Connect with us

Agriculture

COVID-19 CURE: Scientists recommend Asthma plant for Coronavirus symptoms’ treatment

Published

on

Some scientists at the University of Ibadan have recommended a plant called Euphorbia Hirta as a herbal alternative to mitigating some of the diseases associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the scientists, some of the diseases, which the plant can cure, include dry cough, respiratory failures and fever, among others.

The scientists, including Profs. Ademola Ladele and Rasheed Awodoyin, told the News Agency of Nigeria in Ibadan on Tuesday that the Euphorbia Hirta was commonly called Asthma plant.

Awodoyin, a Weed Ecologist, said that the plant was known as Asin Uloko in Edo, Nonon Kurciya in Hausa, Chamma Chamma in Kanuri, Endamyel in Fula-Fulfulde (Borno), Ba Ala in Owerri and Akun Esan in Yoruba.

He listed the scientists who worked on the plant to include Prof. Olaniyi Babayemi (Animal Scientist), Prof. Olapeju Aiyelaagbe (Chemist), Dr Ahmed Abu (Animal Scientist), Dr Adeoluwa (Organic Agriculturist), Dr Olajumoke Fayinminnu (Toxicologist) and Dr Funmilayo Adebiyi (Animal Scientist).

Others, the don said, were Dr Idayat Gbadamosi (Ethnobotanist) and Dr J. Badejo (Drug Development Specialist) and Prof. Ademola Ladele (Agricultural Extensionist).

He said that the plant was a herbal alternative to curing dry cough, respiratory failures, fever and some other related symptoms of chronic flu, all of which were associated with COVID-19.

Awodoyin told NAN that the plant, after being boiled, could be taken as tea and could serve as first aid treatment for dry cough, while further complex solutions to the pandemic could still be explored.

He said that the scientists were sparked up by shared information that mucus plug of the airways and nasal chamber, among others were the causes of seizure and death from COVID-19.

“Asthma plant tea softens dry cough, releases the mucus as phlegm. It is a safe herb tea, though not recommended for pregnant women and should be taken for six consecutive days.

“Just get a handful of the plant, steep in boiling water for 15 minutes, drink freely, as the taste is pleasant. I use it at my family level. I don’t even use it for more than three days before getting immediate result,” Awodoyin said.

He emphasised that such medicinal plants had curative actions due to the presence of complex chemical constituents.
According to him, the plant contains triterpenes, phytosterols, tannins, polyphenols, flavonoids, essential oil, alkaloids, saponins, amino acids and minerals, with quercitrin, a flavanoid glycoside, isolated from the herb, showing anti-diarrhea activity.

Also speaking, the leader of the scientists, Prof. Ademola Ladele, said asthma plant could also be used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders (diarrhea, dysentery, intestinal parasitosis,) as well as bronchial and respiratory diseases (asthma, bronchitis, hay fever, flu).

“The aqueous extract from the plant exhibits anxiolytic, analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory activities; the root decoction of the plant are also beneficial for nursing mothers deficient in milk (galactogogue).

“The aqueous extract shows antioxidant effect and a free radical scavenging activity. It is used to lower blood pressure, treat athletes foot, dengue fever and for production of blood platelets.

“It can also be used to relieve anxiety and stress. In South India, it is used as ear drops in the treatment of boils, sore and wounds; a decoction of the leaves induces milk flow and the leaf chewed with palm kernel for restoration of virility.

“It is also effective in treating ulcers, while the plant is also eaten as a vegetable; it is a powerful herb which should be used in moderation.

“In Benin City, the plant is pounded, mixed with palm oil and licked to treat any type of cough,” he said.
Ladele added that although the plant was reported to have anti-fertility activity, report from Guinea revealed that the plant extract had practically no toxicity towards man and guinea pigs.

According to him, using the plant may help COVID-19 patients to breathe with ease and remove the need for a ventilator for mild cases.

“There is no evidence yet that asthma plant can cure Coronavirus, but it can be useful in mitigating some of the symptoms like fever, coughing and respiratory challenges.

“A research group at the University of Ibadan is exploring the benefits of other similar plants for the adequate cure of chronic flu and other respiratory diseases, including COVID-19,” he said.

Edited By: Oluyinka Fadare and (NAN)‘Wale Sadeeq

Foreign

Mongolia confirms 6 new COVID-19 cases, 185 in total

Published

on

By

Mongolia reported six new cases of COVID-19 over the last 24 hours, bringing the national count to 185, the country’s National Center for Communicable Disease (NCCD) said Monday.

“A total of 371 tests for COVID-19 were conducted in the country yesterday and six of them were positive,” NCCD head Dulmaa Nyamkhuu told a daily press conference.

The new patients are Mongolian nationals who returned home from Russia on May 15, said Nyamkhuu.

All the COVID-19 cases in Mongolia were imported, mostly from Russia. Among them, a total of 44 patients, including four foreigners, have recovered.

No local transmissions or deaths have been reported in the Asian country so far.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

India reports highest daily spike of 8,392 COVID-19 cases as total reach 190,535

Published

on

By

India’s federal health ministry Monday morning reported 230 new deaths due to COVID-19 and 8,392 more positive cases during the past 24 hours across the country, taking the number of deaths to 5,394 and total cases to 190,535.

This was so far the highest single-day spike in the cases.

According to officials, 91,819 people have been discharged from hospitals after showing improvement.

“The number of active cases in the country right now is 93,322,” reads the information.

The fifth phase of the nationwide lockdown came into force from Monday, making several relaxations and reopening in a phased manner.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced a nationwide lockdown On March 25 to contain the spread of COVID-19 and break the chain of infection.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

S. Korea reports 35 more COVID-19 cases, 11,503 in total

Published

on

By

South Korea reported 35 more cases of the COVID-19 compared to 24 hours ago as of 0:00 a.m. Monday local time, raising the total number of infections to 11,503.

After peaking at 79 on Thursday, the daily caseload continued to fall to 27 on Sunday, but it rebounded on Monday amid small cluster infections from religious gatherings in the metropolitan area.

Of the new cases, five were imported, lifting the combined figure to 1,264.

One more death was confirmed, leaving the death toll at 271. The total fatality rate stood at 2.36 percent.

A total of 17 more patients were discharged from quarantine after making full recovery, pulling up the combined number of recoveries to 10,422. The total recovery rate was 90.6 percent.

Since Jan. 3, the country has tested more than 921,000 people, among whom 885,830 tested negative for the virus and 24,058 are being checked.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Spotlight: More countries to ease COVID-19 restrictions as global cases rise with Latin America as new epicenter

Published

on

By

More countries in Europe and Asia began to ease restrictions and resume operations, but more than 1 million cases of COVID-19 have been recorded in Latin America and the Caribbean, now the new epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic.

Globally, confirmed COVID-19 cases have surpassed 6.16 million, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.

NEW EPICENTER

Brazil on Sunday said its nationwide tally of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 514,849 after 16,409 people tested positive in the past 24 hours, while the death toll neared 30,000.

Its death toll rose to 29,314, the fourth highest in the global pandemic after the United States, Britain and Italy, after 480 deaths had been reported since Saturday, while another 4,208 deaths are still being investigated for any linkage with COVID-19, the Ministry of Health said.

Also on Sunday, Mexico‘s Deputy Health Minister Hugo Lopez-Gatell said that the country reported 3,152 new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in the country to 90,664.

There were 151 new coronavirus deaths in Mexico, taking total fatalities to 9,930, Lopez-Gatell added.

Meanwhile, Chile‘s COVID-19 cases increased by 4,830 to reach 99,688 on Sunday.

In the past 24 hours, 57 more patients died, the highest number of fatalities in a single day so far, taking the death toll from the disease to 1,054.

A lockdown is in effect in the capital Santiago and the metropolitan area through June 5, as the region is the epicenter of the country’s outbreak.

In recent weeks, Chile has seen an exponential rise in the number of cases and deaths, leading the government to set up field hospitals to deal with the growing number of patients.

EASING RESTRICTIONS

Italy has now recorded fewer than 600 new cases per day for eight consecutive days, a dramatic drop from peaks of more than 6,000 new infections a day, when Italy was the epicenter of the pandemic in late March.

Recent trends show that the spread of the virus has slowed dramatically despite a gradual easing of Italy’s national lockdown at a two-week interval, first on May 4 and again on May 18.

The next step toward easing will come on June 3, when Italians will be allowed to move freely between regions even if for non-essential reasons. It will be the first time such travels will be allowed since March 9, the day before the national lockdown entered into force.

Many businesses across Turkey on Sunday also prepared to resume operation for the first time after over two months of closure amid a slowdown in the spread of COVID-19.

Restaurants, cafes, parks, beaches, daycare centers, kindergartens, libraries, sports facilities, swimming pools, and museums will be operational as of June 1 as part of the new normalization process announced on May 28.

Following the announcement, the Health Ministry prepared a guide in particular for the eating and drinking industry, explaining the new rules in a detailed way.

Likewise, the Egyptian government on Sunday announced a decision to reduce its curfew from 10 hours to nine, following a meeting led by Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly.

The government has already started gradual reopening of services and offices suspended since mid-March amid a “coexistence plan” to maintain anti-coronavirus precautionary measures while resuming services, businesses and economic activities.

Chairing Saturday‘s Downing Street daily briefing, British Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said Britons will be able to exercise outside with up to five others from different households from Monday, provided that strict social distancing guidelines are followed.

He also announced that from Monday, competitive sport will be allowed behind closed doors in England, paving the way for the return of live sports on TV screens in almost three months.

The move came as some experts warned that lifting restrictions before cases come down is too “risky.” Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, England‘s deputy chief medical officer, said that Britons need to “actually follow the guidance.”

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

COVID-19 hotspots in South Africa may be placed on higher alert level: president

Published

on

By

Some COVID-19 hotspots in South Africa may be placed on a higher alert if special interventions fail to contain the pandemic, President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Sunday.

Different approaches have been introduced to deal with high-infection areas, known as hotspots, and low-infection areas, which require vigilance and surveillance, Ramaphosa said during a virtual engagement with the South African National Editors Forum.

The remarks came a day before the country is set to lower the alert level from four to three, under which 8 million people will be allowed to return to work as most economic sectors in the country reopen.

“We are re-opening most areas of the economy so that people can earn a living, and so that this immediate health crisis does not result in a permanent economic crisis,” Ramaphosa said.

But hotspots where confirmed cases rise at a fast rate remain a concern, particularly after the further easing of restrictions, the president said.

Special interventions will be made in hotspot areas by deploying dedicated, multidisciplinary teams to contain the outbreak, including epidemiologists, doctors, nurses and community health workers, he added.

As of Sunday, the country reported 32,683 cases of COVID-19 with 683 deaths. The Western Cape, the hardest-hit province, recorded 21,382 cases with 503 deaths.

“It is of utmost importance that we reduce the rate of spread in the Western Cape and we do everything possible to prevent other parts of the country from following a similar trajectory,” Ramaphosa said.

Each hotspot will be linked to testing and quarantine facilities, and additional hospital beds when necessary, with a close focus on tracing contacts and isolating them so as to prevent further transmission, Ramaphosa said.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Peru confirms 8,805 new COVID-19 cases as total hits 164,476

Published

on

By

Peru reported 8,805 new confirmed COVID-19 cases and 135 new deaths on Sunday, bringing the total caseload of infections to 164,476 and the death toll to 4,506.

Currently, 8,882 COVID-19 patients are hospitalized, with 988 in intensive care units and on ventilators, the Health Ministry said.

Peru will continue to use the controversial drug hydroxychloroquine to treat patients, Health Minister Victor Zamora said, adding that it was recommended by a team of experts.

The World Health Organization has recently advised against using the medication on COVID-19 patients due to an estimated higher mortality rate caused by the drug.

Peru’s lockdown has been extended to June 30 in a bid to contain the coronavirus outbreak.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Brazil’s COVID-19 cases top 500,000, death toll nears 30,000

Published

on

By

Brazil on Sunday said its nationwide tally of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 514,84 after 16,409 people tested positive in the past 24 hours, while the death toll neared 30,000.

The death toll rose to 29,314 after 480 deaths had been reported since Saturday, while another 4,208 deaths are still being investigated for any linkage with COVID-19, the Ministry of Health said.

The number of recoveries from COVID-19 totalled 206,555, the ministry added.

Southeast Sao Paulo state continues to be the epicenter of the national outbreak, with 7,615 deaths and 109,698 infections, followed by Rio de Janeiro with 5,344 deaths and 53,388 infections.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Measures taken to curb spread of COVID-19 at Tribhuvan Int’l Airport

Published

on

By

A Nepalese police officer walks at the Tribhuvan International Airport amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Kathmandu, Nepal, on May 31, 2020. (Photo by Sulav Shrestha/Xinhua)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Chile’s COVID-19 cases rise to 99,688, with 1,054 deaths

Published

on

By

Chile on Sunday reported 99,688 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 1,054 deaths from the disease.

In the past 24 hours ending 9 p.m. Saturday, 4,830 new cases were detected and 57 more patients died, the highest number of fatalities in a single day so far.

Of the new cases of infection, 4,437 presented symptoms and 393 were asymptomatic.

Since the beginning of the outbreak here, 42,727 people have recovered from the virus and 582,440 tests have been applied.

A lockdown is in effect in the capital Santiago and the metropolitan area through June 5, as the region is the epicenter of the country’s outbreak, with 80 percent of all infections and 775 deaths.

The lockdown, which was extended from its original deadline in May, has generated some unrest among the region’s 7 million inhabitants, with protests breaking out especially in poorer districts over a “lack” of government aid to offset the economic hardships.

In recent weeks, Chile has seen an exponential rise in the number of cases and deaths, leading the government to set up field hospitals to deal with the growing number of patients.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also