to be selected to serve in a country of over 200 million people.

“What I have to say at this stage is that all the ministers are committed to the success of this administration.

“Nigerians are expecting so much from us; we cannot afford to fail and I believe by the grace of God, we shall not fail,’’ he said.

The new Minister of Niger Delta Affairs, Sen. Godswill Akpabio, said he knew why the ministry was set up and would deploy his energy toward achieving the mandate.

“Being a Niger Delta person, I will ensure that things are better for further and effective development of the region.

“So the President is looking forward to commissioning a lot of projects in the Niger Delta region.

“I believe the Niger Delta region and its people, are looking forward to the alleviation of poverty in their lives and transformation of infrastructure,” he said.

Minister of Works and Housing, Mr Babatunde Fashola, on his part, harped on the need for cost and wastage reduction in implementation of projects.

As the ministers exude confidence on their ability to deliver, Nigerians await to see if they will perform. (NANFeatures)

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Features

Muhammadu Buhari: Slavery still exists – We must take action

Published

on

Four centuries ago, the first 20 documented African slaves arrived on the shores of Virginia. In the years that followed, millions more were shipped in dehumanizing conditions across the ocean and enslaved. Slavery had, of course, existed before. But this indicated the beginning of a mechanized trade that saw human beings reduced to property on an unprecedented scale.

Despite the fact that descendants of African slaves have made valuable contributions across society, they are still dealing with the effects of this poisonous legacy. They still have to navigate its everyday manifestations, such as discrimination, racism or lack of access to resources and opportunities. This must not be overlooked or forgotten.

Yet, as we reflect on this day, International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and Its Abolition, it is clear slavery did not only thrive then. It still thrives today. Across the world it is estimated there are as many as 40 million men, women and children living in forced servitude. They are the industrial victims of a business many believe was abolished hundreds of years ago. They are the modern enslaved.

Their exploitation appears in many guises, though usually unrecognized as slavery. Many victims are unseen, hidden beneath opaque supply chains. Others are hidden in plain sight, entrapped by circumstances that rob them of autonomy. In any case, their labor, often dangerous, is no product of choice, and its conditions are self-perpetuating.

In Africa, its modern forms include debt bondage, the enslavement of war captives, commercial sexual exploitation and forced domestic servitude. Holding people held against their will, controlling their movements and forcing them to work for the sole profit of others — wherever they are — is slavery today and always.

The abolitionists of the 19th century succeeded more than any before: By working to extinguish the transatlantic slave trade that had claimed 15 million victims, they laid the groundwork to ensure it did not manufacture millions more. But their work is not done. We must take up their examples as we forge a path forward to eliminate modern-day slavery in all its forms.

Slavery, once again, has become entwined in the global economy — and it is largely unseen. For instance, most of us might know in principle that the mining of cobalt crucial to our smartphones might have used forced labor. But what do we know of those that experience it? Just as personal testimony and resulting public pressure led to the passing of the Act for the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Britain in 1807, these stories must be told and used to inform policy. Once heard, they can elevate visceral reactions, driving the public pressure needed to ensure the application of anti-slavery laws.

One distinction from then and now is important: the costs. From records, adjusted for today’s prices, the cost of a human-being-as-property was valued on average at $40,000. Today, it is just $90, sometimes even lower. We must remember that slavery is not simply a campaign of hatred; it is the pursuit of profit. One way to extinguish it in its current forms, therefore, is to make it economically unfeasible. This means making sure that any anti-slavery laws have bite, come with strong penalties and are enforced.

It is also vital to have a robust tip-off and reporting system. Where this once meant detecting ships, today the signs are less conspicuous. The public must be shown how to see what is hidden in plain sight, particularly signs of suspicious behavior. This might seem broad. But vagueness should not give rise to reluctance to report anything that could be smuggling or forced servitude. If something doesn’t look right, report it, for you could be securing another human’s freedom.

In Nigeria, our anti-trafficking agency has rolled out the “Not for Sale” campaign to protect against the deceptions of human smugglers, helping those who might be vulnerable to false promises see through the ruse and say no. These prevention programs are crucial.

The appearance of slavery today might have changed. The institution has not. There are no radical solutions to conjure, only political will. But on this, we can learn from the past, the shadows in which modern slavery proliferates today.

It is not enough to mark this 400th anniversary. We must use it as a platform to eliminate slavery in all its present-day forms. We should reflect in memory to find a better future, one that should ensure freedom for all.

Continue Reading

Environment

Harnessing young peoples potential to mitigate climate action in Nigeria

Published

on

Harnessing young peoples’ potential to mitigate climate action in Nigeria

By Dianabasi Effiong, Nigeria News Agency

The Federal Ministry of Environment, in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on Aug. 15 hosted a two-day Regional Youth Climate Incubation Hub for select youths in Nigeria’s South-South Zone.

The forum was the first in a programme designed by organisers to cover six zones and further strengthen Nigeria’s position as a member country of the United Nations’ Youth Engagement and Public Mobilisation track at the Climate Action Summit.

The summit is slated for Sept. 23 in New York for participants to offer ideas on ways to stop the increase in emissions by 2020 and “dramatically reduce emissions to reach net-zero emissions by mid-century’’, among others.

The Port Harcourt event, facilitated by Health of the Mother Earth Foundation (HOMEF), an environmental think-tank organisation, had participants drawn from Akwa Ibom, Bayelsa, Cross River, Delta, Edo and Rivers States.

A trending document on UN Climate Action Summit 2019 from the global organisation stated that Global emissions had reached record levels.

It stated: “The last four years were the four hottest on record, and winter temperatures in the Arctic have risen by 3°C since 1990.

“Sea levels are rising, coral reefs are dying, and we are starting to see the life-threatening impact of climate change on health, through air pollution, heat waves and risks to food security.

“The impacts of climate change are being felt everywhere and are having very real consequences on people’s lives. Climate change is disrupting national economies, costing us dearly today and even more tomorrow.

“But there is a growing recognition that affordable, scalable solutions are available now that will enable us all to leapfrog to cleaner, more resilient economies.

“The latest analysis shows that if we act now, we can reduce carbon emissions within 12 years and hold the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C and even, as asked by the latest science, to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.’’

“Thankfully, we have the Paris Agreement – a visionary, viable, forward-looking policy framework that sets out exactly what needs to be done to stop climate disruption and reverse its impact.

It also stated, sadly, that “the agreement itself is meaningless without ambitious action’’.

The UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, expects from world leaders at the proposed summit, innovative, concrete and realistic plans “to enhance their nationally determined contributions by 2020, in line with reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 45 per cent over the next decade, and to net zero emissions by 2050’’.

In reaction to such expectations, Mr Nnimmo Bassey, an Environmental Justice Advocate and Director of HOMEF, underscored the importance of the Youth Round table on Climate Action to unlock youth innovation in Nigeria’s climate action.

He also told participants at the forum, which included about 70 young people, that they were capable of brightest ideas for solving problems of climate change in Nigeria.

According to him, the greatest action government can take on gas flaring is to stop it and not to reduce it.

“If government can stop gas flaring by the year 2020 it will be a great achievement for the people to be released from the embarrassment on our environmental health and our children’s health,” Bassey said.

He also said that the Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB) should be put in place to penalise anybody or company that defaulted on gas flaring in Nigeria.

He called on government to take seriously, the ideas of youths on how to tackle climate change and global warming because it encapsulated their future and that of their children.

Also, Mr Sheyifumi Adebosey, a youth activist, told the forum that young people were the second most important group in addressing climate change because it is about their future.

Adebosey, who said that youth action on climate change to protect our environment had national value, also renewed the call for urgency in tackling the global climate change.

Similarly, Miss Anumenechi Stephanie, the Digital Communication Head of International Climate Change Development Initiative Africa (ICCDI), called for government’s collaboration with companies and Non-Governmental Organisations to stop gas flaring.

She said that such collaboration should ensure that gas is used for economic growth nstead of being flared.

Expectedly, the Federal Ministry of Environment, through its Department of Climate Change, charged participants on the imperatives of the event, adding that climate and climate change have become issues of global concern particularly in Third World countries like Nigeria.

Sa’adatu Gambo, a Senior Scientific Officer at the Department of Climate Change, who represented the Federal Ministry of Environment, said that the Department of Climate Change remained Nigeria’s focal point for the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The expectation of the organisers were that “there will be an acceleration of key improvement on climate change’’ at the end of the event.

They also expected what they called “creative ideas that are specific, measurable, achievable, bankable, realistic and time bound, which will be harnessed and built from concept stage to actual implementation’’.

Participants also observed that issues of climate change called for emergency in Nigeria and that proactive measures should be taken by the Nigerian government to tackle it.

They also observed that the non-implementation of extant environmental laws and policies continually serve as major setback in the fight for a safe climate in Nigeria

The need to create more awareness among Nigerians, financial investment and transfer of technology to build human capacity and groom basic ideas to mitigate climate crises in Nigeria were also restated by participants at the Port Harcourt event.

The young people engaged in series of brain storming and Focused Group Discussion (FGD) where innovative ideas were proffered.

These included the need for that Climate Change Desk Officers at both Federal and State ministries in Nigeria who should ensure that participants in the Youth Climate Hub were further engaged on climate change issues.

They also recommended that biogas should be generated from household biodegradable waste and bio-digester while effort should be made on recycling in regards to plastic bottle collection and reuse and also waste segregation and separation.

The group as called for the establishment of environmental clubs and advocacy for target groups and also creating certain social documentaries on climate change in local dialects.

According to the “Youth Climate Incubation Hub’’, `Apps should be available to map vulnerable and non-vulnerable areas to climate change impact’ and solar panels should be made more affordable for the people.

The young people also called for Mangrove reclamation and tree planting, especially indigenous species and economic crops.

They said: “There is need for government at all levels to stop paying lip service and amplify action on climate change policy  implementations.

“There should be a massive advocacy campaigns on the impact of climate change; the inclusion of climate change education in our curriculum at the various levels of learning in Nigeria.’’

According to the group, youths voices should be further amplified and their creative ideas on climate change harnessed.

They also stressed the need to strengthen existing structure to integrate women and marginalised groups’ participation in all levels in climate action in Nigeria. (NANFeatures)

 

 

Continue Reading

Features

Feature: 10 Years Without Argungu International Fishing and Cultural Festival  

Published

on

 

10 Years Without Argungu International Fishing and Cultural Festival

By Ibrahim Bello, Nigeria News Agency

Stakeholders are worried that for 10 years the Argungu International Fishing and Cultural Festival has not been celebrated. The festival usually staged in March of every year held last in 2009.

It attracts fishermen from Niger Republic, Chad, Benin Republic and Cameroon.

Infrastructure at the venue of the festival are at great state of decay because of the abandonment.

The Argungu Grand Fishing Hotel by the side of  the Matan Fada River, where the event normally takes place is in a bad state.

The pavilion and its environs are over grown with weeds, indicating inactivity.

Alhaji Hussaini Makwashi (Sarkin Ruwa), the `chief of  fishermen,’ in the area, who  also overseers the Matan Fada Fishing River, pleaded that the festival should not be allowed to die.

He recounted the history of the festival, which he says dates back to 1934.

 

 

Makwashi said that it started during the reign of Muhammadu Sama, as emir of Argungu.

He said that the emir invited Sultan Hassan Dan-Muazu as a way of cementing relationship and fostering unitybetween the Fulani people and the Kabawa people.

.Makwashi  said that Dan-Muazu slept in Argungu, making him the first sultan to pass the night in the area.

“The emir sought the opinion of his people (Kabawa ) to know what to do in order to impress the sultan.

“The people came up with the idea of organising a grand fishing festival to entertain the sultan who was the first sultan to visit the area.

“That proposal resulted to more stronger ties between the Fulani and Kabawa people and even gave birth to inter-ethnic marriages between the two ethnic groups who were once sworn enemies,” he said.

Makwashi said that fishermen in the area had incurred losses as a result of the suspension or stoppage of the fishing festival.

 

“It is disheartening that this colourful and wealth generation event, which tourists from within and outside the country attend will just be abandoned like that.

“We were told some years back by the government that the event was put on hold because of the deteriorating security situation, especially when Boko Haram activities were devastating.

“And you know the festival attracts large number of people who come in their thousands to watch the events.

” We reasoned with them at that point in time, but now we have overcome such threat as we have no Boko Haram fear or attacks,” he said.

He lamented the economic difficulties faced by the  fishermen and their families, adding that they depended on the festival to get money to feed their families and sponsor their children to schools.

He said that the festival hosts over 30,000 fishermen from different places and countries, stressing that many people depend on the festival for their livelihood.

“We call on Gov. Atiku Bagudu, to fulfill his promise of reviving the fishing festival and also renovate the dilapidated structure at the fishing village,” he pleaded.

Alhaji Musa Argungu, a fisherman, said it had not been easy for the fishermen for the past 10 years. He said that the stoppage had caused them great economic havoc.

“This has been our business and we do it to earn ourliving, no one will be happy when he wakes up and discovers his means of livelihood is stopped.

“Whenever the fishing event holds, we earn reasonable amount of money that will solve many monetary challenges of our families, including money to `marry off’ our daughters.

” Put yourself in our shoes and imagine life without such an income for 10 years.

“Do you know that in a good day at the climax of the festival, we could get as much as N50,000 to N70,000 and in just one day,” he said.

Argungu pleaded with the government to revive and restore the lost glory of the event.

Alhaji Aminu Abubakar, Chairman of  Kebbi Hoteliers’ Managers Association, said the managers had lost huge source of revenue due to delay in holding the festival.

“We have over 30 functional hotels in the state and we have been managing them well, should the festival be staged tomorrow, we are ready for the visitors.

” The business, if not because of  non-governmental organisations that do come for workshops and trainings as well as wedding events, the hoteliers may close down their businesses.

“We contribute a lot to the employment generation in the state, as whenever the festival is to take place, we increase the number of our staff or employ ad hoc staff, ” Abubakar said.

The manager appealed to the government to quickly  organise the event to enable them get more patronage.

Alhaji Shu’aibu Aliero, the Permanent Secretary, Kebbi Ministry of Information and Culture, noted that the festival had not been held for 10 years.

Aliero said that whatever the reasons people outside the government circle might give other than the following reasons could be described as figment of their imagination.

“The festival is suspended due largely to security situation in the country.

” We are living witnesses to the deteriorating security situation in the country that ranged from Boko Haram, kidnapping, cattle rustling and banditry.

“Though Kebbi has been adjudged as one of the most peaceful states in Nigeria, the fact remains that the state has borders with states like Zamfara, Sokoto, Kaduna and Niger, that have intermittent security challenges.

” Furthermore, there is the issue of climate change; it is observed that the low water level of Matan Fada River cannot allow the climax of the festival to take place over the years, because fishes are believed to be no longer there due to the absence of free flow of water from its tributaries,” he said.

According to him, the government waited for security situation to improve and for the water level to rise to enable her make preparations for the festival.

The permanent secretary said that the security situation had improved and the water level had risen, which prompted the state government to start preparations for the festival to take place either this year or early 2020.

Alhaji Umar Bena, Director of Tourism in the Ministry of Commerce, Industry, Co-operative and Tourism, also attributed the suspension of the event to security challenges.

” You see, basically security concern in the country is the main reason why the ceremony has not been held for 10 years.

“Argungu Fishing Festival is an international event; people from different parts of the world assemble in Argungu; it will be too risky to hold such an event in an uncertain security situation,” he said.

Bena expressed optimism that the event might soon hold because of the improved security situation in the country.

(NANFeatures)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Features

President Buhari’s remarks during meeting with Northern Traditional Leaders

Published

on

5.     Let me on this note commend your Royal Highnesses for your concern and contributions through numerous messages to me. We welcome every such expression of concern in our overall efforts to address any challenges.

6.     We are determined to step up action against crimes of kidnapping, banditry and other forms of unlawful and criminal attacks resulting in needless deaths plunging our people to untold hardship.

10.   These policies and programmes include a robust revamping of police intelligence gathering capacity and the significant boosting of the numbers of security personnel in our local communities. This in specific terms will include recruiting more police officers and doing so whenever possible from their local government areas, where they would then be stationed in the best traditions of policing world-wide.

11.   Working with the State governments also, we intend to improve the equipping of the police force with advanced technology and equipment that can facilitate their work. To drive this, I recently created a full fledged Ministry of Police Affairs.

12.   As I said during my meeting with the Traditional Rulers from the South-West, directives have been issued to the appropriate federal authorities to speedily approve licensing for States requesting the use of drones to monitor forests and other criminal hideouts.

13.   We also intend to install CCTVs on highways and other strategic locations so that activities in some of those hidden places can be exposed, more effectively monitored and open to actionable intervention.

15.   Your Royal Highnesses, this Administration is determined to enforce the law, prosecute law breakers and secure an atmosphere of peace for all Nigerians wherever they live and also protect our communities from all forms of crimes. This is both in our interests as an administration and the interests of all Nigerians.

Continue Reading

© 2019 NNN NEWS NIGERIA. All Rights Reserved.