Connect with us

General news

Adopt sociological inquiry to tackle insecurity, Forum urges Buhari

Published

on

A pressure group,Yoruba Ronu Leadership Forum, has urged President Muhammadu Buhari to set up sociological inquiry as a way of tackling banditry and insurgency in the country.

The Forum said this in a statement signed on Wednesday by its President, Mr Akin Malaolu, while recalling that the president had earlier contemplated the stratagem whose time had come for implementation.

According to Malaolu, since use of force has not yielded desired result, there is need to interrogate the causes and address them appropriately.

“At this stage of our security condition, government must as a duty patronise the academia to help find out the reasons for Islamic insurgency, banditry and other impunity.

“The findings and results can add more to our knowledge of why humans commit crimes

that are bestial.

“It must be noted that it is only government that can fund researches in any nation and

Nigeria can’t be an exception.

“We recall President Buhari promised to setup a sociological inquiry way back in 2016 at the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) security summit held in Togo.

“ The summit was held to address activities of Islamic insurgents that were killing, kidnapping and bombing human settlements.

“We are sad over the continued shedding of blood, spasm of communal clashes and other heinous crimes that have defied quality solutions as well as holding the nation down.

“This spate of insecurity, if not curtailed can assume a revolutionary trend due to negative

comments on the government,” he said.

The group said it shared Buhari’s view on enquiry and made efforts towards achieving the objective, noting that only government could make the nation to benefit from it.

“We as a responsible cultural and leadership forum had in September 2017 submitted the modalities for sociological research to the presidency for its consideration, but to date nothing has been heard.

“Today, we can all see at a glance that government administrators are at their wits end while the masses are in sorrow and fear.”

Malaolu said nations around the world had been adopting such measures to solve peculiar problems.

“In 1945, the then Republic of Sudan called in a sociologist by the name Nadal to help find out

the reasons for separatist movements in Sudan.”

However, the group commended Buhari-led administration for its untiring efforts to stem insecurity in the nation, saying no one should play politics with the situation.

“We must caution leaders across the nation not to play politics with our collective difficulties at this stage; it will be irresponsible to do so.

“Our prayers go to those who lost loved ones to this general madness (insecurity) and to those in pain, we pray that God heals all in good speed,” he said.

According to him, the nation’s security forces are combating Boko haram insurgency in North-East which has pledged allegiance to foreign terrorist group, ISIS, in addition to banditry and kidnapping in the country.

Foreign

Kenya coffee farmers adopt home processing to seek better prices

Published

on

By

Some small-scale coffee farmers in Kenya have started processing their coffee to protect the quality, aiming to get a share of the lucrative premium export market where quality coffee beans fetch a premium price.

Data from the Nairobi Coffee Exchange shows that top quality coffee known as AA grade fetched up to 45,326 shillings (about 427 United States dollars) per 50-kg bag compared to a price of 199 dollars fetched by the majority of the coffee during the auction that ended on May 24th.

Samuel Muchiri, 44, a farmer in Kirinyaga County in central Kenya is among small-scale farmers who have embraced home-based processing to avoid mixing their coffee with the rest of farmers in order to maintain quality and therefore get a better price.

“Coffee has money. But it needs to be of high-quality coffee. That is why I decided to do home processing to ensure I maintain high quality,” Muchiri told Xinhua on Friday at his farm.

When the coffee is processed at home, it is then taken to a miller where it is also milled separately and then graded ready for auction in the capital Nairobi or direct export.

Traditionally in Kenya, green harvested coffee is taken to a common processing factory owned by farmers where different grades are mixed.

Although grading happens later when the coffee is milled, the final payment is usually an average of the price fetched by all the grades, meaning that those farmers who have to take care of their coffee to get a better grade are not rewarded.

According to Muchiri, processing his coffee at home has enabled him to earn at least double and sometimes triple the amount of money earned by other farmers who sell through the cooperative societies.

“My coffee goes to the market as organically grown and therefore specialty coffee, which fetches a premium,” he said.

Gichuki Wambari, 54, from Nyeri County also in central Kenya, said he invested some 1,000 dollars in machinery to process his coffee.

“The pay from home processed coffee is better than processing and selling collectively,” he said.

He said although he is yet to establish a stable market for his coffee which he processes and then outsources the milling services, he is realizing better returns.

Home processing is part of the ongoing formal and informal reforms taking place in the coffee industry which was once Kenya’s largest foreign exchange earner.

President Uhuru Kenyatta appointed a committee to advise and steer reforms in the industry in 2016. The final report from the committee will be ready in July, said its head, Joseph Kieyah.

Kenya’s ministry of agriculture has also been pursuing new markets for coffee in China and the Middle East to reduce dependency on the traditional European market.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Politics

It’s up to states to choose type of guber primary to adopt, says Edo APC Chairman

Published

on

The Chairman of the APC in Edo, Chief Anselem Ojezua, affirmed on Thursday that the State Executive Council (SEC) of the party has the responsibility to determine the option to follow in the primaries to choose a governorship candidate.

Ojezua gave the clarification in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria in Benin, amid the raging tussle between the two factions of the APC in Edo.

The two factions have been at odds on the type of process to be adopted on the Edo governorship primaries, coming up later this month.

Ojezua said it was up to various state chapters of the party to decide which option was acceptable to them, based on peculiarities in their states.

According to him, the Constitution of the APC, however, recognizes both the direct and indirect form of primaries.

He explained that it was based on this that the National Working Committee of the party came out with a time-table that made SEC to meet with critical stakeholders to take a decision to adopt  indirect primaries, based on peculiarities in Edo.

Ojezua noted that this was so because of the measures, protocols and rules put in place by both the federal and state governments, regarding crowding, social distancing and other measures to deal with COVID-19.

“The need to protect the health and safety of our members as well as those who would be exposed as they travel back and forth the 192 wards and later converging in the state capital would make all the gains and restraints in curtailing the spread of COVID-19 a wasted effort if direct primaries was adopted.

“So we felt it would be better to go to one location that is large enough to accommodate the total number of delegates while preserving the requirements for social distancing.

Samuel Ogbemudia Stadium was suggested because it has a sitting capacity of 15,000, whereas the total delegates are not more than 3,600. So social distancing is assured and transparency too.”

Ojezua recalled that that the last governorship primaries was held at the same venue, using the same indirect method.

“Why change it now? The event was peaceful and transparent that time. There was no issue.

“Now, there is hostility and suspicion.’’

Ojezua said that what was important was that the decision on what form of primary to adopt was best for the states to make and that what the SEC in Edo had done was in compliance with that decision.

The APC chief expressed his optimism on the chances of incumbent Governor Godwin Obaseki clinching the ticket of the party in the primaries, slated for June 22.

He said that the governor had performed well to be rewarded with another term in office.

“Obaseki has brought civility, decency and development to the state in his administration.

In 2016, we had 14 aspirants and 11 took forms and he defeated them. The result of this one won’t be different,” said Ojezua.

Five aspirants have so far obtained the party’s expression of interest form, to contest the primaries, a check by NAN correspondent showed.


Edited By: Silas Nwoha (NAN)

 

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Foreign

Kenyans adopt new greeting habits amid coronavirus pandemic

Published

on

As COVID-19 cases take an upward trend in Kenya, reaching 2,093 on Tuesday, citizens are adopting new greeting habits, such as elbow bumps, which are helping people socialise as they maintain hygiene and keep social distance to curb the spread of the disease.

With handshakes, hugs, cheek kisses, and shoulder bumps among other forms of salutations dead, thanks to the new coronavirus pandemic, new forms of greetings considered safer are taking root in Kenya, both in official and informal circles.

One such a greeting that is taking the east African nation by storm is elbow bump as citizens consider it much safer.

From the old to the young, men and women, elbow bumps have now become the official greetings of Kenyans both in formal and informal settings like homes.

President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy William Ruto cemented the greeting in Kenya’s formal circles on Monday when they used it during independence celebrations in Nairobi, the capital.

Wearing masks, clenching their fists and smiling, Kenyatta and Ruto bumped their elbows to greet each other.

Their greeting did not only acknowledge the popularity of the salutation amid the pandemic, but it also confirmed to citizens that they can use it.

Several dignitaries at the event that was attended by few government officials and opposition leaders also used the elbow bump to greet each other.

“I have been using the elbow bump since last month.

“Some people have been comfortable with it, others are not, avoiding contact but when I saw the president use it on Monday, I felt happy, that this is the greeting for those of us who are used to handshakes,” said Gilbert Wandera, a businessman in Nairobi.

Wandera, who sells computers, had shunned any form of contact greeting when the disease broke out to maintain hygiene.

But I changed my mind as people embraced face masks and other sanitation measures.

“Besides, elbow bumps are a little safer because chances that you will touch your face with the elbow are nil,” he said.

The greeting has also been embraced in households, corporate offices, operators of public transport vehicles commonly known as matatus, commuters, motorbike taxi riders and traders among others as it quenches citizens’ thirst to shake hands.

Besides elbow bumps, other forms of greetings that Kenyans are using include foot taps and hand on my heart – what the World Health Organisation recommends.

But these are not as popular as elbow bumps.

Another culture that has taken root in the east African nation, thanks to the pandemic is the wearing of face masks.

Initially, wearing of masks was seen as a mark of style mainly done by the sophisticated or wealthy, but it has now been embraced by all citizens, with thousands hardly venturing out of their houses without the gadget.

“I am also finding myself maintaining the 1.5m social distance in public places naturally.

“No one is reminding me to keep distance in supermarkets, at ATMs, in public transport vehicles or in the office.

“And this is what many other people are doing.

“It is now a culture that is helping curb the disease,” said Victoria Selima, a government auditor.

Initially, funerals in the east African nation would attract hundreds of people, some who would stay at the affected families’ homes for days mourning.

But with COVID-19, citizens have learnt to keep away from the events without being forced by government officials, noted Victor Mulanda, who traveled to western Kenya on Monday from the capital for a funeral.

Rashid Aman, Kenya’s health chief administrative secretary, noted Tuesday that citizens must be responsible and embrace new norms to beat the disease that is currently deeply entrenched in community across the east African nation.

Edited By: Emmanuel Yashim (NAN)

Continue Reading

Health

COVID-19: Expert urges Nigerians to adopt cashless payment systems

Published

on

A medical expert, Dr Chijioke Asogwa, has advised Nigerians to adopt cashless payment systems to keep and stay safe this period of COVID-19 pandemic.

Asogwa, who is the Board Chairman of Enugu State Primary Health Care Development Agency (ENS-PHCDA), gave the advice while speaking with News Agency of Nigeria in Enugu on Wednesday.

He noted that the advocacy on use of cashless payment systems, which was in conformity to the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) cashless policy, had become necessary to curb the spread of COVID-19 in communities in the country.

According to him, since the cash or paper money has surface, the same surface can also act as medium of spread.

Asogwa, a public health physician, said anyone that handle cash infected with the virus through human sneezing, coughing or mouth liquid droplets can get infected unknowingly through this process.

“As we are in the community transmission of the virus, one must be very careful to always monitor the surfaces he or she touches including touching surfaces of money.

“I advocate that all Nigerians should adopt the CBN cashless policy.

“This is a situation where one does all his or her monetary transactions electronically, by monetary/payment online transfers, ATM transfers and POS among others without touching physical cash.

“As we are in the community transmission stage of the virus, it is difficult for you to know or trace where the cash or physical money you want to collect is coming from.

“As far as the physical cash has a surface it can be infected with the virus even through asymptomatic patients of COVID-19.

Asymptomatic patients of COVID-19 are healthy carriers of the virus that show no sign of having the virus and they go about their daily business mingling with people and touching cash as well,’’ he said.

The health expert urged Nigerians to be circumspect in all they do and follow strictly NCDC and health ministry directives.

“As a matter of necessity, you must take personal responsibility for your health and that of your family members this season,’’ he added.


Edited By: Edwin Nwachukwu/Felix Ajide (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Roundup: Kenyans adopt new greeting habits amid COVID-19 pandemic

Published

on

By

As COVID-19 cases take an upward trend in Kenya, reaching 2,093 on Tuesday, citizens are adopting new greeting habits, such as elbow bumps, which are helping people socialize as they maintain hygiene and keep social distance to curb the spread of the disease.

With handshakes, hugs, cheek kisses and shoulder bumps among other forms of salutations dead, thanks to the new coronavirus disease pandemic, new forms of greetings considered safer are taking root in Kenya, both in official and informal circles.

One such a greeting that is taking the east African nation by storm is elbow bump as citizens consider it much safer.

From the old to the young, men and women, elbow bumps have now become the official greetings of Kenyans both in formal and informal settings like homes.

President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy William Ruto cemented the greeting in Kenya’s formal circles on Monday when they used it during independence celebrations in Nairobi, the capital.

Wearing masks, clenching their fists and smiling, Kenyatta and Ruto bumped their elbows to greet each other.

Their greeting did not only acknowledge the popularity of the salutation amid the pandemic, but it also confirmed to citizens that they can use it.

Several dignitaries at the event that was attended by few government officials and opposition leaders also used the elbow bump to greet each other.

“I have been using the elbow bump since last month, some people have been comfortable with it, others are not, avoiding contact but when I saw the president use it on Monday, I felt happy, that this is the greeting for those of us who are used to handshakes,” said Gilbert Wandera, a businessman in Nairobi.

Wandera, who sells computers, had shunned any form of contact greeting when the disease broke out to maintain hygiene.

But I changed my mind as people embraced face masks and other sanitation measures. Besides, elbow bumps are a little safer because chances that you will touch your face with the elbow are nil,” he said.

The greeting has also been embraced in households, corporate offices, operators of public transport vehicles commonly known as matatus, commuters, motorbike taxi riders and traders among others as it quenches citizens’ thirst to shake hands.

Besides elbow bumps, other forms of greetings that Kenyans are using include foot taps and hand on my heart, what the World Health Organization recommends. But these are not as popular as elbow bumps.

Another culture that has taken root in the east African nation, thanks to the pandemic is the wearing of face masks. Initially, wearing of masks was seen as a mark of style mainly done by the sophisticated or wealthy, but it has now been embraced by all citizens, with thousands hardly venturing out of their houses without the gadget.

“I am also finding myself maintaining the 1.5m social distance in public places naturally. No one is reminding me to keep distance in supermarkets, at ATMs, in public transport vehicles or in the office. And this is what many other people are doing. It is now a culture that is helping curb the disease,” said Victoria Selima, a government auditor.

Initially, funerals in the east African nation would attract hundreds of people, some who would stay at the affected families’ homes for days mourning.

But with COVID-19, citizens have learnt to keep away from the events without being forced by government officials, noted Victor Mulanda, who traveled to western Kenya on Monday from the capital for a funeral.

Rashid Aman, Kenya‘s health chief administrative secretary, noted Tuesday that citizens must be responsible and embrace new norms to beat the disease that is currently deeply entrenched in community across the east African nation.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Metro

ICAO adopts new COVID-19 aviation recovery ‘Take Off’ guidelines to reconnect the world

Published

on

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) has adopted a new report and recommendations aimed at restarting international air transport system and aligning its global recovery.

ICAO Council President, Mr Salvatore Sciacchitano, revealed this on the official tweeter handle of the organisation @icao.

According to the president, the COVID-19 report and guidelines were produced by the Council Aviation Recovery Task Force (CART).

He said the report and guidelines were developed through broad-based consultations with countries and regional organisations, and with important advice from the World Health Organisation.

He noted that the key aviation industry groups including; International Air Transport Association (IATA), Airports Council International (ACI World), Civil Air Navigation Services Organisation (CANSO), and the International Coordinating Council of Aerospace Industries Associations (ICCAIA).

“The world looked to the ICAO Council to provide the high-level guidance which governments and industry needed to begin restarting international air transport and recovering from COVID-19.

“We have answered this call today with the delivery of this report, and with its recommendations and Take-Off guidelines which will now align public and private sector actions and mitigations as we get the world flying again.

“Also, in full accordance with the latest and most prudent medical and traveller health advice available to us. The world needs aviation and aviation today is in great need of ICAO,” Sciacchitano said.

He said global cooperation through the organisation had helped countries to connect the world to their mutual benefit for over 75 years which as well now helping to reconnect the world.

He noted that solidarity among all countries and regions and industry sectors would be critical going forward, pointing out that ICAO was where to achieve the goal for global aviation.

CART Chairperson, Amb. Philippe Bertoux, noted that the CART guidelines were intended to inform, align and progress the national, regional, and industry-specific COVID-19 recovery roadmaps now being implemented, but not to replace them.

“These guidelines will facilitate convergence, mutual recognition and harmonisation of aviation COVID-19 related measures across the globe. They are intended to support the restart and recovery of global air travel in a safe, secure and sustainable way.

“In order to be effective, we need to take a layered and especially a risk-based approach. Measures will be implemented or removed as needed based on the wide ranging medical and other factors which will be at play,” Bertoux said.

Bertoux, who was also representative of France to the ICAO Council, said countries and operators needed autonomy and certainty as they took action to get the world flying again.

According to him, the CART guidelines are therefore designed to serve in both these capacities as a common reference, while remaining adaptable.

He said CART guidelines was a type of ‘living guidance’ which would be continuously updated based on latest risk assessments of the progress monitored to reconnect the world.

He said CART’s report contained a detailed situational analysis and key principles supported by a series of recommendations focused around objectives for public health, aviation safety and security, and aviation economic recovery.

He reinstated that the content was supplemented by the report’s special ‘Take Off’ document which contained guidelines for public health risk mitigation measures and four separate modules relating to airports, aircraft, crew, and air cargo.

ICAO Secretary-General, Dr Fang Liu, welcomed the CART’s accomplishment and highlighted that ICAO would continue to develop implementation packages to assist member states to restart the operations and recovery.

“Restoring public confidence in air travel has very broad benefits. This isn’t only about operational and economic viability of air transport sector, but of entire societies and regions having their economic livelihoods and stability restored.

The full CART Report is available as part of ICAO’s COVID-19 platform, and will be regularly reviewed and updated based on the latest data and information received from all stakeholders,’’ she said.


Edited By: Edwin Nwachukwu/Sadiya Hamza (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Kenyan farmers mark global milk day amid calls for adoption of climate-smart animals

Published

on

By

Kenyan dairy farmers on Monday joined their counterparts from across the globe to mark the World Milk Day as experts rooted for adoption of more hardy animals to enhance production amid challenges of climate change.

The day was founded some 20 years ago by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations to distinguish the importance of milk as a food and to celebrate the dairy sector.

This year, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, FAO discouraged the holding of in-person events, calling for social media celebrations.

After milking their animals on Monday, some of the dairy farmers in the east African nation toasted their produce in celebration of resilience and hope for more production amid rising challenges.

East African nation milk producers are currently facing a myriad of challenges among them shrinking land sizes, erratic weather conditions due to climate change and restrictions to curb the spread of new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) that have shrunk the market.

Climate change effects have led to erratic pasture production and increased disease and pest incidences.

But still, the farmers have been resilient, producing up to 60 million liters of milk a month or 720 million liters annually, according to the Kenya Dairy Board.

Rachel Kinyua, a farmer from Meru County in central Kenya, is among those earning a living from milk that her six cows, out of the 15 she keeps, produce.

She gets 160 litres of milk every day and delivers to the Meru Union Dairy Cooperative Society, which buys at 35 shillings (about 0.35 United States dollars) per liter.

“I am happy with the yield but I want to increase the number of milkers to 10, though challenges like severe drought affect production,” Kinyua, who keeps Friesian animals, which are very high feeders, said.

But as dairy production goes on, experts are calling for adoption of climate-smart animals that are not only hardy but also offer more on less feeds.

These include dairy goats, crossbreed cows, camels and sheep. For the goats, crossbreeds of Alpines and Toggenburgs — European breeds — have emerged as the most popular among Kenyan farmers seeking to produce more milk.

Similarly, crossbreeds of Sahiwals, Fleckvieh and local breed Zebu cattle have also been embraced by dairy farmers in the east African nation.

For sheep, farmers are embracing crossbreeds of traditional Red Maasai, Boer and Dorper, the last two which are resilient and imported from South Africa.

Camels, on the other hand, are being adopted by farmers in arid and semi-arid areas due to their hardy nature.

Initially, the animals were mainly kept in northern Kenya but more farmers in the south, Coast and eastern parts of the country are embracing camels as their milk products like yogurt, fresh milk and meat become mainstreamed in the east African nation’s market.

There are at least three million camels in Kenya, mostly kept by pastoralists in the north, with the number growing steadily over recent years.

George Gitao, a professor of veterinary medicine at the University of Nairobi, noted camels are more important now than ever because they are tough, survive in drought and pollute less.

“Camels produce one of the most nutritious milks and the world‘s best wools, good leather and extremely healthy meat,” he said.

Bernard Faye, a veterinarian and chair of the International Society of Camelid Research and Development, observed that the global camel market is projected to grow at more than 10 percent for the next decade, thus, farmers must produce more of its milk and meat in the future to reap from the animals.

Besides the resilient livestock, experts are advising for adoption of hardy but nutritious fodder that helps in production of more milk from the animals.

These fodder include panicum, cobra and cayman grasses that are not only nutritious to animals but also regrow faster after cutting, thus, allowing farmers to have plenty of fodder even with little rains, according to Fredrick Muthomi, an agronomist.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Health

Kano Govt adopts measures to prevent spread of COVID-19 in worship centres

Published

on

The Kano State Government says it has put in place measures to prevent the spread of coronavirus in worship centres across the state.
The state’s Commissioner for Environment, Dr Kabiru Getso, said this in a statement signed by the Public Relations Officer of the Ministry Mr Abbas Habib on Saturday in Kano.
“To prevent the spread of coronavirus during Friday and Sunday prayers in the state, Gov. Abdullahi Ganduje has provided more facemasks and sanitation facilities to additional 430 worship centres across the state,” he said.
The Commissioner, however, called on the Imams and Pastors to continue to cooperate with the government, in its bid to educate residents on preventive measures against the coronavirus desease.
“Coronavirus is real and government will not condone inciting sermons that will throw people into doubting the disease,” he said.
Getso said the government had deployed 5,513 Sanitation Vanguards, Hisba Corps and other religious guards for distribution of facemasks and other sanitation facilities to Mosques and Churches to ensure compliance with the developed guidelines during the prayers and church services.
He said that about 430,000 facemasks, 3,000 detol soaps and 500 bottles of hand sanitisers have been distributed to Mosques and Churches.
The state government had on May 17, allowed the resumption of Friday prayers and Church services in the state.

Edited By: Ali Baba-Inuwa (NAN)

Continue Reading

General news

Ease of Doing Business: Lagos adopts digital physical planning reforms

Published

on

To enhance the ease of doing business, the Lagos State Government on Thursday said it was adopting various reforms to boost physical planning services and public confidence.

The state’s Commissioner for Physical Planning and Urban Development, Dr Idris Salako, said this during the annual ministerial press briefing to mark the first anniversary of the Babajide Sanwo-Olu’s administration.

Salako said part of the reform mechanism led to the inauguration of experts in the Lagos State Physical Planning and Building Control Appeals Committee to handle petitions on contraventions of the extant urban development laws.

He listed other reforms to include passage of a new regulation, tagged the ‘Lagos State Physical Planning and Building Control Reglations 2019’, to serve as guideline for the operations of two agencies.

The agencies are the Lagos State Physical Planning Permit Authority (LASPPPA) and the Lagos State Building Control Agency (LASBCA), which were saddled with responsibilities of enhancing seamless operations.

Other reforms are the devolution of Planning Permit Approval Powers and the creation of more district offices to fast track approval process and enhance the ease of doing business in Lagos State.

It also include digitisation of the processes of the ministry and its agencies to ensure adoption and compliance with electronic technology in order to enhance its performance.

The Ministry has received and is currently considering proposals for the application of change detection technology, Geo Satellite Images and data for monitoring and tracking changes in developmental activities with a view to detecting and discouraging illegal development,” he said.

Salako said that the reforms were intended to ensure smooth running of operations of the ministry and its agencies to enhance the sustainability of the environment.

He said the policy was assisting in the delivery of the mandate of the ministry, especially the issuance of planning permits, carrying out regulatory and other activities.

Salako added that to further enhance the ease of doing business, the government had rejuvenated the Electronic Planning Permit (epp.) platform and had received 232 applications through the platform.

He explained that the Ministry, through the Lagos State Physical Planning Permit Authority (LASPPPA), granted a total of 2,366 approvals for various uses including commercial, mixed use, institutional and hotel, agricultural uses, among others.

He said the Ministry of Physical Planning and Urban Development facilitated actualisation of the Lagos Island Revitalisation project by clearing and delivering it to the Ministry of Health.

The commissioner explained that the site meant for health facility was on Adeniji-Adele Road, adding that the old Jankara Market was cleared and delivered for other state development projects.

Salako said that the aim of the Lagos Island Revitalisation project was to address the issue of over-stretched basic infrastructural facilities and reposition her socio-economic status and enhance environmental sustainability.

He said that a total of 14,505 enforcement notices were served on distressed structures and illegal and non-conforming structures through the combined efforts of the ministry and its agencies.

“In the same vein, the Ministry and its agencies identified 8,428 on-going building construction, 543 distressed building and served 2,360 existing building construction with Post Construction Audit (PCA) requests.

“Within the period under review, we issued 13 certificates of completeness and fitness for habitation and unsealed 629 property due to enforcement and compliance.

“In the bid to guarantee the stability and integrity of structures and prevent building collapse in the state, the Ministry through the Materials Testing Laboratory, carried out 54 Geo-technic tests, 41 water tests, 2,302 concrete tests, 1,391 steel test, 25 stanchions test and 75 per cent points of pile.

We Identified 182 Buildings for re-engineering and served 80 private schools, 100 commercial buildings, 28 bank head offices and the 20 Local Governments and 37 Local Council Development areas notices for stability and integrity tests,” he said.

Edited By: Emmanuel Okara/Wale Ojetimi (NAN)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also