Connect with us

Foreign

Nazi hunter Zuroff calls for better education to fight anti-Semitism

Published

on

  A high-profile Israeli Nazi hunter has called for more comprehensive education to battle anti-Semitism, racism and xenophobia, after an attack outside a synagogue in Halle on Wednesday left two dead and two injured.

“We see a rise of right-wing extremism and rise of hate crime all over the world – the long-range solution is education,’’ said Efraim Zuroff, who heads the Jerusalem office of the Simon Wiesenthal Centre.

“There is some education, but it is not being applied as evenly and deeply as it should be,’’ Zuroff told dpa.

“I see some places that do a good job and others that don’t.’’

He noted that this is dependent on individual teachers and principals.

Zuroff also asserted that education on this subject is better in West Germany than in East Germany.

He said that the short-term solution is security and monitoring of social networks.

While praising the security in Germany, he said that lack of proper self-monitoring by social networks is a universal problem.

Referring to the fact that the attacker in Halle filmed and broadcast his actions on social media, Zuroff said “this is absolutely mad – the minute it comes up they have to get to the guy’’.

The video has since been deleted.

The rampage came amid heated public debate about the safety of Jews in Germany, following a string of anti-Semitic crimes in the country.

AIB

Edited by Abdulfatah Babatunde

Babatunde Abdulfatah: is a graduate and a professionally trained journalist, with experience in national news reporting/editing and verification at the News Agency of Nigeria. NNN is a Nigerian online news portal that publishes breaking news in Nigeria, and across the world. Our journalists are honest, fair, accurate, thorough and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting news in the best interest of the public, because truth is the cornerstone of journalism and they strive diligently to ascertain the truth in every news report. Contact: editor[at]nnn.com.ng

Foreign

German court bans permanent police cameras in ‘Nazi hood’

Published

on

Police may not conduct permanent video surveillance in a part of the western German city of Dortmund described as a “Nazi neighbourhood” in order to curb crime, a regional court ruled on Friday.

The Dortmund police had aimed to set up video cameras on a street seen as a stronghold of suspected neo-Nazis from September onward, in order to prevent crime there and in the immediate neighbourhood.

“They had also aimed to counter the image of the Dorstfeld neighbourhood as dominated by Nazis,’’ the court said.

Tenants of a house who are believed to be members of Dortmund’s neo-Nazi scene had sued, claiming that their rights to privacy would be infringed by the planned surveillance directly in front of their home.

The court ruled that the police plans were not covered by the relevant legislation.

“The area was not a crime hotspot, and serious crime could not be expected there,’’ the court said.

The damage cited by the police, including graffiti with Nazi content, did not warrant action of this kind, it found.

In addition, permanent video surveillance represented a serious impingement of basic rights that was disproportionate.

Edited By: Abiodun Oluleye/Ejike Obeta (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Putin, Merkel exchange congratulations on 75th anniversary of Nazi defeat

Published

on

Russian President Vladimir Putin and German Chancellor Angela Merkel exchanged congratulations Friday on the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Europe and the world from Nazism on Saturday.

During a phone conversation, Putin and Merkel emphasized the importance of preserving the historical memory of the tragic events of those years, the Kremlin said in a press release.

“In particular, they expressed confidence that both countries will never forget about the German patriots who selflessly fought against the Nazi regime,” it read.

The leaders said that today Russia and Germany are partners in solving many pressing international problems, and they confirmed their wish to build bilateral relations constructively, according to the Kremlin.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

German court decides against visiting camp in trial of ex-Nazi guard

Published

on

He was 17 or 18 years old at the time.

Prosecutors say he `supported the insidious and cruel killing of mainly Jewish prisoners.’

The former guard’s defence lawyer had asked for the trial to be deferred due to the coronavirus pandemic so as not to jeopardise his client’s life.

The virus can lead to the Covid-19 respiratory disease which has proven particularly deadly for elderly people.

The request has been turned down by the court, according to a court spokesman.

On Tuesday, the defendant wore a face mask and rubber gloves, but complained that he could not breathe well through the mask and was allowed by the presiding judge to remove it, the spokesman said.

The trial is scheduled to continue on April 23.

Á

Edited By: Halima Sheji/Tajudeen Atitebi (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Greek’s treatment of refugees no different than Nazis, says Erdogan

Published

on

Turkish President Recep Erdogan, on Wednesday said Greek’s response to migrants attempting to cross the border is no different from what Nazis did, promising to keep the border gates open for refugees heading to Europe.

“There is no difference between what the Nazis did and those images at the Greek border.

“One can see footage of Greek police firing tear gas at migrants as they attempt to break through the border,” Erdogan said.

Erdogan’s remark was a follow up to a meeting he had with top EU officials in Brussels. However, he was expected to meet the leaders of Germany and France in Istanbul on March 17, to discuss migrants.

He added that four migrants were killed attempting to enter Greece, accusing the EU of ignoring inhumane and barbaric actions by Athens.

Greece, however, denied the allegations.

“Turkey did its part to block the migrant influx to Europe while the EU did not fulfil its commitments as part of a 2016 pact, including sending financial aid and accelerating Ankara’s EU accession talks.

“Turkey will keep its border gates open until the EU meets Ankara’s demands, including freedom of movement, opening of accession chapters, updating the Customs Union deal and financial support.

“The irregular migrant influx toward Europe will not only be limited to Greece but will spread to the entire Mediterranean as the weather gets warmer,” he said.

Edited By: Yahaya Isah/Maharazu Ahmed
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

German police probe youth gang using Nazi symbols, parents ‘shocked’

Published

on

Police are investigating a five-strong group of youths for daubing swastika graffiti, shouting “Sieg Heil” and playing music by right-wing extremist performers, a police spokeswoman said on Thursday in Germany.

At least 18-politically motivated criminal acts are being attributed to the group, whose members are aged between 14 and 17, most of them concerning damage to property.

A search conducted on Wednesday had resulted in the confiscation of digital storage devices, laptops and smart phones, with the evaluation expected to take months, the spokeswoman said.

Around 30 officers took part in searching seven homes and other premises where the gang spent its time, seizing spray cans.

The parents of the youths were reported to be “shocked and appalled” at their children’s alleged behaviour.

The group is alleged to have sprayed a swastika, the SS runes and Sieg Heil – all symbols relating to the 1933-45 Nazi dictatorship – on a school wall.

The symbols are all banned under German law.

The Police in the north-eastern German town of Burg Stargard region have increased patrols and preventive measures.

Edited By: Fatima Sule/Abdulfatah Babatunde

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Pacino turns Nazi hunter in TV series debut for Amazon

Published

on

In a screen career spanning more than five decades, it has taken Al Pacino until now to act in a television series.

He is starring in “Hunters”, a new show for Amazon Prime that is due to be released on Friday.

The series, about a band of Nazi hunters in New York in the 1970s, is inspired by a true story – a “love letter” to the show creator’s late grandmother who survived Holocaust.

“I never did this sort of long 10 episodes. So it’s like doing like, I think, about a 12-hour film because it is about 12 hours of film,” Pacino, who turns 80 in April, told Reuters.

“This is a crazy story, too, by the way … Crazy horror, really scary stuff.

“And also heavy, deep, tragic emotion … it runs the gamut,” said Pacino, who was nominated for Best Supporting Actor at this month’s Academy Awards for his role in “The Irishman”.

Show creator David Weil said he wanted to tell his grandmother’s story, the experiences during the war that she had told him about as a child.

“At such a young age, they felt like the stuff of comic books and superheroes,” he said.

“The onus is now on us, on the next generation, to continue their story and further their story. And so ‘Hunters’ is really a love letter to her.

“It’s this desire to propel her story forward into this next generation and to educate people on what the Holocaust is and what people went through so that we can try and prevent this from ever happening again.”

Edited By: Emmanuel Okara/Ali Baba-Inuwa

 

Continue Reading

General news

Memorial to Nazi massacre victims in turmoil after director ousted

Published

on

The work of a memorial site in Lidice, the site of a World War II massacre in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia, has become cloaked in controversy following the ouster of director Martina Lehmannova.

After the head of the Lidice Memorial in the modern day Czech Republic was forced to resign, 10 department heads and curators voiced their support for her, a spokesman for the group said on Friday.

In an open letter, the employees criticised growing pressure from Czech Culture Minister Lubomir Zaoralek and the controversial, communist dominated Czech Freedom Fighters’ Union (CSBS).

The workers warned that independent academic research was under threat.

Lidice was the site of a brutal Nazi massacre in World War II.

German soldiers razed the Central Bohemian village on the morning of June 10, 1942, in revenge for the assassination of a senior SS officer.

One hundred and seventy-three men were killed on the spot and 26 were killed later.

Women and children from the village were sent to concentration camps.

In a documentary broadcast by the Czech Republic’s CT television channel, a historian claimed that a Jewish woman from Lidice was sent to Auschwitz and killed after being betrayed by her landlady.

Lehmannova had called for the Jewish woman to also be commemorated at the memorial site. Some of the Lidice survivors were appalled by the idea, while others supported the move.

Around 150,000 people visited the Lidice Memorial near Prague last year, including many school children.

Edited By: Halima Sheji/Isaac Aregbesola

Continue Reading

Foreign

Putin condemns EU stance on Nazi-Soviet WWII pact as ‘shameless lie’

Published

on

Russian President Vladimir Putin called the EU stance against the World War II-era Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact a “shameless lie” on Wednesday.

The EU adopted a resolution two months ago stating that the 1939 non-aggression pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, named after the diplomats who signed it in Moscow, “paved the way for the outbreak of World War II.”

Russia has preserved the Soviet position that the pact was a necessary evil to prevent the Nazi offensive into the Soviet Union – which nevertheless came two years after the signing, when Nazi Germany attacked the Soviet Union in 1941.

Speaking to officials organising festivities for the 75th anniversary of the war’s end, Putin said the EU’s position is “not based on anything real,” according to a Kremlin transcript.

The Nazi-Soviet pact is rarely discussed in today’s Russia, whereas the Allied – and particularly Soviet – victory over Nazi Germany, ending the war in Europe, remains a much celebrated source of national pride.

The EU resolution said the pact set out to divide Europe “between the two totalitarian regimes” of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.

Historians say that Soviet leader Josef Stalin used the pact as an opportunity to annex territories that, before the 1917 communist revolution, had belonged to the Russian empire.

As Nazi Germany expanded into western Poland, the Soviet Union occupied Baltic territories and eastern Poland.

Edited by: Fatima Sule/Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)
Related

Continue Reading

Foreign

Thousands of documents on Nazi victims published online

Published

on

The Arolsen Archives International Centre on Nazi Persecution has published online thousands of documents on people persecuted by the Nazis.

A statement from the institution in the North Central German town of Bad Arolsen on Tuesday said it wanted to document the crimes of the Nazis and find missing persons.

“After World War II, the Allied occupying powers had a mammoth task in front of them.’’

The Arolsen Archives have now made these documents freely accessible via the internet.

In the U.S. occupied zone alone, 850,000 documents with information on 10 million names were created.

In order for the information to be retrieved quickly, the Arolsen Archives have obtained support from an online platform for genealogy research.

The research is to help with the processing, provision of data and publication of the documents in the organisation’s own online archive.

Giora Zwilling, the head of unit at the Arolsen Archives said “the data collected by Ancestry enrich our online archive with a wealth of valuable information, such as the whereabouts of foreign forced labourers.

The Arolsen Archives have the world’s most comprehensive archive on the victims and survivors of the Nazi regime.

The collection is backed up by the former Nazi victim search service, the International Tracing Service (ITS).

These references to around 17.5 million people form part of the UNESCO world documentary heritage.

Edited by Hadiza Mohammed/Donald Ugwu

Continue Reading

Foreign

Norway mosque shooting suspect makes Nazi salute at remand hearing

Published

on

A Norwegian man allegedly accused of carrying out a shooting at a mosque near Oslo in August appeared in court on Monday where police were seeking a four-week extension of his pre-trial detention.


Philip Manshaus, 22, is charged with terrorism and the murder of his stepsister.


Norwegian media outlets reported on entering the Oslo district court room, Manshaus made a Nazi salute.


Although Monday’s hearing was in an open court a gag order prevented media from reporting on what Manshaus said, including a statement he read out.


He is also charged with murder after the body of his 17-year-old stepsister, who was adopted from China, was found at his home in Baerum.


Manshaus also made Nazi salutes at his three previous hearings.


He has been in pre-trial detention since Aug. 12.


No one was hit or seriously injured at the Al-Noor Islamic Centre mosque in Baerum on Aug. 10, as Manshaus was overpowered after a struggle with two mosque members.


Norwegian media outlets have reported that Manshaus posted a message praising mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, in March, a few hours before the mosque attack in Baerum.


HS/MST


Edited by Halima Sheji/Muhammad Suleiman Tola

Continue Reading

Foreign

Former Nazi camp guard admits seeing Jews led into gas chamber

Published

on

Gas

Hamburg, Oct. 25, 2019 A man accused of complicity in the Holocaust told a German court on Friday that he had observed people being locked into gas chambers and had heard them screaming to be released.

But the man insisted that he had not known they were being murdered.

When asked by judge Anne Meier-Goering what exactly he had seen while working as a guard at the Stutthof concentration camp, the 93-year-old defendant said he had seen between 20 and 30 people “being led … into the gas chamber, and that the door was locked.”

“I didn’t know that they were being gassed in there,” he said, adding that he had “never seen anyone come out.”

The nonogenarian is accused of accessory to murder in 5,230 cases during his stint as a concentration camp guard in Sutthof between Aug. 9, 1944 and April 26, 1945.

Prosecutors say he “supported the insidious and cruel killing of mainly Jewish prisoners.”

For decades after the war, German courts argued that the top Nazi leadership was principally to blame for the mass murder of Jews.

Lower-ranking individuals in the Holocaust machinery, the courts said, were bound by a chain of command and, therefore, less culpable.

That approach changed radically after a legal precedent set by the 2011 conviction of John Demjanjuk, who was found guilty as an accessory to the murder of more than 28,000 Jews while he was a guard at the Sobibor camp in Nazi-occupied Poland.

Edited by: Fatima Sule/Felix Ajide
(NAN)

 

Continue Reading

Foreign

Germany still conducting criminal proceedings against 29 WWII Nazis

Published

on

Germany is still conducting criminal proceedings against 29 people for their involvement in Nazi crimes during World War II, including guards at concentration camps, German public broadcaster NDR said on Tuesday.

In total, investigations are being carried out into 50 named individuals, including some women, NDR said.

In many cases, it is not clear if the suspects are still alive or not.

A court in Hamburg will in October open a trial against a 93-year-old former guard at the concentration camp Stutthof near Gdansk in modern-day Poland.

The man is charged with accessory to murder in 5,230 cases.

Investigators in Hamburg are also looking into a case against a 97-year-old woman, who was once a supervisor at the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen, and who is suspected to have been involved in a “death march” in 1945, during which 1,400 women were killed.

As the Allied forces closed in on Nazi Germany towards the end of World War II, the Nazis ordered that many concentration camps be emptied, with guards forcing thousands of former inmates to walk for miles, resulting in hundreds of thousands of deaths.

NDR said most of the cases had been sparked by preliminary investigations conducted at the central office in Ludwigsburg charged with resolving crimes conducted by the Nazi regime.

The authorities there attempt to find out if possible perpetrators are still alive, and whether they can be charged.

Once the preliminary investigations are complete, the Ludwigsburg authorities pass on any information to prosecutors across Germany, who then determines whether formal proceedings can take place.
FAT/DCU

Edited by Fatima Sule/Donald Ugwu

Continue Reading

Foreign

Russia contests EU decision that Nazi-Soviet pact led to World War II

Published

on

 

 

 Russia on Friday contested the position of a recently adopted European Union’s (EU) resolution that the 1939 non-aggression pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union “paved the way for the outbreak of World War II.”

Russia’s Foreign Ministry denounced the European Parliament resolution as politicized revisionism, noting that the text did not mention Western powers’ 1938 Munich Agreement enabling Nazi Germany’s invasion of Czechoslovakia.

“The European Parliament marked yet another outrageous attempt to equate Nazi Germany – the aggressor country – and the Soviet Union, whose peoples, at the cost of huge sacrifices, liberated Europe from fascism,” the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

The Nazi-Soviet pact is rarely discussed in today’s Russia, whereas the Allied – and particularly Soviet – victory over Nazi Germany, ending the war in Europe, remains a much celebrated source of national pride.

The EU resolution, adopted on Thursday, said the pact set out to divide Europe “between the two totalitarian regimes” of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.

The pact is commonly known for the diplomats who signed it in Moscow as the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact.

Historians say that Soviet leader Josef Stalin used the pact as an opportunity to annex territories that, before the 1917 communist revolution, had belonged to the Russian empire. As Nazi Germany expanded into western Poland, the Soviet Union occupied Baltic territories and eastern Poland.

Russia has preserved the Soviet position that the pact was a necessary evil, an attempt to prevent the Nazi offensive into the Soviet Union – which nevertheless came two years after the signing, when Nazi Germany attacked the Soviet Union in 1941.

YEE

Edited by Emmanuel Yashim

Continue Reading

Foreign

Russia contests EU decision that Nazi-Soviet pact led to World War II

Published

on

Russia on Friday contested the position of a recently adopted EU resolution that the 1939 non-aggression pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union led to the outbreak of World War II.
Russia’s Foreign Ministry denounced the European Parliament resolution as politicised revisionism, noting that the text did not mention Western powers’ 1938 Munich Agreement enabling Nazi Germany’s invasion of Czechoslovakia.
According to the Russian Foreign Ministry, the European Parliament marked yet another outrageous attempt to equate Nazi Germany, the aggressor country, and the Soviet Union, whose peoples, at the cost of huge sacrifices, liberated Europe from fascism.
The Nazi-Soviet pact is rarely discussed in today’s Russia, whereas the Allied, particularly Soviet’s victory over Nazi Germany, ending the war in Europe, remained a much celebrated source of national pride.
The EU resolution, that had just been adopted, said the pact set out to divide Europe between the two totalitarian regimes of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.
The pact is commonly known for the diplomats who signed it in Moscow as the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact.
However, historians believed that Soviet leader Josef Stalin, used the pact as an opportunity to annex territories that, before the 1917 communist revolution, belonged to the Russian empire.
Meanwhile, as Nazi Germany expanded into western Poland, the Soviet Union occupied Baltic territories and eastern Poland.
Russia, however, preserved the Soviet position that the pact was a necessary evil, an attempt to prevent the Nazi offensive into the Soviet Union.
This, nevertheless, came two years after the signing, when Nazi Germany attacked the Soviet Union in 1941.
YI/ABI
==
Edited by Yahaya Isah

Continue Reading

Foreign

Art stolen by Nazis returned to heirs of Jewish couple

Published

on

Nine works of art, stolen from a Jewish couple before they were sent to their deaths in a Nazi concentration camp, were returned to the representatives of their heirs in Munich on Monday.

“Hardy Langer, who accepted the works on behalf of the heirs, expressed thanks for this act of justice,’’ Langer said.

“The works will be sold to a collector.

“The Nazi Secret State Police (Gestapo) seized the works in November 1938 from the couple, who had lived in Munich since 1917.’’

The Davidsohns were deported to Theresienstadt, now Terezin in the Czech Republic, where Julius Davidsohn died in August 1942.

Semaya Davidsohn was murdered in April 1943.

The works ended up in the Bavarian state collections in 1955, the restitution was the 15th by the Bavarian state collections since 1998. (dpa/NAN)

YI/AIB

Continue Reading

Foreign

New witness account could find Nazis guilty of 1933 Reichstag fire

Published

on

Germany may be inching closer to solving the decades old mystery fire at the Reichstag building in Berlin in 1933, after finding a new witness account in the archives of a court in Hanover.

The account by a member of the Nazis’ paramilitary Sturmabteilung (SA) was seen by dpa on Friday.

“It stated that he drove the Dutch communist Marinus van der Lubbe, who was later executed by the Nazis Reichstag on the night of the fire.

“When the witness, identified as Hans-Martin Lennings and his colleagues arrived with van der Lubbe at the Reichstag, he writes that he noticed a strange smell of burning and clouds of smoke billowing through the rooms.

“The fire at the Reichstag on Feb. 27, 1933, was attributed to van der Lubbe, who was executed for arson.

“However, since the end of the Nazi regime, van der Lubbe’s guilt has been called into question.

“The Nazis accused the communists of starting the fire and exploited the incident to introduce emergency powers that effectively suspended the constitution, paving the way for Hitler’s dictatorship.

“Officially, it remained a mystery who actually started the fire.”

However, Lennings further stated in his account that he and his colleagues later protested against the arrest of van der Lubbe.

“Because we were convinced that van der Lubbe could not possibly have been the arsonist, because according to our observation, the Reichstag had already been burning when we dropped him off there.

“Lennings, who died in 1962, asked that his account be certified in 1955, in case Reichstag fire case ever went back to trial.

“Anotion that has been discussed in the past to posthumously clear van der Lubbe’s name.

Continue Reading

Foreign

German police investigating pupils for sharing Nazi symbols online

Published

on

Police in the southern German town of Leonberg are investigating five school pupils for sharing far-right symbols and pornography in a chat group, a police spokeswoman said on Friday.

Police said they considered the actions to be teenage misbehaviour, and that the messages they shared with each other had not been sent to anyone outside the group chat.

Part of a letter to the pupils’ parents from the headmaster of their school, Klaus Nowotzin, was published in the mass-circulation Bild newspaper, in which the headmaster writes that the chat contained swastikas, the Hitler salute, sexualized caricatures and disparaging remarks about people with Down’s Syndrome.

An image of a machine gun and the subtitle “solves 1,800 asylum applications per minute” was also reportedly found. The headmaster subsequently contacted police over the issue.

The south-western state of Baden-Wuerttemberg requires public schools to report any incidents of anti-Semitism, racism or acts against other religious minorities.

Susanne Eisenmann, the State’s Minister for Culture, called on the school to address the incident with the pupils.

“In cases such as the one in Leonberg, this should of course happen with the support of law enforcement authorities,” she said.

Eisenmann underlined the fact that far-right symbols and slogans – which are banned in Germany – as well as any discriminatory content have no place in schools.

Continue Reading

Foreign

Putin urges collaboration against neo-Nazism

Published

on

Collaboration

“Russia is open for cooperation with all who are ready to counter terrorism, neo-Nazism and extremism,” Putin said in a speech at a military parade in Moscow.

This week marks the 74th anniversary of the capitulation of Nazi Germany that ended World War II in Europe.

The Allied victory remains an enduring source of national pride in Russia.

“More than 13, 000 military personnel participated in Thursday’s parade in central Moscow,’’ the Kremlin said in a statement.

It showcased 130 examples of Russian military equipment, including the advanced S-400 missile system.

“We call on all countries to recognise our shared responsibility for establishing an effective and equal security system,” Putin said on Red Square.

Former President of the neighbouring Central Asian Republic of Kazakhstan, Nursultan Nazarbayev, who resigned a month and a half ago after decades as leader, sat beside Putin as a guest of honour during the festivities.

A suspected group of neo-Nazis, believed to have operated in the central Russian regions of Moscow, Vladimir and Ryazan, was detained in raids earlier this week.

The group has been accused of committing attacks on migrant workers.

Media reports said extremist literature promoting Nazism was seized during the searches.

Russia must continue to combat attempts to “heroize Nazism,’’ a senior Russian Foreign Ministry official, Grigory Lukyantsev, said this week in comments carried by state media.

Continue Reading

Agriculture

French Monument of Synagogue destroyed by Nazis is vandalised

Published

on

Monument to French synagogue destroyed by Nazis is vandalised

 

French Monument of Synagogue destroyed by Nazis is vandalised

Monument

Paris, March 2, 2019 (dpa/NNN) A monument marking the site of a synagogue destroyed during the Nazi occupation of France was found vandalised on Saturday, authorities in the eastern city of Strasbourg said.

The marble slab on the site of the old synagogue, set on fire by Hitler Youth members in 1940 and later demolished, had been pushed off its base, photographs published by regional newspaper Dernieres Nouvelles d’Alsace showed.

Strasbourg Mayor Roland Ries told France 3 Television that it was clearly an anti-Semitic act.

The slab “must weigh 300 or 400 kilogrammes,’’ Ries said. “It wasn’t pushed off by a single individual.’’

The vandalism was the latest in a string of apparently anti-Semitic incidents that have drawn condemnation from French authorities and the country’s Jewish community, thought to be the biggest in Europe.

In February, 12 graves were painted with Nazi swastikas in a Jewish cemetery in a village near Strasbourg.

Anti-Semitic vandalism was also reported in Paris.

Thousands of people rallied in central Paris to condemn anti-Semitism.

President Emmanuel Macron promised a new law against online hate crime and asked Interior Minister Christophe Castaner to dissolve organisations inciting hatred and violence.

“I say once again: Enough!’’, Ries wrote on Facebook on Saturday after visiting the vandalised memorial in Strasbourg. (dpa/NNN)

AIJ/IFY

Edited by Abigael Joshua/Ifeyinwa Omowole

 

Continue Reading

Agriculture

Remains of hundreds of Jews unearthed in Nazi-era mass grave in Belarus

Published

on

Remains of hundreds of Jews unearthed in Nazi-era mass grave in Belarus

Grave
Brest (Belarus), Feb. 26, 2019 (Reuters/NNN) Soldiers in Belarus have unearthed the bones of hundreds of people shot during World War Two from a mass grave discovered at the site of a ghetto where Jews lived under the Nazis.

The grave was uncovered by chance in January on a construction site in a residential area in the centre of Brest near the Polish border.

Soldiers wearing white masks on Tuesday sifted through the site with spades, trowels and their gloved hands to collect the bones.

They also found items such as leather shoes that had not rotted.

Dmitry Kaminsky, a soldier leading the unit, said they had exhumed 730 bodies so far, but could not be sure how many more would be found.

“It’s possible they go further under the road. We have to cut open the tarmac road. Then we’ll know,” he said.

Some of the skulls bore bullet holes, he said, suggesting the victims had been executed by a shot to the back of the head.

Belarus, a former Soviet republic, was occupied by Nazi Germany during World War Two and tens of thousands of its Jews were killed by the Nazis.

The site of the mass grave served from December 1941 to October 1942 as part of a ghetto, areas created by the Nazis to segregate Jews and sometimes other minorities from other city dwellers.

Brest was part of Poland before the war.

The remains were discovered when builders began to lay the foundations for an apartment block.

Local authorities want to bury the bodies in a ceremony at a cemetery in the north of the city.

“We want to be sure that there are no more mass graves here,” said Alla Kondak, a Local Culture Official. (Reuters/NNN)
FAT/AFA

Edited by Fatima Sule/Felix Ajide

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Latest News