Connect with us

Health

Antimicrobial Resistance: UN urges action to avert disaster

Published

on

Antimicrobial Resistance: UN urges action to avert disaster

Drugs

There is immediate need for  coordinated  action to avert a potentially disastrous drug-resistance crisis in a generation, says the UN Ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (IACG).

According to IACG, drug-resistant diseases can cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050 and damage to the economy as catastrophic as the 2008-2009 global financial crisis.

Also, by 2030, antimicrobial resistance could force up to 24 million people into extreme poverty,’’ the group said in a report released on Monday.

The report: “No Time to Wait: Securing the Future From Drug-Resistant Infections’’, a report to the Secretary General of the United Nations April 2019, said presently, at least 700,000 people die each year due to drug-resistant diseases.

This also includes 230,000 people who die from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis presently.

“More and more common diseases, including respiratory tract infections, sexually transmitted infections and urinary tract infections, are untreatable; lifesaving medical procedures are becoming much riskier, and our food systems are increasingly hazardous.

“Antimicrobial resistance is a global crisis that threatens a century of progress in health and achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

“Antimicrobial (including antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal and antiprotozoal) agents are critical tools for fighting diseases in humans, terrestrial and aquatic animals and plants, but they are becoming ineffective.

“Alarming levels of resistance have been reported in countries of all income levels, with the result that common diseases are becoming untreatable, and lifesaving medical procedures riskier to perform.

“Antimicrobial resistance poses a formidable challenge to achieving Universal Health Coverage and threatens progress against many of the Sustainable Development Goals, this includes health, food security, clean water and sanitation, responsible consumption and production, and poverty and inequality.’’

On some of the causes of antimicrobial resistance, report said they include misuse and overuse of existing antimicrobials in humans, animals and plants are accelerating the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

“Also, inadequate access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene in healthcare facilities, farms, schools, households and community settings; poor infection and disease prevention; lack of equitable access to affordable and quality-assured antimicrobials, vaccines and diagnostics.

“Weak health, food and feed production, food safety and waste management systems are increasing the burden of infectious disease in animals and humans and contributing to the emergence and spread of drug-resistant pathogens.’’

Highlighting some of the effects of the challenge, the report said that drug-resistant diseases related deaths including deaths from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, could increase to 10 million deaths globally per year by 2050.

“Under the most alarming scenario, if no action is taken, around 2.4 million people could die in high-income countries between 2015 and 2050 without a sustained effort to contain antimicrobial resistance.

“ The economic damage of uncontrolled antimicrobial resistance could be comparable to the shocks experienced during the 2008-2009 global financial crisis as a result of dramatically increased health care expenditures; impact on food and feed production, trade and livelihoods; and increased poverty and inequality.’’

Recognising that human, animal, food and environmental health are closely interconnected, the report called for a coordinated, multisectoral “One Health” approach.

The report recommends countries to prioritise national action plans to scale-up financing and capacity-building efforts.

“Put in place stronger regulatory systems and support awareness programs for responsible and prudent use of antimicrobials by professionals in human, animal and plant health.’’

It also urged countries to invest in ambitious research and development for new technologies to combat antimicrobial resistance and urgently phase out the use of critically important antimicrobials as growth promoters in agriculture.

Reacting to the report in a statement, Ms Amina Mohammed, UN Deputy Secretary-General and Co-Chair of the IACG, said: “Antimicrobial resistance is one of the greatest threats we face as a global community.

“This report reflects the depth and scope of the response needed to curb its rise and protect a century of progress in health.

“It rightly emphasises that there is no time to wait and I urge all stakeholders to act on its recommendations and work urgently to protect our people and planet and secure a sustainable future for all,’’ she said.

Foreign

WHO warns of disturbing rates of antimicrobial resistance during COVID-19 pandemic

Published

on

By

The World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus on Monday warned that the world is “losing its ability” to use critically important antimicrobial medicines.

Speaking at a virtual press conference on Monday, the WHO chief said that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increased use of antibiotics, which ultimately will lead to higher bacterial resistance rates.

Calling the threat of antimicrobial resistance “one of the most urgent challenges of our time,” Tedros urged the world to find new models to incentivize sustainable innovation in this regard.

“On the supply side, there is essentially very little market incentive to developing new antibiotics and antimicrobial agents, which has led to multiple market failures of very promising tools in the past few years,” he said.

A press release issued on Monday also showed that high rates of resistance among antimicrobials frequently used to treat common infections, such as urinary tract infections or some forms of diarrhea, indicate that the world is running out of effective ways to tackle these diseases.

“For instance, the rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin, an antimicrobial frequently used to treat urinary tract infections, varied from 8.4 percent to 92.9 percent in 33 reporting countries,” the press release noted.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Health

‘Ignore antimicrobial resistance at your own peril’ – India High Commissioner

Published

on

By

Mr Ngulkham Gangte, the Indian High Commissioner to Zambia has warned that any country that ignores the effects of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) does so at its own peril.

AMR is the ability of a microorganism (like bacteria, viruses and some parasites) to stop an antimicrobial (such as antibiotics, antivirals and antimalarial) from working against it.

Gangte gave the warning at a three-day Pan-Africa Workshop on Effective Implementation of National Action Plans on AMR, holding in Zambia.

The workshop, which has in attendance experts from 11 countries, is organised by the Zambia National Public Health Institute, Ministry of Health, Zambia.

It was organised in conjunction with the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), the India-based think tank.

Journalists from five African countries, who shared their experiences from the ground and got to know what is being done to contain this crisis of AMR are also attending the workshop.

According to Gangte, the ability of organisms to resist antimicrobial treatment, especially antibiotics has direct impact on human and animal health.
“This carries a heavy economic burden due to high cost of treatment and reduced productivity caused by prolonged sickness.

“AMR also impact food safety, nutrition security, livelihoods and consequently, attainment of several Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

“Therefore, we all must work together to prevent the menace of AMR in our countries,’’ Gangte advised.

Dr Chitalu Chilufya, the Zambia Minister of Health, also called on African countries to urgently act on the development and implementation of National Action Plans (NAPs) for AMR.

Chilufya said the objective of the workshop is to discuss the threat of AMR to humans, animals and the environment, its spread and impact in Africa as well as to understand the implementation of the NAPs on AMR.

“AMR is the consequence of the abuse and misuse of antibiotics, which poses greater threat to public health security that robs countries of their aspirations for universal health coverage.

“There is the need for African countries to invest in resilient public health systems, which will gear towards reducing the inappropriate use of antibiotics among the public, ’’ Chilufya said.

He, therefore, called on the media to partner with their respective governments in educating the public on the need to stop the abuse and misuse of antibiotics.

Also, Mr Amit Khurana, Director, Food Safety and Toxins Programme, CSE, India, set the context for the workshop.

He called for innovative ways to manage the issue of access and excess of antibiotics usage.

Khurana said that the misuse and overuse of antibiotics in food-animal production is a key driver of AMR in humans who ultimately consume the animals and animal products.

“The global success to contain AMR will hugely depend on how we handle it, so we must use greater discretion in our approaches and implementations.

“The threat of AMR is real and globally reaching crisis levels.

“Therefore, there must be caution in the production of food and management of waste.

“We cannot afford to allow misuse of antibiotics and chemicals first in our system and then after spend a lot to clean it up from their food and environment,’’ Khurana said.

The News Agency of Nigeria reports that part of the highlights of the workshop was the launch of five key reports including the “Down To Earth’s (DTE) From Cure to Killers”.

Also launched is the road map to phase out non-therapeutic antibiotic use and critically important antibiotics in food-animals and baseline information for integrated AMR surveillance in Zambia.

The Zambia’s Multi-Sectoral National Action Plan on AMR and Zambia’s integrated AMR Surveillance Framework was another report that was launched.

Continue Reading

Foreign

Ignore antimicrobial resistance at your own peril – India High Commissioner

Published

on

Mr Ngulkham Gangte, the Indian High Commissioner to Zambia has warned that any country that ignores the effects of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) does so at its own peril.

AMR is the ability of a microorganism (like bacteria, viruses and some parasites) to stop an antimicrobial (such as antibiotics, antivirals and antimalarial) from working against it.

Gangte gave the warning at a three-day Pan-Africa Workshop on Effective Implementation of National Action Plans on AMR, holding in Zambia.

The workshop, which has in attendance experts from 11 countries, is organised by the Zambia National Public Health Institute, Ministry of Health, Zambia.

It was organised in conjunction with the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), the India-based think tank.

Journalists from five African countries, who shared their experiences from the ground and got to know what is being done to contain this crisis of AMR are also attending the workshop.

According to Gangte, the ability of organisms to resist antimicrobial treatment, especially antibiotics has direct impact on human and animal health.

“This carries a heavy economic burden due to high cost of treatment and reduced productivity caused by prolonged sickness.

“AMR also impact food safety, nutrition security, livelihoods and consequently, attainment of several Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

“Therefore, we all must work together to prevent the menace of AMR in our countries,’’ Gangte advised.

Dr Chitalu Chilufya, the Zambia Minister of Health, also called on African countries to urgently act on the development and implementation of National Action Plans (NAPs) for AMR.

Chilufya said the objective of the workshop is to discuss the threat of AMR to humans, animals and the environment, its spread and impact in Africa as well as to understand the implementation of the NAPs on AMR.

“AMR is the consequence of the abuse and misuse of antibiotics, which poses greater threat to public health security that robs countries of their aspirations for universal health coverage.

“There is the need for African countries to invest in resilient public health systems, which will gear towards reducing the inappropriate use of antibiotics among the public, ’’ Chilufya said.

He, therefore, called on the media to partner with their respective governments in educating the public on the need to stop the abuse and misuse of antibiotics.

Also, Mr Amit Khurana, Director, Food Safety and Toxins Programme, CSE, India, set the context for the workshop.

He called for innovative ways to manage the issue of access and excess of antibiotics usage.

Khurana said that the misuse and overuse of antibiotics in food-animal production is a key driver of AMR in humans who ultimately consume the animals and animal products.

“The global success to contain AMR will hugely depend on how we handle it, so we must use greater discretion in our approaches and implementations.

“The threat of AMR is real and globally reaching crisis levels.

“Therefore, there must be caution in the production of food and management of waste.

“We cannot afford to allow misuse of antibiotics and chemicals first in our system and then after spend a lot to clean it up from their food and environment,’’ Khurana said.

The Nigeria News Agency reports that part of the highlights of the workshop was the launch of five key reports including the “Down To Earth’s (DTE) From Cure to Killers”.

Also launched is the road map to phase out non-therapeutic antibiotic use and critically important antibiotics in food-animals and baseline information for integrated AMR surveillance in Zambia.

The Zambia’s Multi-Sectoral National Action Plan on AMR and Zambia’s integrated AMR Surveillance Framework was another report that was launched.

Edited By: Vivian Ihechu/Abdulfatah Babatunde

Continue Reading

Health

Antimicrobial resistance, challenge in Nigeria health sector- CFID

Published

on

Mr Danjuma Adda, the Chief Executive Officer of the Centre for Initiative and Development (CFID)-Taraba, on Wednesday said antimicrobial resistance was increasingly becoming a major challenge in the Nigerian health sector.

Adda disclosed this at a two- day workshop for health workers on antimicrobial stewardship organised by CFID – Taraba in collaboration with Nigeria Centre for Disease Control in Jalingo.

According to him, the workshop with the theme, Enhancing Knowledge on antimicrobial use and practice among health care professionals, targets 600 health workers in Taraba and Adamawa states.

Adda explained that 40 health workers including medical doctors, nurses, lab technicians among others were selected for the training in Taraba.

He noted that the trainees were expected to go back to their stations and step down the training to other health workers to meet up the 400 target for Taraba and the same thing would be done to achieve the 200 target for Adamawa.

“Antimicrobial resistance has become a major challenge in the health sector that needed urgent attention from all stakeholders.

“The aim of the training is to equip the health workers with the World Health Organization (WHO)’s multi-disciplinary approaches in order to tackle drug resistance in common illnesses,” he said. Adda said the trainees for Taraba were selected from various health facilities across Jalingo, Zing, Ardo-Kola and Lau Local Government Councils.

Dr Ebenezer Spake, the Director Public Health with the Taraba Ministry of Health pledged the support of the state government to the success of the campaign against drug resistance in the state.

Apake advised Taraba residents to shun self medication and patronage of unlicensed drug dealers in order to reduce the ugly incidents of drug resistance in common illnesses.    

Edited by: Saidu Adamu/Ekemini Ladejobi

Continue Reading

Agriculture

Association raises alert on antimicrobial resistance to public health, livestock

Published

on

Antibiotic

Abuja, Nov. 19, 2019 The Nigerian Veterinary Medical Association(NVMA), on Tuesday, joined the global effort to raise awareness on antimicrobial resistance to public health and livestock.

The NVMA made the call in a statement on Tuesday to mark the World Antibiotic Awareness Week, signed by its publicity secretary, Dr Gloria Daminabo.

The association stressed that though antimicrobial are useful in disease treatment, their misuse leads to failure as microbes develop resistance to these life-saving treatments.

It said these resistant microbes are also transferred to other animals and humans as well.

“Antimicrobial resistance in livestock industry is a threat to public health, livestock productivity, food security and the economy, especially in developing nations such as Nigeria,’’ the association said.

The NVMA said the Nigerian situation arose as a result of poor production practices, poor hygiene, weak policies, under regulation of antimicrobial use in animals and inadequate veterinary and other related manpower.

The statement said that with antimicrobial resistance come attendant losses from increased cost of research in producing more effective antibiotics, when the available ones stop working.

Other losses noted by the NVMA as a result of antimicrobial resistance include;   increased cost of livestock production, as more funds go into treatment and losses from deaths of livestock and people.

It also said the country shall be unable to neither participate, nor benefit fully from international trade in animal products in spite of enormous livestock resources.

On this note, the association also called on stakeholders in the livestock production sector to imbibe good production practices, and seek advice from professionals with the use of antimicrobial.

It urged all regulatory agencies and professionals to be proactive and alert to their responsibilities, and work in synergy to reduce antibiotic misuse in the overall interest of the country.

The association pledged to continue its advocacy and professional role, and  in collaboration with all relevant stake-holders and the public, to curb the spread of antimicrobial resistance to the benefit of humanity.

edited by Sadiya Hamza

Continue Reading

Foreign

FAO pledges support for prudent use of antimicrobials in Africa

Published

on

The Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) on Monday pledged support to enhance the prudent use of antimicrobials in Africa’s farming systems.

Scott Newman, Senior Animal Health and Livestock Production Officer at FAO Regional Office for Africa, said the support will help reduce antimicrobial resistance in agricultural systems and the environment.

“The misuse of these drugs, associated with the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant micro-organisms, places everyone at great risk and poses a threat to public health, sustainable food production and potentially to biodiversity and ecological systems,’’ Newman said.

He said that the sheer magnitude and complexity of the antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial pollution calls for a coordinated and integrated approach to eradicating the challenge.

Newman urged a multi-sectoral approach inclusive of the public and animal health sectors, the agricultural production sectors, environment and ecosystem sectors to contain antimicrobial resistance.

He noted that antibiotics in the environment can affect the overall composition and diversity of the microbial community crucial for the performance of important ecological functions such as nutrient cycling, decomposition and primary productivity in both aquatic and terrestrial environments.

Antibiotics present in the environment at low concentrations can accumulate in human populations through long-term exposure to drinking water, food or consumer goods with unknown health consequences, according to Newman.

He said that antimicrobials play a critical role in the treatment of diseases of humans, farm animals (aquatic and terrestrial) and plants.

“We are supporting responsible use of antimicrobials because their use is essential to food security, human well-being and to animal welfare.’’

He urged African countries to improve awareness on antimicrobials, develop the capacity for surveillance and monitoring, strengthen governance and promote good practices in food and agricultural systems, including the prudent use of antimicrobials.

Due to the dangers posed by antimicrobials, FAO, World Health Organisation and the United Nations Environment Programme developed the tripartite work plan on antimicrobials targeting 10 countries including Kenya, Burkina Faso, Senegal and Zimbabwe in support of the Global Action Plan on antimicrobials. (Xinhua/NAN)

AIB

Edited by Abdulfatah Babatunde

Continue Reading

Agriculture

New UN report calls for urgent action to avert antimicrobial resistance crisis.

Published

on

Diseases

Abuja, April 29, 2019 (NAN) United Nation Ad Hoc Interagency Coordinating Group (IACG) on Antimicrobial Resistance has warned that drug-resistant diseases can cause 10 million deaths each year globally by 2050, if urgent action is taken.

The UN, international agencies and experts on Monday released a groundbreaking report demanding immediate, coordinated and ambitious action to avert a potentially disastrous drug-resistance crisis.

The report was made available to the News Agency if Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja on Monday.

It noted that the report reflected a renewed commitment to collaborative action at the global level by the World Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the UN, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Health Organisation.

UN ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group on Antimicrobial Resistance, which released the report, warned that “if no action is taken’’ drug-resistant diseases could cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050 and damage to the economy as catastrophic as the 2008 to 2009 global financial crisis.

It said that by 2030, antimicrobial resistance could force up to 24 million people into extreme poverty.

“Currently, at least 700,000 people die each year due to drug-resistant diseases, including 230,000 people who die from multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis.

“More and more common diseases, including respiratory tract infections, sexually transmitted infections and urinary tract infections, are untreatable; lifesaving medical procedures are becoming much riskier, and our food systems are increasingly precarious.

“The world is already feeling the economic and health consequences as crucial medicines become ineffective.

“Without investment from countries in all income brackets, future generations will face the disastrous impacts of uncontrolled antimicrobial resistance,’’ it said.

Recognising that human, animal, food and environmental health are closely interconnected, the report called for a coordinated, multi-sectoral “One Health” approach.

The agencies called for immediate coordinated action to avert a global potentially disastrous drug-resistance crisis and prevent staggering number of deaths each year.

José da Silva, Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said the report’s recommendations recognised that antimicrobials were critical to safeguard food production, safety and trade, human as well as animal health, “and it clearly promotes responsible use across sectors”.

He said that all countries could foster sustainable food systems and farming practices that reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance by working together to promote viable alternatives to antimicrobial use as laid out in the report’s recommendations.

Amina Mohammed UN Deputy Secretary-General and Co-Chair of the IACG, described antimicrobial resistance as one of the greatest threats facing the global community.

She said that the report reflected the depth and scope of the response needed to curb its rise and protect a century of progress in health.

“It rightly emphasises that there is no time to wait and I urge all stakeholders to act on its recommendations and work urgently to protect our people and planet and secure a sustainable future for all.’’

Mohammed urged that the recommendations required immediate engagement across sectors from governments and the private sector to civil society and academia.

Monique Eloit, Director-General of World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), said that antimicrobial resistance must be addressed urgently through a “One Health” approach involving bold, long-term commitments from governments and other stakeholders, supported by the international organisations.

She said that the report had demonstrated the level of commitment and coordination that would be required as “we face this global challenge to public health, animal health and welfare, and food security.’’

“We must all play our part in ensuring future access to and efficacy of these essential medicines.

Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organisation and Co-Chair of the IACG, said the report had made concrete recommendations that could save thousands of lives every year.

He said that the global communities were at a critical point in the fight to protect some of our most essential medicines.

Ghebreyesus said the report highlighted the need for coordinated and intensive efforts to overcome antimicrobial resistance, a major barrier to the achievement of many of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Convened at the request of world leaders after the first ever UN High-Level Meeting on Antimicrobial Resistance in 2016, the expert group brought together partners across the UN, international organisations and individuals with expertise across human, animal and plant health.

Others are from the food, animal feed, trade, development and environment sectors, to formulate a blueprint for the fight against antimicrobial resistance. (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Antimicrobial ingredient in toothpastes may have adverse colonic effects: study

Published

on

American and Chinese scientists have found that an antimicrobial ingredient commonly used in hand soaps and toothpastes could have adverse effects on colonic inflammation and colon cancer by altering gut microbiota, the microbes found in people’s intestines.

A study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine revealed that short-time treatment with low-dose triclosan led to low-grade colonic inflammation, and exaggerated disease development of colitis and colitis-associated colon cancer in mice.

“These results, for the first time, suggest that triclosan could have adverse effects on gut health,” said Zhang Guodong, assistant professor of food science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the paper’s senior author.

Zhang told Xinhua, “The toothpaste we use can enter into the intestinal tract, then impacting the gut microbiota.”

Triclosan is among the most widely used antimicrobial ingredients and is found in more than 2,000 consumer products and a National Health and Nutrition Examination survey showed that triclosan was detected in about 75 per cent of the urine samples of individuals tested in the U. S. and it is among the top ten pollutants found in U.S. rivers.

“Because this compound is so widely used, our study suggests that there is an urgent need to further evaluate the impact of triclosan exposure on gut health in preparation for the potential establishment of further regulatory policies,” said Yang Caixia, a postdoctoral fellow in Zhang’s laboratory and the paper’s first author.

Zhang’s team and Chinese researchers including those from Xi’an Jiaotong University investigated the effects of triclosan on colonic inflammation and colon cancer using several mouse models.

They reported that in all mouse models tested, triclosan promoted colonic inflammation and colon tumorigenesis.

The research team found that gut microbiota was critical for the observed adverse effects of triclosan, since feeding triclosan to mice reduced the diversity and changed the composition of the gut microbiome.

However, triclosan had no effect in a germ-free mouse model where there is no gut microbiome present, nor in a genetically engineered mouse model where there is no Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an important mediator for host-microbiota communications.

“This is strong evidence that gut microbiota is required for the biological effects of triclosan,” Zhang said.

This study observed that triclosan altered mouse gut microbiota, increased inflammation, increased the severity of colitis symptoms and spurred colitis-associated colon cancer cell growth.

SH

Continue Reading

Foreign

WHO launches new Global Antimicrobial Surveillance System

Published

on

WHO launched a new Global Antimicrobial Surveillance System (GLASS), a global effort to address drug resistance.

The GLASS, will involve the development of tools and standards and improved collaboration around the world to track drug resistance, measure its health and economic impacts, and design targeted solutions.

WHO reported new surveillance data on Monday which reveals widespread resistance to some of the world’s most common infections, including E. coli and pneumonia.

The agency said Antimicrobials have been a driver of unprecedented medical and societal advances, but their overuse has resulted in antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Dr Marc Sprenger, Director of WHO’s Antimicrobial Resistance Secretariat, said at the launch of the agency’s GLASS: “the report confirms the serious situation of antibiotic resistance worldwide,”

He said the most commonly reported resistant bacteria were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Salmonella spp.

According to him, while the system did not include data on the resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis, WHO has been tracking and providing annual updates on it since 1994, in the Global tuberculosis report.

Sprenger said among patients with suspected bloodstream infection, the proportion that had bacteria resistant to at least one of the most commonly used antibiotics ranged widely – from zero to 82 per cent – between different countries.

He said resistance to penicillin, which had been used for decades to treat pneumonia, ranged from zero to 51 per cent among reporting countries.

Sprenger added that between eight to 65 per cent of E. coli associated with urinary tract infections presented resistance to the antibiotic commonly used to treat it, ciprofloxacin.

“Some of the world’s most common – and potentially most dangerous – infections are proving drug-resistant. And most worrying of all, pathogens don’t respect national borders,” he added.

To date, 25 high-income, 20 middle-income and seven low-income countries are enrolled in WHO’s Global Antimicrobial Surveillance System.

For the first report, 40 countries provided information on national surveillance systems with 22 also providing data on antibiotic resistance levels.

He said the quality and completeness of data in this first GLASS report vary widely.

Some countries face major challenges in building their national surveillance systems, including a lack of personnel, funds and infrastructure.

Dr Carmem Pessoa-Silva, WHO Surveillance System Coordinator said the report was a vital first step towards improving our understanding of the extent of antimicrobial resistance.

“Surveillance is in its infancy, but it is vital to develop it if we are to anticipate and tackle one of the biggest threats to global public health

“WHO is supporting countries in setting up national antimicrobial resistance surveillance systems to produce reliable, meaningful data, with GLASS helping to standardise data collection for a more complete picture of patterns and trends.”

Solid drug resistance surveillance programmes in tuberculosis, HIV and malaria have been functioning for years – estimating disease burden, planning diagnostic and treatment services, monitoring control interventions effectiveness and designing effective treatment regimens to address and prevent future resistance.

“GLASS is expected to perform a similar function for common bacterial pathogens,” he said.

Edited by: Sadiya Hamza
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also