Connect with us

Foreign

Jakarta begins trial run of Indonesia’s first metro system

Published

on

Jakarta begins trial run of Indonesia’s first metro system

Officials hope that the so-called mass rapid transit system or MRT, will reduce traffic congestion, which is infamously bad in the city of about 10 million people.

“It’s very comfortable. I feel like I’m in Singapore,’’ 35-year-old Akbar Mapaleo, who brought his wife and two young children, said.

Construction on the 16-kilometre line, funded by Japan, began in 2014 and cost 16 trillion rupiah (1.1 billion dollars).

It consists of six underground and seven elevated stations.

Until this year, Jakarta was one of the world’s few megacities without a metro line.

“Today, we start a new culture of commuting.

“The MRT alone won’t solve the problem of traffic jams, but with integration with other modes of transport, such as the rapid bus system, hopefully congestion can be reduced.

“Construction will begin this year on a second line, extending 8.6 kilometres to the city’s north,’’ he said.

Foreign

Makeshift quarantine tents prepared in Central Jakarta Art Building, Indonesia

Published

on

By

Makeshift quarantine tents prepared for people who have received COVID-19 rapid test are seen in the Central Jakarta Art Building at Tanah Abang, Jakarta, Indonesia, May 18, 2020. (Xinhua/Veri Sanovri)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Sumatran tigers play in Ragunan Zoo amid COVID-19 outbreak in Jakarta

Published

on

By

A Sumatran tiger plays with a ball during an Instagram Live program in Ragunan Zoo amid the COVID-19 outbreak in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 17, 2020. Ragunan Zoo management has prepared the Instagram Live program since the zoo is closed to the public amid the COVID-19 outbreak. (Xinhua/Agung Kuncahya B.)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Indonesian Red Cross vehicle sprays disinfectant to prevent COVID-19 in Jakarta

Published

on

By

An Indonesian Red Cross vehicle sprays disinfectant to prevent COVID-19 in a street in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 15, 2020. (Photo by Zulkarnain/Xinhua)

Continue Reading

Foreign

First multi-span rigid frame continuous beam for Indonesia’s Jakarta-Bandung High Speed Railway closed

Published

on

By

Aerial photo taken on May 10, 2020 shows the multi-span rigid frame continuous beam for the No.2 Bridge of Indonesia’s Jakarta-Bandung High Speed Railway in Indonesia. The first multi-span rigid frame continuous beam for the No.2 Bridge of Indonesia’s Jakarta-Bandung High Speed Railway was successfully closed on Sunday. The steel structure continuous beam, which is being constructed by Power Construction Corporation of China, has a total length of 213.8 meters, crossing two highway ramps and an overpass, with dense land transportation networks and complex construction environment. In 2016, the construction of Jakarta-Bandung High Speed Railway project was launched. The 142.3 km-long project will connect the country’s capital Jakarta and Bandung in West Java province. (Xinhua/Du Yu)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Tunnel 3 of Indonesia’s Jakarta-Bandung high speed railway drilled through

Published

on

By

The Tunnel 3 of the Jakarta-Bandung high speed railway (JBHSR) project was drilled through on Sunday, which is the third drilled-through tunnel after the Walini Tunnel and Tunnel 5.

Tunnel 3 project has been undertaken by Power Construction Corporation of China JBHSR Project Team since April 13 last year, with 735 meters in total length, 5.8 meters minimal and 60.5 meters maximal embedded depth.

In the construction process, the project team resolved the collapse problem resulting from unfavorable geologic conditions and tropical rainforest climate, and they also trained local technicians who will play important roles in the future working.

Jakarta-Bandung HSR has a total length of 142.3 km with 13 tunnels, and a designed speed of 350 km/h. When it is put into running, the commute time from Jakarta to Bandung will be decreased from over three hours to 40 minutes.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Staff member arranges social assistance packages in Jakarta, Indonesia

Published

on

By

A staff member of state-owned postal company PT Pos Indonesia arranges social assistance packages in Jakarta, Indonesia, April 21, 2020. The social assistance packages by government will be distributed to Jakarta residents cooperated with PT Pos Indonesia and online-based motorcycle taxi drivers. (Photo by Zulkarnain/Xinhua)

   1 2 Next   

Continue Reading

Foreign

Jakarta closes schools as Indonesia’s coronavirus cases jump to 96

Published

on

 

Authorities in the Indonesian capital will close all schools for two weeks as the number of confirmed cases of the new coronavirus in the country jumped to 96 on Saturday.

Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan said schools would be shut starting on Monday and lessons would have to given remotely.

“This is for the safety of all of us and we hope that people will reduce activities outside their homes,” Baswedan said.

The Jakarta administration on Friday announced the closure of 17 theme parks and amusement centres as a precaution.

Twenty-seven more people tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the number of confirmed cases to 96, four of them fatal, said Achmad Yurianto, spokesman for the Health Ministry.

YEE

Edited By: Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Indonesian leader reaffirms plan to move capital from sinking Jakarta

Published

on

The Indonesian President, Joko Widodo, on Thursday reaffirmed that the country’s capital would be moved to Borneo island from sinking and traffic-clogged Jakarta.

“Our country’s capital will move to Kalimantan Island. The location can be in Central Kalimantan, East Kalimantan or South Kalimantan.

“All aspects are being studied thoroughly so that the decision will be in line with our national vision for the next 10, 50, 100 years,“Joko said.

The city of Palangkaraya and an area near oil-rich Balikpapan had been considered among the likely sites for the new capital.

Experts, however, said that unlike other parts of Indonesia, most of Borneo was not prone to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

The government wants to start moving to a new capital by 2024, at the end of Joko’s second five-year term in office.

According to National Development Planning Minister, Bambang Brodjonegoro, such a move could cost up to 33 billion dollars.

“Funding will involve allowing developers to manage government-owned property in Jakarta in return to assist in building the future new city.

“The government has cited traffic congestion, frequent flooding and faster land subsidence as the main considerations for the move.

“About 40 per cent of Jakarta, a metropolis of 10 million people, is now below sea level and keeps sinking,“ Brodjonegoro said.

Meanwhile, the greater Jakarta area including satellite cities is home to 30 million people.

The government said economic losses caused by the city’s traffic jams were estimated at 100 trillion rupiah (7 billion dollars) a year.

Jakarta is considered to be one of the fastest-sinking cities in the world. If this goes unchecked, parts of the megacity could be entirely submerged by 2050, say researchers. Is it too late?

It sits on swampy land, the Java Sea lapping against it, and 13 rivers running through it. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that flooding is frequent in Jakarta and, according to experts, it is getting worse. But it’s not just about freak floods, this massive city is literally disappearing into the ground.

“The potential for Jakarta to be submerged isn’t a laughing matter.

“If we look at our models, by 2050 about 95% of North Jakarta will be submerged,” says Heri Andreas, who has studied Jakarta’s land subsidence for the past 20 years at the Bandung Institute of Technology.

It’s already happening – North Jakarta has sunk 2.5m in 10 years and is continuing to sink by as much as 25cm a year in some parts, which is more than double the global average for coastal megacities.

Jakarta is sinking by an average of 1-15cm a year and almost half the city now sits below sea level.

The impact is immediately apparent in North Jakarta. (dpa/NAN)

YI/YEE

Continue Reading

Foreign

Tsunami warning issued after magnitude 7.4 earthquake rocks Jakarta

Published

on

 A magnitude 7.4 earthquake has rocked the Indonesian capital Jakarta, prompting a tsunami warning for a neighbouring area, the country’s geophysics agency said on Friday.

The quake struck at 7:03 pm (1203 GMT) with an epicentre 147 kilometres south west of Sumur in neighbouring Banten province and at a depth of 10 kilometres.

Residents at an apartment complex in Jakarta rushed out in panic as the high rise building swayed and made a cracking sound.

The national geophysics agency said coastal areas such as Pandeglang in the western tip of Java and West Lampung on Sumatra island were at risk of being hit by a tsunami.

There were no immediate reports of damage.

 

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also