Connect with us

General news

People with Disabilities suffer more from acts of corruption – Executive Director

Published

on

The Executive Director, Kaduna State Rehabilitation Board, Alhaji Aliyu Yakassai, on Monday said that people with disabilities were worse affected by corruption because of their peculiarities.

Yakasai made the remarks at a symposium in Kaduna organised to mark the International Day of People with Disabilities.

The symposium, with the theme ‘Nigeria Disability Act as panacea to corruption’, was organised by the Centre for Citizens with Disabilities (CCD) in collaboration with the board.

The executive director noted that though corruption has negative consequences on all segments of the society, but its effects on people with disabilities was tragic.

He noted that the event was also organised to sensitise people with disabilities on the provisions of the Disability Act signed into law by President Muhammadu Buhari in 2018.

Yakassai said people with disabilities should appreciate the provisions of the law and speak out whenever discriminated against or stigmatised.

“The act is already on ground to protect you and we in the rehabilitation board are ever ready to render our support,” he added.

He stressed the need to provide enabling environment for person with disabilities to support themselves and contribute to national growth and development.

Also, Mrs Peace Ezikiel, the CCD focal officer, said the symposium was to create awareness for people with disabilities in the state and also discuss the extent to which corruption affects person with disabilities in the society.

She said the centre will continue to advocate for the rights of people with disabilities including access to health care, education, infrastructure among others.

In his remarks, National President of Association of Persons with Disabilities, Malam Rilwan Mohammed streesed the need for more sensitization on the rights of persons with disabilities.

Mohammed challenged members of the association to lead in agitating for their rights on all issues affecting them.

He emplore the media to create space for person with disabilities to speak on their challenges and contributions to societal development.

Hajiya Sadiya Hassan of Kaduna State Minstry of Justice, said the state government was in the process of domesticating the Disabilities Act.

She assured that the ministry was every ready to render support to persons with disability in the state.

Nigeria News Agency report that panelists at the symposium included Mr Chidi Ahuchogu of the EFCC and Mr John Yusuf, Asistant Director, Special Education, Kaduna state.

NAN recalled that the Act provides for the setting up of a National Commission for Person with Disabilities to enhance their full integration into the society.

Edited & Vetted By: Maharazu Ahmed
(NAN)

Foreign

People take part in protest over death of George Floyd in central Sydney, Australia

Published

on

By

People take part in a protest over the death of George Floyd in central Sydney, Australia, on June 6, 2020. (Xinhua/Bai Xuefei)

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

People attend protest over death of George Floyd in Los Altos

Published

on

By

People attend a protest over the death of George Floyd in Los Altos of the San Francisco Bay Area, the United States, June 5, 2020. (Photo by Dong Xudong/Xinhua)

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

People participate in march to mark World Environment Day in Athens, Greece

Published

on

By

Cyclists participate in a march marking the World Environment Day in Athens, Greece, June 5, 2020, (Photo by Lefteris Partsalis/Xinhua)

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Feature: Thousands march in Australian cities over treatment of Indigenous Peoples

Published

on

By

Huge crowds marched Saturday in Black Lives Matter demonstrations across Australia, including in Sydney where a Supreme Court decision banning the protest was overturned at the last minute.

The rallies were held to draw attention to Aboriginal deaths in police custody and in solidarity with widespread demonstrations in the United States.

Thousands of people turned out in Brisbane and Adelaide, with even larger crowds in the more populous cities of Melbourne and Sydney, after the New South Wales (NSW) State Court of Appeal ruled in favour of authorising the Sydney protest.

On Friday organizers in Sydney were told the event could not go ahead due to concerns over the spread of COVID-19, however a large number of people made their intention to attend the demonstration, despite risking arrest if they did.

Minutes before the demonstration was scheduled to begin, and after a large crowd had already gathered, the news came through that the protest would be considered lawful, with police aiming to accommodate the demonstrators while maintaining peace.

Most of the protesters wore masks and volunteers distributed hand sanitiser throughout the crowds, however with such large numbers of people, recommended social distancing was difficult to maintain.

While the death of George Floyd and occurrences in the United States were the clear catalyst for the demonstrations, the focus was largely on the treatment of Australia’s First Nations Peoples, mainly police brutality and an inflated number of deaths in custody.

Since 1991, 432 First Nations Peoples have died while in the custody of police, according to data from the Guardian. One of them, 26-year-old Dunghutti man David Dungay, passed away in 2015 while being restrained by five officers despite repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe.”

Members of Dungay’s family who were in attendance in Sydney, expressed their shock and grief at the similarities between his death and that of George Floyd in the United States, but said they were heartened by the significant amount of support on display.

“I look around and see so many signs and so many faces — it’s overwhelming,” Dungay’s nephew told the crowd.

One of the protesters in Sydney, Alyssia Gibbs told Xinhua that she had been to similar demonstrations in the past and would continue to do so as long as it took to achieve justice for Indigenous Australians.

“No one’s going to listen to you if you’re just posting on social media. If you get thousands of people in the same place chanting the same thing with the same message, people will listen,” Gibbs said.

While the demonstrations were largely peaceful, tensions briefly flared on the steps of Sydney’s Town Hall after a counter-protester took to the stage wielding a sign reading All Lives Matter, drawing the anger of the crowd before he was arrested by police.

At 4:32 p.m. local time, thousands of demonstrators in Sydney knelt and observed a minute of silence in recognition of the 432 Aboriginal deaths in police custody, and the international Black Lives Matter movement.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Colombia captures 50 people suspected of plant, animal trafficking

Published

on

By

Up to 50 people have been arrested on suspicion of illegally trafficking plants and animals in Colombia, the government said Friday.

These people illegally commercialized Colombia’s exotic wildlife by advertising species through social networks or via instant messaging groups, and sold them on demand, according to a government statement.

The authorities have recovered 502 species of animals and 38 specimens of plants, and also seized 51 cubic meters of wood in the operation.

Colombia now ranks as the second most biodiverse country in the world after its neighbor Brazil. However, illegal trafficking of animals and plants has also drawn much concern in the country.

Since the beginning of this year, Colombian environmental authorities have seized 52,000 species of flora and 11,436 species of fauna, as well as over 41,500 cubic meters of wood, leading to the arrest of some 2,200 people, according to figures from the government.

Colombia had planned to host this year’s World Environment Day, which fell on Thursday with the theme of “Time for Nature,” but an outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic forced the event to be held online across the globe.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

People shop at reopened market in Bury, Britain

Published

on

By

People shop at reopened Bury Market in Bury, near Manchester, Britain, June 5, 2020. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on May 28 unveiled some “limited” and “cautious” easing of the country’s coronavirus lockdown measures. Outdoor retail and car showrooms started to open from June 1 and other non-essential retail will open on June 15. (Photo by Jon Super/Xinhua)

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

People buy fresh spot prawns in Richmond, Canada

Published

on

By

People line up to buy fresh spot prawns with social distancing at Steveston Fisherman’s Wharf in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada, Jun 5, 2020. This year’s spot prawn season was delayed due to lack of market during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Liang Sen/Xinhua)

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

People perform Friday prayer with COVID-19 prevention measures in Amman, Jordan

Published

on

By

People keep social distance as they perform Friday prayer in a mosque in Amman, Jordan, on June 5, 2020. Jordan registered 19 more infections on Friday, bringing the total coronavirus cases in the kingdom to 784, including nine deaths and 571 recoveries. (Photo by Mohammad Abu Ghosh/Xinhua)

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

People collect recyclable items at garbage dump site in India

Published

on

By

People collect recyclable items at a garbage dump site in Agartala, Tripura, India, on June 5, 2020. World Environment Day, a United Nations (UN) campaign to raise awareness about the protection of the environment, is celebrated every year on June 5. (Str/Xinhua)

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also