Connect with us

Foreign

7 Syrian rebels killed in Libya’s battles

Published

on

At least seven Syrian rebels were killed on Saturday in battles in Libya, a Syrian war monitor reported.

The rebels were killed on several battlefields in Libya, as many more have been captivated, said the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

The UK-based watchdog group said over 318 Syrian rebels have so far been killed in battles in Libya.

In an earlier report, the Observatory said as many as 13,000 rebels from Syria have so far reached Libya to fight against the east-based army led by Khalifa Haftar.

The rebels were moved from Syria to Libya through the Turkish territory under the supervision of Turkey, according to the Observatory.

The Turkey-backed rebels opened four centers in the northern Syrian city of Afrin to recruit fighters to be sent to Libya.

Turkey offers a monthly salary of 2,000 U.S. dollars for those who agree to go to Libya on contracts between three and six months, said the observatory.

(XINHUA)

Olawale Olukoga: is a graduate and a professionally trained journalist, with experience in national news reporting/editing and verification at the News Agency of Nigeria. NNN is a Nigerian online news portal that publishes breaking news in Nigeria, and across the world. Our journalists are honest, fair, accurate, thorough and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting news in the best interest of the public, because truth is the cornerstone of journalism and they strive diligently to ascertain the truth in every news report. Contact: editor[at]nnn.com.ng

Foreign

UN rights experts urge Canada to rescue orphan girl from Syrian camp

Published

on

Canada must urgently secure the release of a five-year-old girl who has been stranded in Syria’s notorious Al Hol camp since her suspected extremist parents were killed, UN human rights monitors demanded on Wednesday.

Amira Kamil, a Canadian national, is one of over 40,000 children living in the camp in north-eastern Syria, which is overcrowded with a total of 70,000 people.

According to the UN experts, who monitor issues such as terrorism, arbitrary detention and mental health, children in Al Hol are deprived of liberty, and they lack access to food, water, sanitation, medical care and education.

“The children are also exposed to violence and exploitation,’’ the experts said in a statement issued in Geneva.

Amira’s parents, who are suspected to have been affiliated with Islamic State extremists, were reportedly killed in an airstrike in 2019.

“Canada should try harder to work with countries and organisations that have access to the camp to bring the girl home to her relatives.

“Children like Amira should be regarded primarily as victims and treated as such.

“They should not be punished because of the presumed behaviour or affiliation of their parents,’’ they added.

As people fled from Islamic State, the population of Al Hol exploded from about 10,000 at the start of 2019 to its current state.

Edited By: Abiodun Oluleye and Isaac Aregbesola (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

UN humanitarian chief wants renewal of authorization of cross-border aid mechanism for Syrians

Published

on

UN Undersecretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Mark Lowcock on Tuesday asked the Security Council to renew its authorization of the cross-border aid mechanism for Syrians at an early date in order to prevent disruption of life-saving assistance.

The cross-border operation for northwest Syria, authorized by the Security Council, is a lifeline for millions of civilians whom the United Nations cannot reach by other means. It cannot be substituted. Its authorization must be renewed, said Lowcock.

The current mandate for cross-border aid delivery expires on July 10. In January, the Security Council, after much wrangling, re-authorized two of four crossings for six months. The remaining crossings — Bab al-Salam and Bab al-Hawa — are on the Syrian-Turkish border.

An early renewal by the Security Council will avoid disruption of this vital operation and help humanitarian organizations continue the scale-up that the current needs and the prospect of COVID-19 demand. A delay will increase suffering and cost lives, he warned.

Lowcock noted that the UN secretary-general’s review of cross-line and cross-border operations was submitted to the Security Council ahead of schedule to allow the council to take a timely decision and avoid the disruption of aid.

The findings of the review are clear: meeting the enormous humanitarian needs in the northwest requires a renewal of the cross-border authorization for 12 months. The UN monitoring mechanism for such operations should be extended for the same period, Lowcock told the Security Council in a briefing.

“This decision cannot be left to the last minute. Too many lives are at stake,” he warned.

Sustaining pipelines in this massive operation requires weeks and often months of lead-time. An environment of uncertainty risks the continuity of aid. It undermines the ability of humanitarian organizations to save lives, said Lowcock.

In April, 1,365 trucks crossed from Turkey into the northwest through the two border crossings. This is an increase of over 130 percent on April 2019, said Lowcock.

The surge was due to the rapid deterioration of the humanitarian situation since December, the need to prepare for the impact of COVID-19, and the uncertainty under which the operation was being conducted, he said.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Iran denies agreements with Russia on ousting Syrian president

Published

on

The international affairs adviser to Iran’s parliament speaker on Sunday denied reports about an agreement between Iran and Russia to remove Syrian President Bashar al-Assad from power.

“Bashar al-Assad is the legitimate president of Syria and the great leader of the fight against Takfiri terrorism in the Arab world,” Hossein Amir-Abdollahian tweeted.

“Rumor about Iran-Russia consensus for his (Assad’s) resignation is a big lie,” he said, adding the news is a trick by the U.S. and Israeli media.

“Iran strongly supports Syria sovereignty, national unity and territorial integrity,” noted Amir-Abdollahian, former deputy foreign minister for Arab and African Affairs.

The Iranian official’s comments came in the backdrop of recent western media reports that Iran and Russia have agreed on the removal of Assad and subsequent formation of a transitional government.

Iran and Russia have been major allies of the Syrian government against the armed rebels since 2011.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Over 2,000 Syrians return home in 2 weeks amid COVID-19

Published

on

As many as 2,270 Syrians have returned to Syria over the past two weeks as part of the government’s effort to bring back the Syrians stranded abroad as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the health ministry said in a statement on Thursday.

Over the past two weeks, 13 trips were made to bring back Syrians from other countries including Russia, the United Arab Emirates and Iraq, according to the statement.

The arrivals were put into quarantine centers for 14 days, said the report, adding that all services provided for the quarantined people are free.

On Wednesday, the ministry said a new COVID-19 infection was recorded in Syria, bringing the total number in the country to 48.

Meanwhile, Syria has so far recorded 29 recoveries and three deaths from COVID-19, according to the ministry’s statement.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Feature: Young Syrian man develops agriculture project on rooftop by using hydroponics system

Published

on

Abdul-Rahman al-Masri, a 23-year-old Syrian man, climbs seven floors every day to his rooftop to see the vegetables which he planted by using the hydroponics system.

The young man, who is in his final year in the civil engineering faculty, has for long been searching for a project to help him make a living without the limitation of regular employment.

After researches, al-Masri realized that the best choice to work on is the food project, because no matter how hard life could be, people would still need food.

Without the farmland to plant vegetables, the young man turned to the hydroponics system, a method of growing plants in a water-based and nutrient-rich way.

Hydroponics does not need soil. Instead, the root system is supported by an inert medium such as perlite, rock wool, clay pellets, peat moss, or vermiculite.

The young man experimented for two years on this planting system before launching his project on the rooftop of his house in the Beit Sahem area in the countryside of Damascus after taking a loan of 4,000 U.S. dollars from friends.

“The idea started in 2018. I searched for projects that I can personally develop, especially the projects that would continue regardless of the circumstances,” he told Xinhua.

Al-Masri added that he preferred the hydroponics system as it could be invested anywhere.

His rooftop of 65 square meters has served him well to set up the planting system, where the water runs through plastic tubes connected with one another on different levels to water the plants.

Al-Masri sees the plants and the level of water in the tubes almost on a daily basis. He is currently planting cucumber and the harvest will be ready in a couple of months.

He plants different types of vegetables according to the time of the year.

Al-Masri said that he could harvest 35 tons of vegetables per year and sell them to the grocery shops in his neighborhood.

“I realized that no matter what happens, the food projects would continue. What we came to realize during the current coronavirus crisis is that only the food remained in demand,” he said.

The young energetic man is setting an example to the young generation that there are ways of making a better life with concentration and self-confidence.

“I told people at my age that don’t give up on your dreams and with the right amount of efforts and determination, everything is possible,” he said.

“I am really proud of him. He is our neighbor and we love what he has done here as he took full advantage of the useless space on the rooftop to make something useful,” Ahmad, al-Masri’s neighbor, told Xinhua.

Al-Masri hoped that he can expand his project to grow products with better qualities and prices to reach more marketplaces.

“If I’d have a bigger farmland and funding, I could have better and bigger production in terms of the quality and prices,” he said.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Syrian president sacks trade minister

Published

on

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Monday discharged the internal trade and consumer protection minister and named the governor of Homs province as the new minister instead, state news agency SANA reported.

Assad ended the service of Atef Naddaf, the minister of internal trade, and named Talal Barazi, the governor of Homs province in central Syria, as the new minister, said the report.

The official news agency did not give details on why Assad sacked Naddaf, but apparently the decision comes against the backdrop of the bad economic situation in the country and the skyrocketing prices that couldn’t so far be controlled.

Barazi, who assumed the post of Homs governor in 2013, is a Syrian businessman who holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from the Damascus University. He has also run several business projects in the country.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

UN concerned over impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable Syrians

Published

on

The United Nations is concerned over the impact of COVID-19 on people across Syria, many of them displaced and particularly vulnerable, a UN spokesman said on Monday.

The Syrian government has confirmed 43 COVID-19 cases, including three deaths, said Stephane Dujarric, spokesman for UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. The most recent case was confirmed on Sunday.

“The United Nations continues to step up its efforts to mitigate the virus’ spread, with a focus on enhancing the capacity to detect, diagnose and prevent the spread of COVID-19 to the extent possible, ensure adequate surveillance of entry points, and provide protective equipment and training of health workers,” Dujarric said.

The World Health Organization is leading UN efforts to support preparation and mitigation measures across Syria, including in the volatile northwest and northeast, he said.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Feature: Syrian students continue education on TV amid COVID-19

Published

on

As the Syrian government suspends schools amid the COVID-19 spread, students continue their education on TV at home as the government uses an educational channel to broadcast lessons.

The educational channel used to broadcast two hours in the morning and two hours in the evening ahead of the COVID-19 crisis.

Following closure of schools due to the pandemic, the channel has been activated in full swing with a daily broadcast of 12 hours to help the students make up for the missed lessons.

For many, this solution is effective through good interaction between the students and the teachers who are giving the lessons over the air.

The channel now covers all curriculums from the elementary school to the high school. The aired programs and lessons are also posted on YouTube so that the students can watch them again.

Yazan Safarjalani, a 15-year-old student, told Xinhua that learning on TV and online is a good way to continue his education at home amid the COVID-19 crisis.

“We had to stay at home to study and rely on the educational lessons offered on TV and the internet. These methods are a good solution, even though not as comprehensive as the education in schools, but it’s a good alternative to make up for the missed lessons,” he said.

His sister, Yara Safarjalani, a sixth-grader, said that taking lessons from TV and online is a new way of learning that they have never experienced before.

Mazen Abdul-Karim, an English school teacher, told Xinhua that TV plays a role in offering educational materials for the students during the COVID-19 spread.

For his side, Wael Shahin, the manager of the educational channel, the experience is “very good,” adding that all programs and lessons are optimized.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Feature: Syrian refugees experience tough Ramadan amid COVID-19 outbreak

Published

on

Dalal Abu Nawfal, a Syrian refugee in her 50’s from Aleppo, was busy washing her three children’s clothes as a gift of the holy month of Ramadan after the COVID-19 spread prevented them from buying a new one.

Abu Nawfal, who was wearing a mask made by herself, told Xinhua that COVID-19 turned the happiness of her and her kids into misery.

“Our only concern is to adhere to the quarantine properly to prevent the virus from attacking our camps. We are no longer concerned about securing our basic food needs for Ramadan but only to overcome this unexpected crisis,” she said.

Salam Abu Al-Majd, a refugee from Idlib who was making masks for her family by using old clothes, told Xinhua that the prevention mask is the best gift during this holy month, after the increase in its price amid low availability of masks in pharmacies.

Syrian refugees residing in Lebanon have gone through very tough time ever since their arrival to the country following the eruption of the civil war in Syria.

Most of the Syrian refugees who flew to Lebanon live in dispersed tents all over the country without enough financial support to make it through the month or even to secure means for heating their tents in the cold and stormy winter weather of Lebanon.

Syrian refugees have previously received support from several countries in addition to the United Nations Higher Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

However, this year’s Ramadan, with the outbreak of COVID-19, worsened refugees’ dire living conditions.

“This is the most difficult Ramadan since we flew from Syria to Lebanon,” Maher Abu Jumaili, a refugee from Idlib, told Xinhua.

Abu Jumaili said that Ramadan used to be a happy occasion that gathers people in the camps with love while allowing them to be better acquainted with each other.

“This year, we do not even have the humble luxury to forget our misery,” he said.

Meanwhile, Akram al-Amiri, a displaced from Aleppo, said he was fired from his work at a chicken farm.

“We feel, like all other refugees, that this is the worst Ramadan because of the current economic crisis and weakening of the Lebanese pound in parallel to the tremendous increase in prices and absence of support by international organizations,” he said.

Lebanon has been facing a very difficult economic and financial crisis over the shortage in U.S. dollars which increased demand on the currency and weakened the Lebanese pounds, causing difficulties for people all over the country to afford purchasing their basic food needs.

“We have used all of our food stocks and savings during our quarantine because of the lack in support by international organizations,” Samira Al-Subaihi, another Syrian refugee, told Xinhua.

Coinciding with the holy month of Ramadan, the UNHCR launched on April 23 a global fundraising campaign called “Every Gift Counts” to help raise funds for the most vulnerable refugees.

The campaign aims to raise funds, through donations including Zakat and Sadaqah, to help provide lifesaving support such as shelter, food, clean water and monthly cash assistance, to the most vulnerable refugee.

According to the UNHCR, this is the agency’s second global Ramadan campaign which focuses on the small but incredible changes that individuals can bring to refugee families during this holy month.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Syrian vocational institutes make masks amid COVID-19 infections

Published

on

Syrian vocational institutions are making face masks as part of protection against COVID-19.

Run by the Syrian Education Ministry, vocational institutes started making masks as the education in these facilities had been suspended as part of the government’s measures to curb the spread of COVID-19.

In one institute in the Mazzeh area west of Damascus, teachers come every day to make the masks since the growing demand for protection masks amid the high prices of the imported ones.

Sitting behind sewing machines, the teachers cut fabrics and make them in the shape of masks before finishing and packing them in plastic bags.

Razan al-Rai, a sewing teacher, told Xinhua that she used to teach students how to make clothes, but now she was making masks to “help the society.”

She said it’s the duty of every person to volunteer to help the country and the people.

“We do all we can and we are making masks. We feel happy because we are doing something humanitarian to help the people and society,” she said.

For his side, Sulaiman Younes, director of Damascus education directorate, told Xinhua that they finished the first stage of production by making 12,000 masks, adding that they make around 3,000 masks per day.

He said the Education Ministry and the vocational education directorate must play a social role by confronting the virus.

“We have the ability to provide masks for protection and this is an opportunity to prove that we are active in society.”

Syria has recorded a total of 42 COVID-19 infections, with 11 recoveries and three deaths, according to the health ministry.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

7,500 Turkey-backed Syrian rebels reach Libya

Published

on

As many as 7,500 Turkey-backed Syrian rebels reached the Libyan territories to join the UN-backed Libyan government’s fight against the east-based army, a war monitor reported on Saturday.

Another 2,500 rebels are currently receiving training in Turkish camps, said the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

A total of 223 rebels have so far been killed in the battles in Libya, said the Britain-based watchdog group.

The Turkey-backed rebels opened four centers in the northern Syrian city of Afrin to recruit fighters to be sent to Libya.

Turkey offers a monthly salary of 2,000 U.S. dollars for those who agree to go to Libya on contracts between three and six months, said the observatory.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Syrian, Chinese experts share anti-coronavirus experiences via online conference

Published

on

A video-conference was held on Thursday between Chinese and Syrian medical experts for sharing the experiences to fight the COVID-19 pandemic.

At the conference, promoted by the Chinese embassy in Syria, Chinese experts from Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital affiliated with Zhejiang University School of Medicine shared their experiences and practices with nine experts from the Syrian health sector.

The Chinese experts elaborated on their experiences ranging from epidemiological characteristics, prevention and control strategies, clinical diagnosis and treatment, to close tracking of the novel coronavirus.

In-depth exchanges were also conducted by both sides.

Following the meeting, Syria’s Deputy Health Minister Ahmed Khlifawi said that Syrian experts learned a lot from the useful experiences from their Chinese counterparts.

He described this as an “important” meeting held in time to solve the current problems encountered by Syria in terms of diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19.

“I hope that the two sides will hold regular conferences and exchange mechanisms in the future,” Khlifawi said.

For his part, Chinese Ambassador to Syria Feng Biao said that the Syrian government and people provided vigorous support and help to China at the beginning of the virus outbreak, which has been kept in mind by the Chinese people.

Further elaborating on the pandemic, Feng stressed that the virus has no borders and no race, adding that humanity is a community of the shared destiny.

Only through uniting and cooperating can the international community overcome the pandemic, he pointed out.

“I believe that with the help of friendly countries such as China, the Syrian people will be able to overcome the pandemic,” the Chinese diplomat said.

Thursday’s conference was the second held between Chinese and Syrian experts since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In a video-conference on March 26, Chinese medical experts shared their expertise in combating coronavirus with their counterparts from several Middle East countries including Libya, Turkey, Lebanon and Syria.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Chinese organizations provide donations to Syrian refugees in Lebanon

Published

on

Two Chinese non-profit organizations, Peaceland Foundation and Common Future Fund, provided on Monday humanitarian aid to Syrian refugees in Lebanon to help them fight against COVID-19.

Zhan Weizhen, project officer at Peaceland Foundation and a volunteer for Common Future Fund, said the two organizations provided refugees with some basic hygiene products and daily necessities.

“The two organizations provided, with the help of local NGOs, disinfectants, sanitizers, rice, flour and cooking oil to 100 families including 500 refugees in camps located in Beirut and Bekaa,” Zhan said.

Ghazi Sharif, Mayor of Faour town in Zahle, thanked the organizations for their donations which came on time to meet some of the needs of refugees amid a severe economic crisis in the country and the outbreak of COVID-19.

Meanwhile, Fadi Mhanna, owner of a camp’s land in Faour, said refugees live in a very dire situation in absence of jobs.

“We need support in greater quantities because people are living in very bad conditions,” he said.

Chinese companies and expatriates in Lebanon have previously donated medical equipment to help Lebanon in its fight against COVID-19.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

40 truckloads of Syrian rebels reach Turkey: report

Published

on

A total of 40 pickup trucks carrying Syrian rebels reached the Turkish territories on Monday from northern Syria, state news agency SANA reported.

The vehicles moved from near the city of Ras al-Ayn in the countryside of Hasakah province toward the Turkish territories, said the report.

It also said that the Turkish forces brought in three big trucks carrying logistics and military gears to areas in northern Syria, as part of the Turkish ongoing operation to consolidate its positions in northern Syria.

Earlier in the day, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights war monitor said as many as 5,300 Turkey-backed Syrian rebels have so far reached Libya to fight alongside the UN-backed Libyan government against the rival east-based army.

Another 2,100 rebels are currently receiving training in Turkish camps, as Turkey is sending the Syrian rebels to Libya, said the Observatory.

As many as 199 rebels have so far been killed in the battles in Libya, said the UK-based watchdog group.

The Turkey-backed rebels opened four centers in the northern Syrian city of Afrin to recruit fighters to be sent to Libya.

Turkey offers a monthly salary of 2,000 U.S. dollars for those who agree to go to Libya on contracts between three and six months, according to the watchdog group.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Syrian army finds Western-made weapons in southern region

Published

on

The Syrian army on Monday confiscated some U.S. and Western-made weapons in the countryside of the capital Damascus and southern province of Quneitra, state news agency SANA reported.

The weapons were found as the Syrian army was combing formerly rebel-held areas in the southwestern countryside of Damascus and the countryside of Quneitra province, said SANA.

Among the seized weapons were anti-tank missile, RPGs, rifles, Western and U.S.-made submachine guns, hand grenades, satellite broadcasting, telecommunication devices, medicines, and medical equipment in addition to a number of stolen cars.

SANA said that over the past few months, the Syrian army confiscated large amounts of Israeli and U.S. weapons in the southern region.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Iranian FM meets Syrian president in Damascus

Published

on

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad met with the visiting Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in the capital Damascus on Monday, the state news agency SANA reported.

According to SANA, Assad lamented how the coronavirus has become a way for political investment by the Western countries, mainly the United States, which continues to impose sanctions on Iran and Syria amid the COVID-19 crisis.

For his side, Zarif said the U.S. has shown its “inhuman nature” to the world by refusing to lift the economic siege off Syria and Iran.

Both sides also discussed the work of the Syrian constitutional committee, which is tasked with amending and revising the Syrian constitution.

They also discussed the upcoming Astana talks on Syria between Russia, Turkey, and Iran, slated for Wednesday.

SANA said Zarif also slammed the Western attempts to accuse the Syrian army of carrying out chemical attacks in previous battles with the rebels.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Russian jet chases U.S. plane from Syrian facilities: military

Published

on

A Russian fighter jet drove a U.S. reconnaissance aircraft away from Russian military facilities in Syria on Sunday, the Russian Defense Ministry said Monday.

Russian radars detected a flying object over the neutral waters of the Mediterranean Sea, which was heading toward Russian military facilities, the ministry’s Zvezda broadcasting service said.

A Russian fighter jet took off from the Hmeimim airbase and identified the target as a U.S. spy plane and started to follow it, the ministry said.

After the U.S. aircraft changed its course and flew away, the Russian jet returned to the base.

On Sunday, the U.S. Navy issued a statement complaining that a Russian Su-35 fighter had intercepted a U.S. P-8A surveillance plane over the Mediterranean Sea in an “unsafe and unprofessional” manner, though the Russian Defense Ministry said its Aerospace Forces always carry out flights in compliance with international rules.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

5,300 Syrian rebels fight in Libya: monitor

Published

on

As many as 5,300 Turkey-backed Syrian rebels have so far reached Libya to fight alongside the UN-backed Libyan government in its fight against the east-based army led by Khalifa Haftar, a war monitor reported on Monday.

Another 2,100 rebels are currently receiving training in Turkish camps, as Turkey is sending the Syrian rebels to Libya, said the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

As many as 199 rebels have so far been killed in the battles in Libya, said the UK-based watchdog group.

The Turkey-backed rebels opened four centers in the northern Syrian city of Afrin to recruit fighters to be sent to Libya.

Turkey offers a monthly salary of 2,000 U.S. dollars for those who agree to go to Libya on contracts between three and six months, according to the London-based watchdog.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Feature: Syrian tailors turn from clothes-making to medical masks, overalls 

Published

on

As the COVID-19 crisis and the curfew that ensued have affected most businesses, several Syrian tailors have opted to cope with the situation by turning from making regular clothes to making masks and protective overalls for medical staffers.

The tailors came together through workshops supervised by a local social initiative called Sa’ed, or Help, intending to help the medical staff in Damascus through making affordable and competitive medical masks and overalls amid the high prices of the imported equipment.

A total of four workshops cooperate with Sa’ed to make the masks and overalls and every workshop benefits around 16 families of the tailors who work with them.

Despite that the tailors don’t make as much money as they used to before the coronavirus crisis, for them, it’s better than doing nothing at all.

Tareq al-Tawil, a tailor, told Xinhua that he was encouraged to work on making medical overalls after his original work was suspended during the virus crisis.

“When the coronavirus crisis began, our jobs stopped and later we got the opportunity to work from home, so we started making overalls to help ourselves first because lots of businesses have stopped and I have obligations and family to feed,” he said.

For her side, Bushra Iriqsousi, a woman running a tailoring workshop, told Xinhua that her workshop used to make cotton outfits before working in making masks and overalls.

She said that a group of tailors was quickly trained to make masks to meet the needs of people.

The tailors in Iriqsousi’s workshop were working feverishly to produce more masks, which are being sold to hospitals and medical teams at cheap prices.

Issam Habbal, head of the Sa’ed group, said that the initiative has succeeded in terms of being non-profitable as it targets the buyers directly without mediators.

He said the tailors have succeeded as they have decided to sell their products to hospitals, medical associations, and individuals in a bid to provide these types of equipment at relatively cheaper prices.

He said the new initiative has offered job opportunities for many tailors.

Such initiatives are helping during these times as the Syrian health ministry said on Friday that 38 COVID-19 cases had so far been reported in the country. It also said that five have recovered and two died.

  

1 2 3 4 Next  

Continue Reading

Foreign

Ankara vows retaliation if Syrian govt violates Idlib ceasefire

Published

on

Turkey’s Foreign Minister, Mevlut Cavusoglu, on Tuesday warned that his country will retaliate if Syrian government forces violate the Idlib ceasefire deal.

Speaking with Turkey’s Anadolu news agency, the foreign minister said the ceasefire would help protect civilians in the militant-controlled Syrian province.

Commenting on the details of the Russia-brokered ceasefire in Idlib, Cavusoglu said that under its terms, the Turkish military would patrol north of the security corridor along the strategic M4 highway.

He added that Russian forces would also be patrolling its southern side.

Cavusoglu also commented on the Turkish request for the deployment of U.S. Patriot missile systems along the country’s southern borders.

According to the foreign minister, Turkey’s possession of Russian-made S-400 missile systems were “not an obstacle” to the deployment of the U.S. systems.

On Monday, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told reporters that he had asked Turkey’s NATO allies for “additional assistance on Syria for the defence of the border, and in connection with the migration challenge’’.

President Donald Trump of U.S. revealed on March 1 that he had been speaking with his Turkish counterpart about Ankara’s request for Patriot missile systems amid the situation in Idlib.

Earlier, U.S. Ambassador to Turkey, David Satterfield, said these discussions were still ongoing.

In his interview, Cavusoglu said the U.S. has already provided Turkey with land, sea and air intelligence on Idlib.

Edited By: Hadiza Mohammed/Abdulfatah Babatunde
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Latest News