Connect with us

Foreign

Kenyan finance minister sacked after arrest on corruption charges

Published

on

A government spokesman said that Rotich was detained by Kenyan police on Monday after the head of public prosecutions ordered his arrest over the construction of two mega dams, which allegedly led to the loss of millions of dollars in taxpayer money.

Rotich will be replaced by the current Labour Minister Ukur Yattani, state house spokesperson Kanze Dena said in a statement.

Italian company CMC Di Ravenna was awarded the tender to construct the dams despite being under liquidation back in Italy.

He was charged with abuse of office, conspiracy to defraud, financial misconduct and fraudulent acquisition of public property, among other things, on Tuesday and released on bail.

This comes amidst growing calls for President Uhuru Kenyatta to crack down on civil servants accused of graft.

(Edited by Emmanuel Yashim)

Foreign

Feature: Kenyan slum dwellers on edge amid spike in COVID-19 cases

Published

on

By

Johnston Waweru huddles around a communal water point with nearly ten other people, all eagerly waiting to fetch water, a precious commodity in the informal settlement area. Here, the idea of social distancing is a myth.

The middle-aged casual laborer is a resident of the densely inhabited Kiambiu slums, located on the eastern edges of the Kenyan capital, Nairobi.

Kiambiu slum is characterized by littered broken bottles, haphazardly disposed face coverings, the trade of uncovered cooked food and close engagements of area residents oblivious of a looming danger.

Waweru’s living environment mirrors the circumstances inhibiting containment measures aimed at slowing the spread of coronavirus in Kenya’s informal settlement areas.

“Social distancing is impossible if not unachievable because of our poor economic status. Our quarters are thinly spaced out leaving no adequate space for the pathways,” said Waweru. “It is common to rub shoulders with people along the narrow paths.”

Last year’s national census put Kenya’s urban informal settlement population at over 1.5 million. The presence of a large population coupled with poor sanitation has made these areas a ticking time bomb.

Some major slums in Nairobi that have seen a spike of positive cases include, Kibra, Mathare, Mukuru kwa Njenga, Mukuru kwa Ruben and Kawangware.

The government established an exponential rise in cases after conducting targeted testing in these areas.

Waweru says that his community is aware of a simmering health crisis, however implementing some directives such as hunkering down at home is not an option for people who live from hand to mouth.

“We are making use of handwashing stations donated by well-wishers as well as donning our face masks but we still feel at risk. Financial constraints have kept residents with underlying health conditions out of hospital, leaving them vulnerable to COVID-19,” Waweru told Xinhua during a recent interview.

Kibra, the largest slum in Africa has recorded more than 200 positive cases and the government has alluded at introducing further measures in addition to the dawn to dusk curfew, to protect the area from a disastrous eventuality.

“We are continuing to watch this epicenter within Kibra and are mapping out clusters because it’s possible that not the entire Kibra has cases. Meanwhile, measures to completely lock them down are on the table and the government will effect this when it feels it’s necessary,” said Rashid Aman, chief administrative secretary, Ministry of Health.

On account of this situation, community interventions as well as grass-root authority has been singled out by health experts as an effective way of sensitizing communities living in the urban slums.

“My administration has been conducting community sensitization through community healthcare volunteers who move from home to home educating residents on preventive inexpensive measures they can adopt to keep the disease at bay,” said Paul Runo, an administrator at Kiambiu slums.

He said that his administration continues to receive donations of masks, sanitizers as well as soap from the national government while reiterating his commitment to working with local communities to protect them from the disease.

“My administration will continue to enforce comprehensive and rigorous preventive measures to ensure the disease does not penetrate into the area,” said Runo.

Even as Kenya started recording COVID-19 cases in three digits, President Uhuru Kenyatta recently hinted at de-escalating restriction measures in the country.

“We cannot be in lockdown forever, we have to reopen our economy somehow as much as we are seeing cases rising. We are also seeing more people recovering and not many people dying,” Kenyatta said.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Roundup: Kenyans ready for partial lifting of COVID-19 restrictions

Published

on

By

A cloud of expectation hangs over Kenya as citizens are ready for the easing of some restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the COVID-19.

Private businesses, places of worship and government offices are among entities that are gearing up for the resumption of operations after June 6, the day when current restrictions end and President Uhuru Kenyatta is expected to review the measures.

Kenyatta hinted that the government will loosen some of the restrictions, noting that lockdowns and curfews are unsustainable in the long term.

He noted that once the restrictions are partially lifted, citizens will be expected to remain responsible by wearing masks, washing hands and maintaining social distancing to curb the spread of the disease.

Kenya imposed a partial lockdown in the capital Nairobi and four other counties some 70 days ago and imposed a dusk-to-dawn curfew across the country, which are the restrictions lauded for slowing down infections.

But they have affected business for schools, gyms, bars and hotels, among others, with up to 1.2 million people losing jobs, according to the Labor Ministry of Kenya.

It is these businesses that are ready to reopen by installing handwashing and sanitation points and measures to enforce social distancing.

At a hotel along Moi Avenue in the central business district in Nairobi on Thursday, a worker was busy fumigating the facility.

In a separate section, another was remodeling chairs and tables to comply with measures to curb the spread of the disease in anticipation of the partial reopening of the country.

And at the entrance, a handwashing point was prominently installed as well as sanitizers at various points.

Like many other such facilities, all its workers would be expected to take COVID-19 tests and get certificates to show they are free of the disease.

“We were not offering to take away services or did not open earlier because it did not make sense to reopen when workers are still at home. But we believe this is the right time when the government is expected to loosen some restrictions,” said a worker introduced as Martin Kinuthia.

Places of worship are also instituting measures to allow the resumption of services.

Among the new protocols, they are taking the use of thermo guns, having shorter services, ensuring all worshippers sanitize by washing hands and installation of sanitation booths and everyone must wear face masks.

“As we wait for the presidential directive, it has been agreed upon by the government and religious leaders that the following measures must be taken. There shall be a sitting plan with markings on the floor where chairs will be placed observing the 1.5 meter rule in all directions,” said John Kitula, the administrative secretary of the African Inland Church.

Other places of worship, including mosques, will follow the same protocols to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Karanja Kibicho, Interior Principal Secretary of Kenya, said on Wednesday that the government has found itself in a tight spot since the outbreak of the disease, whose cases have taken an upward trajectory, clocking 2,340 on Thursday.

“We cannot stay in a lockdown forever, as a government we make money from taxes but most people are currently not working. We must reopen the economy but under strict guidelines,” said Kibicho.

But as the cloud of optimism hangs over Kenya amid the rise in infections, health experts have warned that most citizens are throwing caution to the wind by resuming old behavior that does not help to curb the spread of the virus.

Health Secretary Mutahi Kagwe on Thursday acknowledged that the government would ease some of the restrictions as it moves to adopt a home-care approach, but COVID-19 remains a huge threat to the east African nation.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Retired Kenyan athletes to benefit from COVID-19 food relief

Published

on

By

Retired Kenyan athletes who have been financially effected by the COVID-19 pandemic are set to benefit from a food relief program launched by the local Olympics committee on Wednesday.

The initiative, that was started with seed capital of over 500,000 shillings (4,700 United States dollars) by the National Olympics Committee of Kenya (NOCK), will initially target athletes who retired by 2004 and have competed for Kenya in the Olympics, Commonwealth Games and African Championships.

This is after the group was identified according to NOCK to be the “most vulnerable” by the spread of the coronavirus pandemic since Kenya declared its first case in mid-March.

“Food support has been identified as a critical priority need area of focus for the next three months. We want to give food support to retired athletes.

“After consultation, we felt food aid will be of greater assistance as we continue looking for other partners in this initiative,” the acting general secretary of NOCK, Francis Mutuku, said.

He added that a mobile phone contribution service number will be launched on Monday next week to enable the public to contribute towards cushioning needy athletes through the COVID-19 crisis.

The program is the latest relief effort targeted towards athletes in Kenya with active athletes starting to receive 95 dollars each from the Ministry of Sports kitty that rolled out last week as part of a state-run effort to alleviate the suffering brought by loss of income due to COVID-19.

The Olympic champion and world marathon record holder, Eliud Kipchoge, has been distributing relief food to athletes in the vast and talent-rich Rift Valley for three weeks now.

“Many people have lost their relatives due to the virus and I want to ask them to take heart at this trying moment. Countries have lost many people and we are experiencing worse situations but it will come to pass,” said Kipchoge, the first man to run the 42.195km marathon distance in under two hours.

The food rations donated by Kipchoge, in addition to the government stimulant fund, have benefitted the likes of Beijing 2008 Paralympics star, Abraham Tarbei, who won gold medals in the 1,500 meters T46 and 5,000 meters T46 as he continues to train in isolation in Kaptagat, western Kenya.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Kenyans adopt new greeting habits amid coronavirus pandemic

Published

on

As COVID-19 cases take an upward trend in Kenya, reaching 2,093 on Tuesday, citizens are adopting new greeting habits, such as elbow bumps, which are helping people socialise as they maintain hygiene and keep social distance to curb the spread of the disease.

With handshakes, hugs, cheek kisses, and shoulder bumps among other forms of salutations dead, thanks to the new coronavirus pandemic, new forms of greetings considered safer are taking root in Kenya, both in official and informal circles.

One such a greeting that is taking the east African nation by storm is elbow bump as citizens consider it much safer.

From the old to the young, men and women, elbow bumps have now become the official greetings of Kenyans both in formal and informal settings like homes.

President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy William Ruto cemented the greeting in Kenya’s formal circles on Monday when they used it during independence celebrations in Nairobi, the capital.

Wearing masks, clenching their fists and smiling, Kenyatta and Ruto bumped their elbows to greet each other.

Their greeting did not only acknowledge the popularity of the salutation amid the pandemic, but it also confirmed to citizens that they can use it.

Several dignitaries at the event that was attended by few government officials and opposition leaders also used the elbow bump to greet each other.

“I have been using the elbow bump since last month.

“Some people have been comfortable with it, others are not, avoiding contact but when I saw the president use it on Monday, I felt happy, that this is the greeting for those of us who are used to handshakes,” said Gilbert Wandera, a businessman in Nairobi.

Wandera, who sells computers, had shunned any form of contact greeting when the disease broke out to maintain hygiene.

But I changed my mind as people embraced face masks and other sanitation measures.

“Besides, elbow bumps are a little safer because chances that you will touch your face with the elbow are nil,” he said.

The greeting has also been embraced in households, corporate offices, operators of public transport vehicles commonly known as matatus, commuters, motorbike taxi riders and traders among others as it quenches citizens’ thirst to shake hands.

Besides elbow bumps, other forms of greetings that Kenyans are using include foot taps and hand on my heart – what the World Health Organisation recommends.

But these are not as popular as elbow bumps.

Another culture that has taken root in the east African nation, thanks to the pandemic is the wearing of face masks.

Initially, wearing of masks was seen as a mark of style mainly done by the sophisticated or wealthy, but it has now been embraced by all citizens, with thousands hardly venturing out of their houses without the gadget.

“I am also finding myself maintaining the 1.5m social distance in public places naturally.

“No one is reminding me to keep distance in supermarkets, at ATMs, in public transport vehicles or in the office.

“And this is what many other people are doing.

“It is now a culture that is helping curb the disease,” said Victoria Selima, a government auditor.

Initially, funerals in the east African nation would attract hundreds of people, some who would stay at the affected families’ homes for days mourning.

But with COVID-19, citizens have learnt to keep away from the events without being forced by government officials, noted Victor Mulanda, who traveled to western Kenya on Monday from the capital for a funeral.

Rashid Aman, Kenya’s health chief administrative secretary, noted Tuesday that citizens must be responsible and embrace new norms to beat the disease that is currently deeply entrenched in community across the east African nation.

Edited By: Emmanuel Yashim (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Roundup: Kenyans adopt new greeting habits amid COVID-19 pandemic

Published

on

By

As COVID-19 cases take an upward trend in Kenya, reaching 2,093 on Tuesday, citizens are adopting new greeting habits, such as elbow bumps, which are helping people socialize as they maintain hygiene and keep social distance to curb the spread of the disease.

With handshakes, hugs, cheek kisses and shoulder bumps among other forms of salutations dead, thanks to the new coronavirus disease pandemic, new forms of greetings considered safer are taking root in Kenya, both in official and informal circles.

One such a greeting that is taking the east African nation by storm is elbow bump as citizens consider it much safer.

From the old to the young, men and women, elbow bumps have now become the official greetings of Kenyans both in formal and informal settings like homes.

President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy William Ruto cemented the greeting in Kenya’s formal circles on Monday when they used it during independence celebrations in Nairobi, the capital.

Wearing masks, clenching their fists and smiling, Kenyatta and Ruto bumped their elbows to greet each other.

Their greeting did not only acknowledge the popularity of the salutation amid the pandemic, but it also confirmed to citizens that they can use it.

Several dignitaries at the event that was attended by few government officials and opposition leaders also used the elbow bump to greet each other.

“I have been using the elbow bump since last month, some people have been comfortable with it, others are not, avoiding contact but when I saw the president use it on Monday, I felt happy, that this is the greeting for those of us who are used to handshakes,” said Gilbert Wandera, a businessman in Nairobi.

Wandera, who sells computers, had shunned any form of contact greeting when the disease broke out to maintain hygiene.

But I changed my mind as people embraced face masks and other sanitation measures. Besides, elbow bumps are a little safer because chances that you will touch your face with the elbow are nil,” he said.

The greeting has also been embraced in households, corporate offices, operators of public transport vehicles commonly known as matatus, commuters, motorbike taxi riders and traders among others as it quenches citizens’ thirst to shake hands.

Besides elbow bumps, other forms of greetings that Kenyans are using include foot taps and hand on my heart, what the World Health Organization recommends. But these are not as popular as elbow bumps.

Another culture that has taken root in the east African nation, thanks to the pandemic is the wearing of face masks. Initially, wearing of masks was seen as a mark of style mainly done by the sophisticated or wealthy, but it has now been embraced by all citizens, with thousands hardly venturing out of their houses without the gadget.

“I am also finding myself maintaining the 1.5m social distance in public places naturally. No one is reminding me to keep distance in supermarkets, at ATMs, in public transport vehicles or in the office. And this is what many other people are doing. It is now a culture that is helping curb the disease,” said Victoria Selima, a government auditor.

Initially, funerals in the east African nation would attract hundreds of people, some who would stay at the affected families’ homes for days mourning.

But with COVID-19, citizens have learnt to keep away from the events without being forced by government officials, noted Victor Mulanda, who traveled to western Kenya on Monday from the capital for a funeral.

Rashid Aman, Kenya‘s health chief administrative secretary, noted Tuesday that citizens must be responsible and embrace new norms to beat the disease that is currently deeply entrenched in community across the east African nation.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Kenyan farmers mark global milk day amid calls for adoption of climate-smart animals

Published

on

By

Kenyan dairy farmers on Monday joined their counterparts from across the globe to mark the World Milk Day as experts rooted for adoption of more hardy animals to enhance production amid challenges of climate change.

The day was founded some 20 years ago by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations to distinguish the importance of milk as a food and to celebrate the dairy sector.

This year, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, FAO discouraged the holding of in-person events, calling for social media celebrations.

After milking their animals on Monday, some of the dairy farmers in the east African nation toasted their produce in celebration of resilience and hope for more production amid rising challenges.

East African nation milk producers are currently facing a myriad of challenges among them shrinking land sizes, erratic weather conditions due to climate change and restrictions to curb the spread of new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) that have shrunk the market.

Climate change effects have led to erratic pasture production and increased disease and pest incidences.

But still, the farmers have been resilient, producing up to 60 million liters of milk a month or 720 million liters annually, according to the Kenya Dairy Board.

Rachel Kinyua, a farmer from Meru County in central Kenya, is among those earning a living from milk that her six cows, out of the 15 she keeps, produce.

She gets 160 litres of milk every day and delivers to the Meru Union Dairy Cooperative Society, which buys at 35 shillings (about 0.35 United States dollars) per liter.

“I am happy with the yield but I want to increase the number of milkers to 10, though challenges like severe drought affect production,” Kinyua, who keeps Friesian animals, which are very high feeders, said.

But as dairy production goes on, experts are calling for adoption of climate-smart animals that are not only hardy but also offer more on less feeds.

These include dairy goats, crossbreed cows, camels and sheep. For the goats, crossbreeds of Alpines and Toggenburgs — European breeds — have emerged as the most popular among Kenyan farmers seeking to produce more milk.

Similarly, crossbreeds of Sahiwals, Fleckvieh and local breed Zebu cattle have also been embraced by dairy farmers in the east African nation.

For sheep, farmers are embracing crossbreeds of traditional Red Maasai, Boer and Dorper, the last two which are resilient and imported from South Africa.

Camels, on the other hand, are being adopted by farmers in arid and semi-arid areas due to their hardy nature.

Initially, the animals were mainly kept in northern Kenya but more farmers in the south, Coast and eastern parts of the country are embracing camels as their milk products like yogurt, fresh milk and meat become mainstreamed in the east African nation’s market.

There are at least three million camels in Kenya, mostly kept by pastoralists in the north, with the number growing steadily over recent years.

George Gitao, a professor of veterinary medicine at the University of Nairobi, noted camels are more important now than ever because they are tough, survive in drought and pollute less.

“Camels produce one of the most nutritious milks and the world‘s best wools, good leather and extremely healthy meat,” he said.

Bernard Faye, a veterinarian and chair of the International Society of Camelid Research and Development, observed that the global camel market is projected to grow at more than 10 percent for the next decade, thus, farmers must produce more of its milk and meat in the future to reap from the animals.

Besides the resilient livestock, experts are advising for adoption of hardy but nutritious fodder that helps in production of more milk from the animals.

These fodder include panicum, cobra and cayman grasses that are not only nutritious to animals but also regrow faster after cutting, thus, allowing farmers to have plenty of fodder even with little rains, according to Fredrick Muthomi, an agronomist.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Anti-COVID-19 restrictions among East Africa countries boon for Kenyan farmers

Published

on

By

Restriction of movement between east African countries to curb spread of COVID-19 has come as a boon for Kenyan farmers, whose produce is currently selling at a better price as food demand surges.

The restrictions have seen a decline in food imports, allowing Kenyan farmers’ produce to dominate the market.

Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania have each limited movement of goods and people into and out of their borders.

While travel of people between the countries has been banned, movement of goods and cargo is allowed.

However, the transporters have to test for COVID-19 and get certificates to show they don’t have the disease.

The testing has occasioned delays, curtailing free movement of goods, thus creating a boon to Kenyan food producers.

Kenya imports a bulk of food produce from its neighbors Uganda and Tanzania. From Uganda, the country imports cereals, legumes, sugar and eggs mainly.

And from Tanzania comes fruits like oranges, lemons, pineapples and mangoes, onions, potatoes and tomatoes.

“It is a good time to be a farmer in Kenya because prices of commodities are now high due to COVID-19 restrictions. I produce eggs, at least 100 crates a day and for the first time, buyers are scrambling for them,” said Cornelius Mutuku, a farmer in Kitengela on the south of Nairobi.

Farmers growing onions and tomatoes are also enjoying the boom as imports from Tanzania remain restricted.

At Wakulima food market in the capital Nairobi, where most produce from Tanzania is usually offloaded for supply to other parts of the city, very few trucks from the country now deliver food at the market.

From about 40 trucks in a day to now less than 10 arrive daily due to the restricted movement, a trader said.

Beatrice Macharia, an agronomist with Growth Point, an agro-consultancy, observed that Kenyan farmers have been able to sustain the market amid limited imports due to good rains in the March to May season.

“The rains offered a boost in the production but in the long-term we still need the imports,” she said, adding good prices have cushioned farmer from high cost of inputs.

Kenya’s agriculture secretary Peter Munya on May 20 asked local farmers to use the window brought about constrained supply chains to reap from their ventures by supplying the market.

Kenya food imports topped 1 billion dollars in 2019, according to the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, with the high imports blamed on erratic weather during the period.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Kenyan farmers grapple with oscillating temperatures as climate varies

Published

on

After floods, due to heavy rains, killed at least 285 people and destroyed hundreds of acres of crops between April and May in Kenya, farmers have started to feel another pinch of climate variability.

Night and day-time temperatures in different parts of the east African nation are oscillating between too high and too low, affecting crop production.

Areas that are worst-hit include those around the capital Nairobi and in the neighbouring central and eastern regions, where most food consumed in the city is grown.

Data from the meteorological department shows that temperatures in Nairobi and surrounding areas are currently rising to a high of 27 degrees Celsius during the day and falling at night to 14 degrees Celsius, from day temperature average of 24 degrees Celsius and night 20 degrees Celsius in the past.

The fluctuation in temperatures is hurting crops, with horticultural and coffee farmers feeling much of the heat.

For tomato farmers, especially those growing the crop in the field, the cold temperatures at night have given rise to an increase in blight disease, which is destroying plants and fruits.

The increase in disease means that farmers have to spend more money on chemicals and spraying the crops pushing up the cost of production.

“Blight has become a major problem currently, especially among farmers growing tomatoes, strawberries, capsicum, chilli, potatoes and cucumbers.

The cold weather disease is attacking crops and farmers have been forced to dig deeper into their pockets to take curative measures,’’ said Beatrice Macharia of Growth Point, an agro-consultancy in Kajiado County, south of Nairobi.

The county is one of the biggest sources of food for the capital Nairobi, with most of the farmers growing crops under irrigation.

“Blight attacks leaves forming circular brown lesions and they then turn yellow and fall off.

For tomatoes, the fruits have brown marks and the inside becomes watery as they shrink,’’ she said, noting that most of the inquiries she is currently receiving are virtually about the disease.

Macharia observed that one has to spray crops like potatoes, coffee, tomatoes, eggplant and capsicum with chemicals at least twice every week when the temperatures are too low lest they die due to bacterial blight.

In the past, a cold weather would set in the east African nation in July and end in August, but for the last two years, climate variability has seen the chilly spell start in May and last over two months, giving farmers a hard time.

Chicken, goats and cattle farmers also have to contend with the cold spell that leads to rise in coccidiosis and pneumonia, which affects livestock.

Cold weather normally leads to increased cost of production because a farmer has to rely on supplemental heat, which can be from electricity or charcoal to keep the birds warmer.

Macharia noted that the variation of climate is making farming a little harder as animals and crops struggle to adjust to the infrequent weather patterns that oscillate from heavy rains, dry spell and a colder period in just a few months.

AIB

Edited By: Abdulfatah Babatunde (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Roundup: Kenyan businesses pick up as normalcy returning amid anti-COVID-19 measures

Published

on

By

Small and medium-sized businesses in Kenya are registering a steady surge in activities as business picks up in the east African nation amid observation of COVID-19 containment measures.

Business is resuming as some companies that had sent their workers on leave following the outbreak of the disease in March allow them back.

Similarly, a number of people who had chosen to stay at home to enforce social distancing are resuming work as they observe measures to curb the spread of the disease.

Some of the businesses, particularly in the Nairobi city center that are registering uptick of activities, include commuter vehicles known as matatus, salons and barber shops, chemists, clothes and shoes shops, and hotels and eateries.

Banks and supermarkets, which though did not close down but had witnessed reduced activities in the last two months as people stayed away, are also registering a surge in the number of customers.

The steady resurgence in business portends bright prospects for the small and medium-sized enterprises as the east African nation battles the disease.

“We are happy that at least business is picking up,” said Andrew Mutie, who sells women shoes and clothes in central business in Nairobi.

“Most of my customers started to return to work a week ago and I am now getting orders for clothes, shoes and bags, not as it was the case for the last two months,” he added.

The return of workers in the city center has also come as a boon for hundreds of matatu operators who had been greatly affected by the stay at home measure.

Some of the matatu operators had grounded their vehicles due to low number of commuters moving from the residential areas to the city center and vice versa.

The government in March directed the commuter buses to carry half the capacity of the vehicles for passengers to maintain social distancing.

While the matatus tried to compensate the loss of income by raising the fare, low number of commuters worsened the situation.

“More people are coming to the city center which assures us business both in the morning, during the day and the evening. Though the curfew time is affecting business, things are improving,” said Geoffrey Muriuki, a conductor with Rembo Shuttle on the Kitengela-Nairobi route.

A survey in the capital Nairobi on Thursday indicated that the number of people visiting various businesses is on the rise, with hotels and eateries, banks and supermarkets being among the top beneficiaries of the resurgence.

At an eatery on Kimathi Street in the central business district of Nairobi, several customers sat at different tables observing social distancing as they ate their food.

The facility, like some others in Nairobi, started in-service over a week ago after testing all its workers for COVID-19 as directed by the government.

“People are coming back, especially this week, there has been good traffic but we have to maintain social distance,” said Jane, a waiter at the outlet.

Ernest Manuyo, a lecturer at Pioneer Institute in Nairobi, noted that people are resuming activities as they observe containment measures as reality dawns that they must learn to live with the virus around.

President Uhuru Kenyatta has hinted at reopening the economy from next month when the period of the current dusk to dawn curfew ends.

Central Bank of Kenya governor Patrick Njoroge observed that he expects resumption of normalcy in various sectors from June.

“Cessations of some restrictions especially in sectors like hospitality have helped boost business and we expect next month business to surge further. Small businesses are the backbone of the economy, so it is a good thing if activities resume,” he said.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also