Connect with us

Economy

Civil servants decry arbitrary deductions from their salaries by IPPIS

Published

on

Some federal civil servants in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), have decried the continued arbitrary deductions from their salaries by the Integrated Payroll and Personnel Information System (IPPIS) for no reason.

They expressed their grievances over the irregularities in salary payment in separate interviews with Nigeria News Agency in Abuja on Tuesday, describing it as fraud.

Some said the deductions were alien to them as they were not aware of any reasons why their salaries should be deducted.

Mr Livinus Ugochukwu, a former employee of NAN said that in August 2018, IPPIS deducted N10,158.33 from his salary and credited Full Range Micro-Finance company, an organisation he did not know.

Ugochukwu said IPPIS also deducted N8,784 from his salary in May and credited Brain Integrated System, another organisation he did not know.

Another public sector worker, Mrs Hadiza Aliyu, said she received a text message from CreditWallet, a micro-credit company, telling her that she had been pre-qualified for N500,000 loan.

On enquiry about how the loan would be re-paid, a desk officer with the company said the group was working with IPPIS.

Similarly, Mr Monday Ogbuoka, a civil servant with the Ministry of Information complained that he noticed the irregularities in his salary for three consecutive times.

Ogbuoka said that N20,000 was deducted from his salary by IPPIS without any explanation.

He said that he decided to investigate why the deduction was made and discovered that an official of IPPIS had connived with a business company to make the deduction even when he did not buy anything from the company.

Another civil servant, Mrs Ann John, a level 15 officer told NAN that N50, 000 was deducted from her salary by IPPIS for three consecutive months for no reason.

“I was surprised when I collected my pay slip I discovered that N50,000 was deducted from my salary by IPPIS.

“When I requested for explanation from Salaries and Wages in my office, I was told that the office did not authorise such deductions,’’ John said.

Mr Abdullahi Musa, a level 12 civil servant said he did not buy any goods from any vendor yet a certain amount was being deducted from his salary monthly.

“I went to IPPIS desk office in my office and they could not give any reason for the deductions, the office was not even aware of such deductions,’’ Musa said.

Ms. Chikara Chineke, a level 10 officer said that she had also experienced a monthly deduction of N10,000 for a period of six months.

“I don’t understand why deductions were made from my salary for six consecutive months without explanation. It is not funny. I have complained and nothing has been done.

“At least, there should be some explanation to that. I never collected anything on credit that I should suffer this. Something has to be done to stop the deductions,’’ Chineke lamented.

Investigations by NAN reveal that data of subscribers have been compromised by organisations and individuals they had been entrusted with.

Oftentimes, Nigerians are inundated with messages on their cell phones and e-mails asking them to subscribe to goods and services.

The recipients, especially public service workers, are encouraged to apply for loans from micro-credit outfits on very liberal conditions, including not providing securities for the facilities.

Repayments for such loans which can be obtained within 24 hours, are cheap with interests on single digit.

Others request prospective subscribers to buy household goods on credit and the repayment plan spread overtime.

Prospective subscribers are asked not to worry about the mode of repayment since the vendors can access their payroll information from their employers.

This has often been the case with Federal Government employees enrolled on IPPIS.

While the promoters of the services claim they work with IPPIS, the agency under the Office of Accountant-General of the Federation, denies knowledge of the transactions. Meanwhile, the workers on the receiving end have continued to groan.

However, NAN sought to get the comments of the Director, IPPIS, Mr Olufehinti Olusegun on the allegations but several phone calls and text messages put across to his cell phone were not answered.

Edited By: Ese E. Ekama
(NAN)

 

Foreign

Roadside bomb kills 3 civilians, wounds 4 in Afghanistan’s Sari Pul province

Published

on

By

Three civilians were killed and four others injured as a roadside bomb struck a car in the northern Sari Pul province on Tuesday, police spokesman in the province Noor Agha Faizy said.

According to the official, a mine planted by the armed insurgents on a road in Shiramha area outside provincial capital, the Sari Pul city struck a car, killing three civilians and injuring four others including three women.

Without providing more details, the official blamed the enemies of peace, a reference to the Taliban militants for organizing the roadside bombing, but armed outfit, which is active in parts of Sari Pul province has yet to claim responsibility.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

United States Los Angeles County extends curfew amid civil unrest

Published

on

By

A countywide curfew will be in effect Monday for a second night in Los Angeles County after another day of protests over the death of African American man George Floyd in police custody last week in Minneapolis, authorities said.

County officials announced that the curfew for the most populous county in the United States with a population of over 10 million will run from 6 p.m. Monday to 6 a.m. Tuesday local time (0100 to 1300 GMT Tuesday).

Kathryn Barger, chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, tweeted that the extension of the countywide curfew is “to protect against any further devastation.”

With COVID-19 fresh in our minds, we see that staying home can save lives. Life is precious — and we must do everything we can to protect one another,” she added.

During the curfew, all residents are required to stay off “public streets, avenues, boulevards, places, walkways, alleys, parks or any public areas or unimproved private realty within

Any” href=”# Los Angeles County.”

Any”> Los Angeles County.”

Any

violation of the order is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine not to exceed 1,000 U.S. dollars or an imprisonment up to six months, or both, according to the terms of the curfew.

The announcement came after the protests over Floyd’s death went into the sixth straight day on Monday in the Los Angeles area.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti also extended a curfew for the City of Los Angeles on Monday. Some other cities in the county, such as Beverly Hills, Santa Monica and Long Beach, even issued their own stricter curfew orders in response to days of chaotic protests.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

At least 15 civilians killed by gunmen in Burkina Faso

Published

on

By

At least 15 merchants were killed in an ambush by gunmen on Friday in Burkina Faso‘s northern Loroum province, according to a governmental statement that reaches Xinhua on Saturday.

The attack targeted a convoy of merchants from Titao on their way to Solle in the Loroum province, according to the statement.

The initial review shows 15 killed, a number of injured and missing as well as significant material loss, it said.

Burkina Faso‘s government lamented cowardly terrorist attack on civilians, especially on women and children, and started a combing operation by armed forces after the tragedy.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

UN condemns killing of 8 Somali civilians

Published

on

By

The UN humanitarian agency on Friday condemned the killing of seven health personnel and a civilian in Gololey village in Somalia’s Middle Shabelle region by unknown gunmen.

Adam Abdelmoula, resident and humanitarian coordinator for Somalia, expressed shock at the killing.

The eight Somali civilians were abducted on Wednesday from an non-governmental organization-run health clinic before their brutal killing, he said.

“Preliminary information indicates that they suffered brutal deaths,” Abdelmoula said in a statement issued in Mogadishu.

The UN humanitarian official extended his deepest condolences to the families of the victims.

Attacks against medical facilities and personnel are unacceptable and a breach of international humanitarian law and any common decency, he said.

“It is unbelievable that this attack comes at a time when Somalia is grappling to contain a triple threat of a pandemic, flooding and the resurgence of desert locusts,” Abdelmoula said.

No arrest has been made in connection to the killings.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

UN agencies concerned about use of explosive devices against Libyan civilians

Published

on

By

The United Nations Children‘s Fund (UNICEF), the Libyan Mine Action Center (LibMac) and the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) on Thursday expressed concern over the use of improvised explosive devices against civilians in south of the Libyan capital Tripoli.

The United Nations Children‘s Fund (UNICEF), the Libyan Mine Action Centre (LibMac) and the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) are deeply concerned about reports that residents of the Ain Zara and Salahuddin areas of Tripoli have been exposed, killed and wounded by Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) placed in and near their homes,” a joint statement said.

The statement explained that children and adolescents are particularly exposed and at risk of explosive ordnance, stressing that those who survived a blast are likely to experience serious physical, psychological and social problems and may have their life chances affected by the consequences of the incidents.

UNICEF Special Representative in Libya Abdel-Rahman Ghandour stressed that all parties to the conflict must abide by their obligations under international humanitarian law and international human rights law, as well as the Convention on the Rights of the Child to protect children at all times.

The eastern-based army has been leading a military campaign for more than a year, trying to take control of Tripoli and topple the UN-backed government. The fighting has killed and injured hundreds of civilians and displaced more than 150,000 others.

The UN-backed government’s forces accused the eastern-based army of planting mines before withdrawing from conflict areas in southern Tripoli.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Commentary: China’s Civil Code a landmark law to protect people’s rights

Published

on

By

China‘s newly adopted Civil Code has once again demonstrated the country’s strive for bettering people’s life by rule of law.

As the first law defined as a “code” in the People’s Republic of China, the Civil Code is a tangible legislation that offers concrete and effective responses to people’s growing demands for a better life — security, equality, dignity, and many others.

In addition to general and supplementary provisions, the Civil Code includes six parts on real rights, contracts, personality rights, marriage and family, inheritance, and tort liabilities.

Targeting the actual lives of the people, the Civil Code addresses modern fields that need regulation, including new problems emerging from urbanization, environment protection, the application of AI technologies and the development of the digital economy.

Further evidence of the Civil Code answering the people’s call is its timely response to shortcomings identified during epidemic prevention and control. It offers support to comprehensively improving the effectiveness of law-based epidemic response and governance.

The drafting of the Civil Code also embodies a people-centered philosophy. While preparing the draft, the legislature sought public opinions on 10 occasions, receiving over 1 million online comments and suggestions.

The overwhelming approval of the Civil Code on Thursday at the annual session of the National People‘s Congress, China‘s top legislature, has demonstrated the wide public support for the law.

Using the Civil Code to protect 1.4 billion people’s rights in every aspect of life will help modernize China‘s governance system and capacity, as the country is completing building of a moderately prosperous society in all respects.

The legislation also contributes to the global drive to protect people’s rights, as the Civil Code provides a legislative reference on how to promote fairness, justice, dignity and each and every person’s rights to pursue happiness.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

General news

Labour, Civil Society flays deduction of salaries of workers, pensioners by Kaduna Govt, other States

Published

on

The Labour Civil Society Situation Room on COVID-19 has criticised the arbitrary deduction in the salaries and pension of workers and pensioners by the Kaduna State Government and other States.

Mr Ayuba Wabba, the President, Nigeria Labour Congress (NLC) and Chairman of the Labour Civil Society Situation Room, said this in a communiqué issued at the end of a meeting on Thursday in Abuja.

The meeting was held to review the recent developments pertaining to the management of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly on the economic front.

Wabba said that the Labour Civil Society Situation Room reviewed the decision by the Kaduna state government and a few other states to deduct the salaries of workers in their states, including healthcare workers battling the COVID-19 challenge.

“Even worse is the threat by Gov. Nasir El-Rufai to sack affected workers if they go on strike.

”This anti-worker practice championed by the Kaduna State government violates the fundamental principles and rights at work.

“These principles and rights are key components of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) global labour standards and are also codified in our laws.

”The infringement of these rights is a crude abuse of power and akin to modern day slavery.

“Wages are binding contracts which cannot be unilaterally or arbitrarily reviewed. It is unfortunate that while some states are giving incentives to workers at this time of grave health emergency, in line with global trend.

The Kaduna State Government is taking away from workers and pensioners. This is nothing but a full-blown industrial tyranny,” he said.

Wabba said the situation room was behind the ultimatum by workers in the affected states for a reversal of the unjust decision, adding it fully stands by workers’ resolve to embark on strike, if their demands were not met.

He said the Labour Civil Society Situation Room demanded that the state governments must reciprocate Federal Government’s gesture in granting moratorium on repayment of budget support palliatives by paying workers and pensioners their full entitlements.

“We also renew our calls for investigation on how states used the palliatives and Paris Club refunds.

“We demand that private sector employers should stop the retrenchment of workers in the guise of COVID-19 as such moves would only impair efforts geared at economic revitalisation,” he said.

Wabba said that the Labour Civil Society Situation Room applauded the Federal Government for reversing the directive by the Federal Airports Authority of Nigeria (FAAN) to place workers on half salaries based on the claims of shortfall in revenue owing to COVID-19.

“This is the way to go for all employers in the public and private sectors in order to protect the livelihood and dignity of workers.

“The continued incidence of job losses, income deprivation and denial of the means of livelihood for workers by some employers in Nigeria on the excuse of COVID-19 is a source of worry to us,” he said.

The NLC president therefore said that Labour Civil Society Situation Room recommended that for immediate term, governments should adopt a measured approach to the fallout of COVID-19.

Wabba said government should not cut down on budgetary allocations to education, health, agriculture and infrastructure as these sectors were critical for the needed economic rebound and growth.

He also said government should unfreeze the embargo on public sector jobs, adding that hike in user access charges on public utilities should be shelved for the next six months.

“Given the abuse of security votes by many political office holders. we call for the scrapping of security votes from public budgeting in Nigeria.

“We call on political office holders to reduce their salaries and allowances in order to free up finances for other areas of national developmental needs.

“We also call for an end to medical and education tourism for elected public officials and their families.

“We call for an immediate stop to the practice of borrowing to finance consumption.

“We call for foreign loans where necessary to be tied exclusively to capital projects with feasible income and debt repayment potentials cum projections,” he said.

Wabba also called for accelerated disbursement of palliatives and loans to workers in the informal sector.

He said that this should be transparent, inclusive and monitored by mass-based groups, adding that the conditions for access to the loans should be minimal to deepen access.

Wabba said the Labour Civil Society Situation Room also recommended that the budgetary and planning process in Nigeria should be overhauled to become more socially inclusive, citizens-centred, value objective and reflective of real national developmental needs.

“We call on the National Assembly to set in motion legislative processes to deliver the promises of Chapter Two of Nigeria’s Constitution.

“On the budget process, we must cut our cloth according to our materials. We must discard the use of assumptive and deficit budgets that cannot be funded by available resources and heavily dependent on local and foreign loans especially for recurrent expenditure.

“We call for the resuscitation of Ajaokuta Iron and Steel Complex, proper governance for our solid minerals sector, revival of moribund textile factories and other manufacturing concerns as a demonstration of our commitment to economic diversification,” he said.

Wabba said the Labour Civil Society Situation Room reiterates its commitment to defend jobs, wages and livelihoods.

He added that all interventions in this crisis must be geared at enhancing productivity, stimulating economic growth, promoting diversification of the economy and mobilising and empowering national productive forces.

Edited By: Chidinma Agu/Muhammad Suleiman Tola (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

China Focus: China adopts milestone Civil Code

Published

on

By

China‘s top legislature Thursday voted to adopt the country’s long-expected Civil Code, a milestone legislation that will better protect people’s rights and offer strong legal support for the country’s development.

The Civil Code passed at the third session of the 13th National People‘s Congress (NPC) will take effect on Jan. 1, 2021.

The compilation of the Civil Code is an important component of the plans of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee with Comrade Xi Jinping at the core for developing the rule of law, Wang Chen, vice chairman of the NPC Standing Committee, told the session.

In addition to general and supplementary provisions, the Civil Code, the world‘s latest modern-day civil law, includes six parts on real rights, contracts, personality rights, marriage and family, inheritance, and tort liabilities.

The personal rights, property rights and other lawful rights and interests of the parties to civil legal relations shall be protected by law and shall not be infringed upon by any organization or individual, reads the Civil Code in its opening chapter.

Since the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, the Chinese have long yearned for a civil code of their own, said Wang.

China‘s earlier four attempts to draft a civil code since the 1950s did not succeed due to various reasons.

The legislative process started in June 2016 after the decision to draft the Civil Code was announced at a plenary session of the CPC Central Committee in October 2014. The General Provisions of the Civil Law was adopted in 2017. Beginning August 2018, the six individual draft parts were reviewed in different NPC Standing Committee sessions. In December 2019, a complete draft civil code was unveiled.

“Looking back in history, you’ll find that a civil code was usually born at a time of social stability and economic prosperity, and a civil code always ushered in a time of rapid economic and social development,” said Professor Yu Fei of China University of Political Science and Law. “We also have such expectations from China‘s Civil Code.”

PROTECTING PEOPLE’S DIGNITY

Dubbed an “encyclopedia on social life,” the Civil Code will protect Chinese citizens’ rights from cradle to grave, experts say. According to the code, even unborn children have the rights to inheritance and gifts.

A major innovation of China‘s Civil Code, jurists say, is embodied in the part on personality rights. While some countries have personality rights legal provisions, few have a specific law book in civil code dedicated to protecting personality rights.

The part on personality rights includes provisions on a civil subject’s rights to life, body, health, name, portrait, reputation and privacy, among others.

The part features stipulations on regulating studies related to human genes or embryos, strengthening privacy protection, banning sexual harassment, and other prominent issues of public concern.

The personality rights book shows that China has reached new heights in protecting people’s dignity, said Chen Jingying, a national lawmaker and vice president of East China University of Political Science and Law.

ADAPTING TO NEW REALITIES

While preparing the draft, the legislature sought public opinions on 10 occasions, receiving over 1 million online comments and suggestions.

Lawmakers say drafting the code is not about formulating a new civil law but rather systematically incorporating existing civil laws and regulations, modifying and improving them to adapt to new situations while maintaining their consistency.

Data and online virtual assets are also legally protected, according to the Civil Code.

It has clearly defined people’s privacy. Protected information has been expanded to include email addresses and location data.

The Civil Code has also fine-tuned several provisions to better protect people’s rights in case of emergencies such as the COVID-19 epidemic.

For example, if the guardian of a child is unable to perform his or her duties due to emergencies like being put under medical isolation, primary-level Party committees or civil affairs authorities must take over the guardianship, according to the code.

The Civil Code is a milestone in developing the socialist legal system with Chinese characteristics, and will boost the modernization of China‘s system and capacity for governance, said Wang Yi, dean of the law school at Renmin University of China.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Xinhua Special: China adopts world’s first modern-day civil code

Published

on

By

Chinese lawmakers Thursday voted to adopt the country’s long-expected Civil Code at the third session of the 13th National People‘s Congress (NPC), the top legislature.

The law will take effect on Jan. 1, 2021.

The closing meeting of third session of the 13th National People‘s Congress (NPC) is held at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, capital of China, May 28, 2020. (Xinhua/Ding Haitao)

The closing meeting of third session of the 13th National People‘s Congress (NPC) is held at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, capital of China, May 28, 2020. (Xinhua/Ding Haitao)

The Civil Code is the first law to carry the title ‘code’ for the People’s Republic of China. It lays down the fundamental principles and regulations regarding civil activities and relations. It reflects the will of the people and protect their rights and interests,” said Wang Liming, executive vice president of Renmin University of China and a law professor.

China‘s Civil Code will be the latest civil code born in the 21st century,” said Peng Chengxin, professor and vice dean of Koguan School of Law of Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

China had made four attempts to compile a civil code since 1949 only to stop for various reasons.

Nonetheless, China enacted the General Principles of Civil Law in 1986, and laws covering areas such as property, tort liability, contract, marriage, and inheritance continued to be added or updated. These laid the groundwork for a civil code.

Picture demonstrates a brief compilation process of China‘s draft civil code. (Xinhua/Gao Shan)

Picture demonstrates a brief compilation process of China‘s draft civil code. (Xinhua/Gao Shan)

The decision to compile a civil code was announced in October 2014, and the legislative process started in June 2016.

March 2017 saw the General Provisions of the Civil Law adopted.

By August 2018, six draft parts were ready for review by lawmakers.

Fast-forward to December 2019, following multiple reviews, public solicitations, other appraisal activities, and numerous revisions, a complete 84-chapter draft civil code was unveiled.

According to official statistics, in the course of compiling the draft civil code, 1.02 million pieces of advice had been solicited from around 425,000 people.

“Since we entered the new era, people’s incomes and living standards have seen remarkable improvements. Subsequently, people started to pursue a more vibrant spiritual life and developed higher demand for democracy, the rule of law, fairness, justice, and protection of private property and personal dignity,” said Wang Liming when explaining why China needs a civil code.

In fact, China already has a slew of stand-alone civil laws and regulations in place. But these laws, introduced at different times, sometimes overlap, and occasionally even contradict each other.

“The reason for that is we didn’t have a unified civil code. If we have one, it would be the first and overarching law that lawyers and judges could refer to when resolving civil cases,” said Wang Liming. “So this Civil Code will significantly help judges use law accurately, avoiding contradicting verdicts in similar cases.”

Wang Liming, executive vice president of Renmin University of China and a law professor, is interviewed by Xinhua in Beijing, capital of China, on May 22, 2020. (Xinhua/Tian Chenxu)

Wang Liming, executive vice president of Renmin University of China and a law professor, is interviewed by Xinhua in Beijing, capital of China, on May 22, 2020. (Xinhua/Tian Chenxu)

Li Jing, an NPC deputy and president of the Tianjin High People‘s Court said that the Civil Code will result in a more comprehensive, authoritative and effective rule for judgment, and more sufficient legal bases for courts and judges.

The Civil Code consists of the general provisions, the supplementary provisions, and six parts on property, contracts, personality rights, marriage and family, inheritance, and tort liability. It will serve as a systematic fundamental law in the civil and commercial fields.

It stipulates that all natural persons are equally entitled to civil rights, with unborn children entitled to inheritance and gifts.

It has a section regarding personality rights, which include rights to life, body, health, name, portrait, reputation, honor, privacy, and others.

It also protects information, email addresses and location data.

It states that the property rights of individuals are equally safeguarded to those of the State and collective, and online virtual assets are protected, too.

The code includes a provision requiring the adoption of appropriate measures to prevent sexual harassment in workplace, schools, and other institutions.

Minors who are victims of sexual abuse or assault can still claim through legal channels after they turn 18.

The code is also “green”, with those who harm others due to pollution or environmental damage set to bear tort liability.

The 1,260-article Civil Code also covers rental tenants’ rights, intellectual property protection, property inheritance, regulations on scientific studies related to human genes or embryos, and new rules on handling cyberspace torts, and many more.

Law experts say that the Civil Code highlights the respect and protection of individual’s freedom, dignity, interests and rights. It also responds to new changes and new problems in the modern society.

Li Shigang, professor and vice dean of Fudan University law school, is interviewed by Xinhua in Shanghai, east China, on May 21, 2020. (Xinhua/Sun Qing)

Li Shigang, professor and vice dean of Fudan University law school, is interviewed by Xinhua in Shanghai, east China, on May 21, 2020. (Xinhua/Sun Qing)

“In response to big data and other internet advances, the Civil Code includes new regulations regarding the protection of privacy and personal information. This was an issue that people deeply cared about,” said Li Shigang, professor and vice dean of Fudan University law school.

Peng Chengxin, professor and vice dean of Koguan School of Law of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is interviewed by Xinhua in Shanghai, east China, on May 20, 2020. (Xinhua/Sun Qing)

Peng Chengxin, professor and vice dean of Koguan School of Law of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is interviewed by Xinhua in Shanghai, east China, on May 20, 2020. (Xinhua/Sun Qing)

“Placing personality rights as a separate component to highlight the importance of personal freedom and dignity is original and extremely important,” said Peng Chengxin. “Another crucial point is that the value of saving natural resources and protecting the environment is prominent throughout the code.”

According to law professors, this legislation is much more than just a Chinese law for Chinese people.

Ning Hongli, professor at school of law at University of International Business and Economics, is interviewed by Xinhua in Beijing, capital of China, on May 22, 2020. (Xinhua/Tian Chenxu)

Ning Hongli, professor at school of law at University of International Business and Economics, is interviewed by Xinhua in Beijing, capital of China, on May 22, 2020. (Xinhua/Tian Chenxu)

China‘s Civil Code will have a significant impact on foreigners and foreign companies who do business here in China. The law will remarkably improve China‘s business environment, which is an excellent sign,” said Ning Hongli, professor at school of law at University of International Business and Economics.

The Civil Code demonstrates China‘s confidence and resolution to carry out the rule of law further. Foreign enterprises can come to China with their minds at ease as all their rights and interests will be fully protected by law,” said Peng Chengxin.

Whether it’s the right of unborn children or the legality of AI technology, China‘s Civil Code will affect the rights and interests of its people, and all those that call China home.

It also marks a new milestone: the completion of another stage in the modernization of China‘s governance system.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also