Connect with us

Science & Technology

NACETEM signs MoU with NBS on research methodology, data analysis

Published

on

 

 

 

The National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM)

has signed an Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS)

on research methodology and data analysis for national development.

The MoU followed Stakeholders’ Workshop on Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators Survey

for Nigeria and Technology Audit of Selected Economic Sectors organised by NACETEM in Abuja.

Signed by NACETEM Director-General, Prof. Okechukwu Ukwuoma for the technology management office and

Dr Yemi Kale, Statistician General for NBS, the MoU aimed to further help the agency to accomplish its

mandates, as it concerned the design and delivery of training programmes in the area of research methodology.

Others are survey development, data gathering, analysis, and application for policy makers and officers in

Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) for socio-economic development in the country.

The MoU would further the exchange of ideas, concepts, training manuals and brochure for parties to incorporate relevant

framework in the short-term training programmes.

It is also to share sampling frame, data and knowledge for research and training purposes; to review, ensure quality control

and endorse existing NACETEM survey instruments and statistical reports, adopt such as part of official national statistics

and initiate the process of integrating technology management into the National Consultative Committee on Statistics (NCCS).

“This collaboration shows the commitment of NACETEM to ensuring that all-inclusive approach was adopted in carrying

out its activities, particularly in the development of Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) indicators for the nation.

The MoU will assist in policy research projects which help to remove guesswork from governance and its consultancy

activities, as no dynamic organisation can operate in isolation.’’

The NACETEM workshop, expected to evolve STI indicators for the nation, was held from May 13 to May 17 in Abuja, and

had stakeholders and policy makers in key sectors of the economy in attendance.

The workshop was also to audit the nation’s current state in research and development, science and technology and benchmark

against targets for focus on science, technology and innovation management for sustainable development.

NACETEM is an agency under Federal Ministry of Science and Technology, saddled with the responsibility of

providing critical knowledge support in the area of science, technology and innovation management for sustainable development.

Edited by Hadiza Mohammed-Aliyu

Science & Technology

NACETEM boss solicits stakeholders’ support to advance STI indicators

Published

on

The National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM) has called for more support from stakeholders to achieve efforts aimed at advancing Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) indicators.

NACETEM’s Director-General, Prof. Okechukwu Ukwuoma, made the call on Tuesday in a Memorandum presented by the centre at the ongoing 17th National Council on Science and Technology, holding in Awka, Anambra  from Nov. 25 to 29.

Represented by Dr Ayobami Oyewale, Head, Science, Policy and Innovation Studies department of the centre, the director-general said NACETEM had the mandate to provide knowledge support and sound policy advice for STI systems in the country.

He, however, stressed the centre needed more funding to make  accomplish its capacity building and research development and STI indicators initiated in 2005.

He said that NACETEM conceived the project on the STI Indicators for Nigeria in 2005 to serve as the basis for assisting the three tiers governments and serve as the basis for assisting various levels of government in STI policy formulation and strategies.

Ukwuoma also said that the project was intended to engender development similar to macro-economic indicators handled by the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN).

 

“The project should be conducted regularly in order to have up-to-date STI indicators that will propel the country’s development, in line with the global best practices.

“The first two sets of indicators were published in the African Union- New Economic Partnership for African Development (AU-NEPAD) innovation outlook of 2011 and 2014,“ he said.

He the publication of the indicators could not be carried out in 2017 due to non release of budgetary provisions for NACETEM for the survey.

“NACETEM strongly requests the council’s backing for the continuous conduct of the STI indicators survey on a regular basis in line with the best global practices.

“This will ensure that we know where we are as a nation in our STI efforts.’’

He decried that the agency’s lack of funds for policy research projects, running of short-term courses for selected policy makers free of charge, developmental projects and physical projects.

According to him, NACETEM engages in policy-oriented researches on topical issues for public use which serves as empirical basis for the agency to generate policies coming from such studies.

He further said that project outcome was published as monographs while assessment of the capability and potential of the Ministry of Science and Technology and its agencies was ongoing.

“Technology Audit of Nigeria and Global Technology trends of possible strategic interest to the nation and assessment of Female Acquisition of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in Nigeria is also going on.’’

He urged the Council to mandate members of staff of Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs), at all levels, to take up Postgraduate Diploma courses on Management Technology.

According to the director-general, the courses are being run by NACETEM in collaboration with the Federal University of Technology, Minna, Niger.

He said the programme would enhance the capacity of such staff and ensure better STI knowledge for sustainable grass roots development in the country.

“We also pray that before any official is appointed a Director in the Ministry, he or she should have a Postgraduate Diploma in Technology Management from NACETEM.

“Every newly appointed Director-General should be mandated to come to NACETEM to train on Technology Management.

“NACETEM fervently seeks the council’s support in ensuring that the outcomes of our various policy research projects are utilised by all tiers of government in policy formulation and governance.

“NACETEM observes that there still exists an ineffective interaction amongst the elements of the National Innovation System and this should be strengthened with adequate government intervention via policy direction.’’

Ukwuoma emphasised that the agency had engaged in capacity building aimed at encouraging state governments to get involved in the development of STI across the country.

According to him, NACETEM has six fully functional zonal offices in the Southwest (Lagos), North-Central (Abuja), South-South (Bayelsa), North-West (Kano), South-East Office (Enugu) and North-East office (Yola).

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

NACETEM boss harps on importance of technology management for job creation

Published

on

Prof. Okechukwu Ukwuoma, Director-General, National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM) has emphasised the importance of technology management in unlocking job opportunities in the country.

Ukwuoma said this at the opening of a workshop on, “Unlocking Potentials and Exploiting Opportunities for Wealth and Job Creation at the Grassroots: Technology Management Imperative on Tuesday at Akure, Ondo State.

 

In a statement by Mr Isaac Oluyi, the Public Relations Officer for NACETEM in Abuja, Ukwuoma said technology could be used to trigger massive wealth and job creation opportunities for Nigerians at the grassroots.

 

“One may see opportunity without recognising it, if the person has not been trained in the art of unmasking opportunities.

 

“ The country is blessed with a lot of potential – human and material, we are yet to live up to those potentialities.

 

“The time to take our rightful place, amidst the comity of nations, has come and the needful must be done to make this a reality.

 

“One of such actions to be taken is continuous building of capacities of our people in relevant areas to exploit opportunities for wealth and job creation, knowledge of technology management is essential,’’ he said.

According to him, technology management knowledge will not only help to identify key areas of the economy to take advantage of, but also help to identify what technology to deploy for optimal results.

 

“In the course of this workshop, participants will be challenged to think outside the box and be adequately prepared   to see and maximise the untapped opportunities at the grassroots.

 

“The workshop will also open participants’ eyes to hitherto neglected or untapped opportunities, as issues pertaining to identification of opportunities, opportunity analysis and opportunities maximisation will be shed light.’’

 

Ukwuoma described the workshop as timely to enable the participants acquire knowledge that would help them contribute to the economy.

 

“Without doubt, Nigeria is blessed with a lot of natural resources, capable of making the country one of the best economically viable nations of the world. Resources alone, however, don’t make nations any longer.

 

“The world is changing. In fact, the dynamics of what makes nations to develop and grow have since changed. It is no longer resource-based, but completely knowledge-based.

 

“This goes to show that you may have resources and still be poor, if you don’t know how to drive them with cutting edge knowledge.“

 

According to him, the workshop is organised in conjunction with John Kollins Institute to trigger massive wealth and job creation opportunities for Nigerians at the grassroots.

CIA/DUA

Edited by Dada Ahmed

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

NACETEM identifies barriers to innovation in Nigeria

Published

on

National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM) has identified lack of technology information and qualified personnel as top innovation barriers for Nigerian firms.

This is contained in a report made available to Nigeria News Agency by the Centre in Abuja.

NACETEM is an agency of Nigeria’s Federal Ministry of Science and Technology that provides critical knowledge support in the area of Science, Technology, Innovation (STI) management for sustainable development.

Dr Abiodun Egbetokun, Assistant Director of Research in NACETEM said the report was based on a survey jointly carried out by NACETEM and Centre for Innovation Indicators (CesTII).

CeSTII is South Africa’s policy research institute which performs national studies on R&D and innovation on behalf of the Department of Higher Education, Science and Technology.

Egbetokun said the survey, done at the South Africa’s Human Sciences Research Council in Pretoria, South Africa, reviewed the innovation performances of the two countries.

Egbetokun said uncertain demand, difficulty in finding cooperation partners were other challenges facing the firms.

He said the starting point to improving on the innovation challenges was to understand the nature of the problems in manufacturing and service firms.

“Our comparison tells us that funding-related issues are crucial in both Nigeria and South Africa in manufacturing and services alike.

“But, with such old data that we have in Nigeria, for instance, it is difficult to design the right interventions because what the data tells us may already be yesterday’s story.

“So, we need to be more serious about data collection and curation.

“This is one aspect where, with the right amount of resources, NACETEM is well positioned to deliver the goods,’’ he said.

He recalled that Data for the survey was drawn from the South African Business Innovation Survey (2008) and from the Nigerian Business Innovation Survey (2010).

“Both surveys were conducted using the OECD’s Oslo Manual, allowing for international comparability of data. GDP data was sourced from Statistics South Africa and Nigeria’s National Bureau of Statistics”.

Egbetokun said some innovation challenges were time-invariant, citing lack of funding as an example.

He said, “innovation is a costly affair, mostly because it is risky and no firm can precisely tell a prior whether it will succeed or fail.

“This remains true irrespective of how old the data that indicates that problem is.

” What needs to be done in this case is for government to underwrite some of the risks involved in innovation.’’

He recalled how most of the technologies underlying the iPhone were the results of heavy government investment in research and development.

“In effect, what Apple simply did was to couple these results into a new product.

“This is what the innovation economics call recombinant novelty. Such things cannot and do not occur where firms have to bear all the financial risks themselves.

Egbetokun said innovation thrives where there are redundancies – that is, slack resources that could be diverted into innovative efforts.

“That is why companies like Google allow employees to take up to 20 per cent of their paid work time off to work on personal projects,’’ he said.

Egbetokun said Gmail, for instance, came out of such redundancy.

“In Nigeria, firms have to struggle to provide their own electricity, water, security, haulage, etc.

“By the time they are done with all of these, they barely have any resources left to do much beyond their usual production runs.

“Moreover, our bureaucracy is a killer; from multiple taxation to lack of protection for strategic sectors. One can count several areas where simple interventions can make a lot of difference.

“Government simply needs to wake up to its responsibilities – it’s that simple,’’ he said.

In addition, he said it would take the country many years of intentional efforts to come out of dependence on importation of technology.

“We should start talking seriously about how to move from where we are to where we need to be by developing our local innovation.

“An innovative economy is not cheap but that does not mean it is unattainable; we only have to be willing to develop the requisite resources for it, beginning with a deliberate effort towards an educated citizenry.

“Today, we have too many children out of school, and too few of those in school learning any skill relevant to our development challenges in this century.

“How can we possibly become an innovative country like that?

“So, in addition to providing the kind of interventions, already highlighted above, we need to be more aggressive in human capital development,’’ he said.

NAN reports that NACETEM and CeSTII are responsible for the production of science, technology and innovation indicators.

The research carried out, focused on how the productive sector of the economy fared, particularly in relation to the creation and application of knowledge.(NAN)

CIA/

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

Nigeria, dumping ground for obsolete technologies – NACETEM

Published

on

Nigeria has become recipient of obsolete and misfit technologies, a research carried out by the National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM) reveals.
NACETEM is an agency of Nigeria’s Federal Ministry of Science and Technology that provides critical knowledge support in the area of Science, Technology, Innovation (STI) management for sustainable development.
In a report made available to the Nigeria News Agency in Abuja, the centre said the development was due to reliance of the country’s manufacturing and service firms on imported technologies.
Speaking to NAN on the issue, Dr Abiodun Egbetokun, Assistant Director of Research in NACETEM said a survey was jointly carried out by NACETEM and Centre for Innovation Indicators (CesTII) at the South Africa’s Human Sciences Research Council.
He said the research focused on the innovation performances of Nigeria and South Africa and how the productive sector of the economies of both countries fare particularly in relation to the creation and application of knowledge.
He said findings revealed that both countries use technology acquisition as the key innovation strategy but South Africa used more technology in the manufacturing sector than Nigeria.
“We compared innovation in manufacturing between both countries; we found a slightly higher rate of innovation in South Africa than in Nigeria.
“But, firms in both countries rely on technology acquisition (that is, the purchase of embodied technology through machinery, equipment and software) to innovate.
“In the specific case of Nigeria, most of the technology is imported.
“In the comparison of service firms, the difference in innovation rates between both countries is not noticeable.
“While Nigerian service firms still rely on technology imports, South African firms emphasise staff training as the main innovation strategy,’’ he said.
The director said both countries used technology acquisition as key innovation strategy to improve the quantity and quality of their value propositions.
He noted that the two countries faced critical financial and other barriers to innovation.
On services sector, the official said the two countries used training and technology acquisition as key innovation strategies to improve the quantity and quality of their proposition.
According to him, the findings of the research show that the Gross Domestic Products (GDPs)of the two countries were stalled in recent years.
The director said there were several reasons why GDP growth rates could be stalled but the most plausible in the case of both Nigeria and South Africa is what economists term “middle income trap”.
“This happens when a country grows rapidly and attains middle income status (according to World Bank classification) but is unable to grow beyond that status.
“Often, what drives the pre-middle-income growth is connected to specific advantages that the country has, for instance in the export market for primary commodities (in the case of Nigeria, crude oil, and in South Africa, gold).
“Due to local wage increases that accompany middle income status, the country tends to become less competitive in the export market and is, at the same time, unable to compete with more advanced countries in the market for finished goods.
“That is the story of Nigeria and South Africa.
“Currently, both countries grapple with poor domestic labour market conditions, evidenced by incessant wage increases, worker protests, large share of workforce in indecent employment, etc among other characteristic middle income trap problems,’’ he said.
Egbetokun said data from the research was drawn from the South Africa Business Innovation survey (2008) and the Nigerian Business Innovation Survey (2010)
“These are the latest available data. The surveys stopped since then because funding of the NEPAD African Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators Initiative (ASTII) stopped and each country needed to fund its own innovation surveys.
“Unfortunately, NACETEM did not receive funding for the surveys from the Nigerian government until in the 2018 budget year.
“We are now embarking on the data collection process for another round, but any analysis for now will have to rely on the old 2008-2010 data.
“For comparability, we chose 2010-2012 data for South Africa. Other years would have been too far apart between both countries,’’ the director said.
According to him, an innovation survey is normally conducted periodically (typically once every three years) to assess how the productive sector of an economy fares, particularly in relation to the creation and application of knowledge.
“These surveys are useful because they help to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the industrial sector in a country, with a view to designing appropriate policies and structures to initiate and sustain growth.
“Innovation surveys have been carried out in Europe, where they are commonly known as Community Innovation Surveys (CIS), since 1991/92.
“ In 1996, South Africa was the first African country to implement an innovation survey.’’
NAN reports that the recent research emerges from Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for joint research and training that NACETEM signed with CeSTII in 2017. (NAN)
CIA/ROT

Edited by Rotimi Ijikanmi

Money grows on tree of persistency

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

NACETEM DG says domestication of science, technology will boost ERGP

Published

on

Prof. Okechukwu Ukwuoma, Director-General, National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM), says the National Economic Recovery and Growth Plan (ERGP) can be achieved through the domestication of science, technology and innovation (STI) in projects execution.

Ukwuoma made this assertion in a statement by the agency’s Public Relations Officer, Mr Isaac Oluyi, on Wednesday in Asaba, at the ongoing two-day National Technology Management Forum.

The News Agency of Nigeria reports that ERGP, 2017-2020, envisages that by 2020, Nigeria would have made significant progress towards achieving structural economic change with a more diversified and inclusive economy.

Ukwuoma said ERGP could only be successfully achieved if driven by domestication of STI in all phases of project conceptualisation, design, procurement, contract and implementation.

“The ERGP remains pivotal to the national development plan of the Federal Government of Nigeria.

 

“Although a medium term plan, the ERGP has sustainable long term objectives of stabilising the macro-economic environment, achieve agriculture and food security and ensure energy sufficiency (power and petroleum products).

 

“Parts of the objectives are also to improve transportation infrastructure and drive industrialisation by focusing on micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs)

 

“It is apt to realise that the goals of the ERGP can only be successfully achieved through STI in all phases of projects implementation.

 

“This realisation necessitated the introduction of the Presidential Executive Order No. 5 by President Muhammadu Buhari in February, 2018,’’ he said.

 

The director-general said it was necessary for the drivers of such initiatives to ensure that stakeholders in science, technology and innovation were conversant with the initiatives and how to use them to achieve sustainable development.

 

He said the thrust of the Executive Order No. 5 was the promotion of Nigerian content in the planning and execution of contracts and projects in science, engineering and technology.

 

Ukwuoma added that it was the Federal Government’s decision to encourage and deepen the participation of indigenous professionals in the execution of science, technology and innovation projects and contract.

 

He said that the order further sought to entrench science, technology and innovation culture in achieving the nation’s development goals.

 

“It aims to do this by encouraging and promoting ‘Made in Nigeria’ goods and services, with the ultimate objective adopting local technology in as gradual process to replace foreign ones.

 

“The Executive Order No. 5 succinctly and adequately provides for the modalities, processes and dynamics required for meeting its set objectives.

 

“NACETEM believes that there is the need for constructive engagement with relevant stakeholders in government, industry and academia to harmonise roles toward ensuring the Order is implemented to make the impact on the nation’s economy.

 

 

According to him, ERGP and Executive Order 5 remain pivotal to the nation’s development.

 

Ukwuoma said that the President Buhari-led administration had laid a solid foundation for science, technology and innovation to thrive.

 

“A lot of novel and commendable initiatives that would make science, technology and innovation a useful tool for development came up and such initiatives are still driving us in the direction the nation is heading to,’’ he said.

 

In her remarks, Mrs Maryann Onyejekwe, Coordinator, NACETEM, Southwest Office, said the event was strategically designed to sensitise stakeholders on their individual or collective roles in deepening Nigerian content in contracts, science, engineering and technology.

 

Onyejekwe said the event would foster synergies among stakeholders to strengthen and promote Nigerian content in contracts, science, engineering and technology.

 

“It will also promote ease of doing business and patronages for ‘Made in Nigeria’ goods and services,’’ the official said.

 

In addition, she said that the event brought to bear the import of Executive Order No. 5 on the trajectories of ‘Made in Nigeria’ goods and services for local technological capability and innovation.

 

“In essence, we are here to see how we can maximise what we have in the area of science, technology and innovation to achieve sustainable development,’’ Onyejekwe said.

 

NAN reports that the forum was organised to discuss the Presidential Executive Order 5, the implications for technological development and national industrial competitiveness, ways of deepening and promoting local content in the sector.

 

Participants at the forum included Permanent Secretaries, Director-General and Directors of federal and state cognate science, technology and innovation ministries, departments and agencies.

 

Others were top executives of development financial institutions, the organised private sector, National and State Chambers of Commerce and Industry, professional and trade associations, tertiary institutions, captains of industry, local contractors, artisans and professionals.

 

NAN also reports that NACETEM, an agency under the Federal Ministry of Science and Technology, is charged with the responsibility of providing critical knowledge support in the area of science, technology and innovation management for sustainable development.

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

NACETEM stresses need for practical knowledge, skills in STI projects

Published

on

Prof. Okechukwu Ukwuoma, the Director General, National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM) has stressed the need for practical solutions to address knowledge and skill gaps in Science, Technology and Innovation-based projects.

He said this in an address at a National Workshop on Management of Science, Technology and Innovation Projects on Monday in Yenagoa.

The information is in a statement by Mr Isaac Oluyi, the Public Relations Officer of NACETEM in Abuja.

He noted that the NACETEM boss specifically said the workshop was designed to enhance the skills of professionals in science and technology sector.

He quoted Ukwuoma as saying “the workshop seeks to develop concrete and practicable solutions to address knowledge and skill gaps in managing Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) based projects across the various economic sectors in Nigeria.

“We have in our midst, professionals such as Project Managers, Engineers, Quantity Surveyors, Builders, among others, and that the array of professionals here are from both the private and public sectors.

“The cheering news is that NACETEM is ready to expose us to the global best practices in managing science, technology and innovation based projects via this workshop.

“Essentially, participants will learn Project Management skills and will be acquainted with Project Management tools that will come in handy in managing STI based projects.’’

The managing director said the administration of President Muhammad Buhari placed premium on science, technology and innovation as driver of the country’s economy.

He said the significance attached to science and technology was evident in the kind of support the administration extended to Federal Ministry of Science and Technology and its agencies.

According to him, it is with this backing that NACETEM as an agency of the ministry reaches out to all and sundry, particularly in the area of capacity building.

“So, this workshop is one of the novel ways the agency is ensuring that no stone is left unturned in making science, technology and innovation a veritable tool of sustainable development.

“NACETEM often comes up with cutting edge knowledge that not only repositions participating organisations at its training programmes, but also ensures that they are given adequate follow ups in the proper deployment of knowledge acquired.

“We are open to consulting for as many organisations as would require our services in science, technology and innovation management for sustainable development across the six geopolitical zones of the country as we are everywhere.”

Ukwuoma, therefore, enjoined the participants at the workshop to take full advantage of the event to forge a synergy that would help realise the objectives of the workshop.

The agency also recently organised a workshop on “Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators Survey and

Technology Audit of Selected Economic Sectors” held between May 13 and May 17 in Abuja.

The workshop was to measure Nigeria’s R&D performance and put quantifiable, empirical evidence as a country

and monitor progress so that the country could plan better.

It was also to develop indicators for the country to know its current state of research and development, science and technology and also be able to benchmark targets.

The auditing aspect was to help the country to know the challenges it had in R&D, gaps, as well as promote indigenous technologies and know the existing barriers.

NACETEM is an agency of Federal Ministry of Science and Technology, responsible for providing critical knowledge support in the area of science, technology and innovation management for sustainable development.

Edited by Hadiza Mohammed-Aliyu

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

NACETEM, NIPSS sign MoU on joint research, capacity building

Published

on

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MoU

Abuja, June 10, 2019 National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM) and National Institute of Policy and

Strategic Studies (NIPSS) on Monday signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to facilitate coordination and cooperation on

joint policy research and capacity building.

The MoU followed an event on Nigeria’s Science, Technology and Innovation Policy and Socio-Economic Development during

the 41st Senior Executive Course of NIPSS in Jos.

The MoU, which was signed by NACETEM Director-General, Prof. Okechukwu Ukwuoma and Director-General of

NIPSS, Mr Jonathan Juma, was also to render consultancy services for stakeholders advocacy programmes.

It was also for jointly designed and delivered programmes, seminars and conferences toward solving national challenges.

The MoU would further facilitate development of human capacity through exchange of programmes between both organisations, among other

methods.

While signing the MoU, the NIPSS boss said: “the MOU will become effective before the end of 2019, as there is no need entering into

agreement that will not worl.”

On his part, Ukwuoma appreciated the management of NIPSS and expressed the readiness of NACETEM to ensure that the MoU

achieved sustainable development in the country.

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

Science, technology and innovation needed to evolve modern economy — DG NACETEM

Published

on

Science

Abuja, June 10, 2019 Prof. Okechukwu Ukwuoma, the Director General, National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM)

says Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) are necessary to evolve a modern economy.

He said this during paper presentation at National Institute of Policy and Strategic Studies (NIPSS) 41st Senior Executive Course with

the theme “Funding Universal Healthcare Coverage in Nigeria’’ on Monday in Jos.

He said that the Nigerian STI Policy of 2012 which was currently undergoing review, was aimed at creating an independent, integrated and

self-sustaining economy while giving prominence to issues of coordination, funding and collaboration.

He added that “presently, this policy differs from other extant policy because its general objective is to build a strong Science, Technology

and Innovation capability and capacity needed to evolve a modern economy.

“It also facilitates the acquisition of knowledge to adapt, utilise, replicate and diffuse technologies for the growth of Small and Medium-Scale Enterprises (SMEs)

agricultural development, food security, power generation and poverty reduction.

“Furthermore, the Nigerian STI policy supports the establishment and strengthening of organisations, institutions and structures for effective

coordination and management of activities within a virile National Innovation System (NIS).

“The policy will also encourage the creation of innovative enterprises, utilising Nigeria’s indigenous knowledge and technology to produce marketable

goods and services.

“As presently structured, the policy has not sufficiently addressed the weak linkages in the NIS or exploit fully the opportunities of emerging

technologies such as Biotechnology, ICT and Nanotechnology in solving societal challenges.”

He, however, said there were agencies under the Federal Ministry of Science and Technology in Nigeria working to bridge this weaknesses and enhance the policy.

Okwuoma mentioned some selected efforts of Nigeria’s STI policy to socio-economic development to include Federal Ministry of Science and

Technology’s (FMST) committee on Blue Print for Commercialisation of R&D in Nigeria.

According to him, this is with a view to ensuring that research findings remain important and relevant to the needs of Nigerians and that it should be market-driven for national development.

He added that in September 2017, the FMST, through one of its agencies, Federal Institute for Industrial Research (FIIRO), signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with three

indigenous companies- Tiger Foods Limited, LenofKonsult, and Lashone Links Limited.

He explained that the MoU was for commercialisation of indigenous research breakthroughs on food production technologies such as food seasoning,

ready-to-use traditional soups, dairy, soyabean, cassava processing technologies.

He noted that beyond commercialisation of these R&D breakthroughs, the MoU was to also

to help in creating awareness for the promotion and utilisation of indigenous R&D breakthroughs among Nigerians to gain their acceptability and patronage.

The Raw Material Research Development Council (RMRDC), an agency of FMST, was equally charged to develop appropriate technology commercialisation

framework to transfer existing research outputs from knowledge centres to the industry, he said.

The NACETEM boss also said that the agency was working toward developing competitive clusters for raw materials development in the country to conserve

foreign earnings since the Federal Executive Council (FEC) approved RMRDC National Strategy Document in 2016, among other efforts.

On challenges to successful implementation of STI policy, which had been attributed to weak government structures, inadequate technological infrastructure,

the director general said there had not been much of the desired gain from the policy formulation.

As a result, he said, government was making efforts to address challenges to, among other objectives, ensure that “the policy was able to reduce and eventually

eliminate the current high level of `stand-alone’ research efforts scattered all over the country.


captures all challenges and knowledge gaps that limited full implementation of the existing policy.

“The problem of getting support from the National Assembly will also be addressed to achieve the aim of creating effective mechanisms to promote,

commercialise and diffuse local technologies for industrial development,’’ Okwuoma said.

News Agency of Nigeria reports that participants at the event were drawn from Nigeria Army, Nigeria Police Force, Nigeria Labour Congress,

Central Bank of Nigeria, universities and the Presidency.

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

NACETEM, NOTAP collaborate to address issues on intellectual property

Published

on

National Centre for Technology Management (NACETEM) and National Office for Technology Acquisition

and Promotion (NOTAP) are set to collaborate to address issues on intellectual property in the course of implementing projects.

This is one of the decisions reached at the end of a three-day workshop on “Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators Survey and

Technology Audit of Selected Economic Sectors” held between May 13 and May 17 in Abuja.

The decisions are in a communique issued by Mr Isaac Oluyi , the Head of Public Relations Office of NACETEM to News Agency of Nigeria

on Thursday in Abuja.

According to the communique, all issues pertaining to intellectual property, including patents, trademarks, technology licensing, are

to be handled by both agencies in the course of implementing projects.

It added that stakeholders noted that Research and Development (R&D) commercialisation in Nigeria was still challenging, and

therefore, agreed that plausible solutions be encouraged through NACETEM, in collaboration with other organisations.

In line with this, it was also agreed that Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), Agricultural Research Council of Nigeria (ARCN),

NOTAP, Raw Material Research Development Council (RMRDC) and the private sector practitioners should collaborate.

Other decisions were that the last set of STI Indicators from NACETEM were not properly publicised and therefore the results from

the workshop should be well publicised.

On projects’ implementation, the private sector should be encouraged to contribute significantly to funding of R&D in Nigeria.

NACETEM should also collaborate with National Universities Commission (NUC) and ARCN for the success of this project.

Much of government-funded R&D in Nigeria was not covered, including Petroleum Technology Development Fund (PTDF)-sponsored postgraduate research

studies abroad, self-sponsored PhDs research.

It was, therefore, agreed that provisions be made in questionnaire to ensure they were not exempted to provide holistic view of the status of R&D in the country.

On questionnaire design and administration, enumerators should be able to clearly explain the purpose of the survey to selected firms and institutions.

Each section of the questionnaire should begin with brief explanation on the information or data being requested.

When there are structured responses in the questionnaire, provision should be made for respondents to give more options other than the ones stated in the questionnaire.

In the section on barriers to innovation in the questionnaire, there should be questions to elicit information on organisational culture, as it can be a big factor on a

firm’s innovativeness.

The option of administering questionnaires electronically by email should be considered by NACETEM.

“NACETEM should consider reaching out to firms for data collection through associations and regulatory bodies such as

Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Chambers of Commerce and Industry, etc.

“Meanwhile the Federal Inland Revenue Service (FIRS) should be approached to provide information on selected firms’ turnover

and R&D expenditure.

“National Planning Commission (NPC) should be approached to collect data on Non-governmental Organisations.”

The stakeholders noted that companies that had yet to be incorporated might not be willing to disclose their financial information,

especially their annual turnover, therefore NACETEM should consider giving a range of figures for them to select.

NACETEM should assure firms of the confidentiality of the information provided and ensure that the information was

utilised for national planning and policy making processes only and not for any other purposes.

More awareness and sensitisation should be created on the two projects for the surveys to be a success.

On Technology Audit, which was part of the workshop, the stakeholders said database was key, noting that

“there is the need for the nation to know what is available, what type of technologies we need, and what needs to be updated.

There is also the need to develop technology monitoring systems.

triple helix model or the Government-Industry-Academy model which is aimed at commercialisation of R&D.

“School curriculum should be upgraded to reflect new realities in terms of Nigeria’s technology needs and develop systems

for nurturing talents and provision of adequate reward systems.”

NACETEM is an agency of Federal Ministry of Science and Technology, responsible for providing critical knowledge support

in the area of science, technology and innovation management for sustainable development.

The recent NACETEM workshop was to measure Nigeria’s R&D performance and put quantifiable, empirical evidence as a country

and monitor progress so that the country could plan better.

It was also to develop indicators for the country to know its current state of research and development, science and technology

and also be able to benchmark targets.

The auditing aspect was to help the country to know the challenges it had in R&D, gaps, as well as promote indigenous technologies

and know the existing barriers.”

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also