Foreign

Top diplomats from South Korea, China, Japan to meet Aug. 20

Published

on

Top diplomats from South Korea, China, Japan to meet Aug. 20

Meeting

A three-day meeting has been scheduled for August 20-22 in Beijing to strengthen the basis for the “system of cooperation,” the South Korean Foreign Ministry said on Friday.

It remained unclear whether bilateral talks between South Korea’s top diplomat and her Japanese counterpart would come to pass.

The relationship between the two countries has deteriorated significantly as a result of a recent trade dispute.

Japan issued stricter controls for the export of important materials used to produce semiconductors and displays to South Korea in July.

The move’s backstory centres on a dispute over restitution for Korean forced labourers under the colonial rule of Japan.

In South Korea, the foreign ministers’ meeting is expected to include preparations for a summit between Chinese President Xi Jinping, South Korean leader Moon Jae In and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

At a summit in May 2018 attended by Chinese Premier  Xi Jinping, the three countries agreed to encourage the nuclear disarmament of North Korea. (dpa/NAN)

FAT/AFA

Foreign

Ethiopian prime minister Abiy to accept Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo

Published

on

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is due to accept the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize at a ceremony in Oslo on Tuesday, the first of the annual awards to be presented.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited Abiy “for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea” and his efforts for “peace and international cooperation”.

Abiy is the first Ethiopian to be awarded a Nobel prize.

The number of peace prize nominees this year – composed of 223 individuals and 78 organisations – is the fourth-highest since 1901.

The peace prize is one of the awards endowed by Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite.

In accordance with Nobel’s will, the peace prize is handed out in Oslo.

Later Tuesday, the Nobel prizes for medicine, physics, chemistry, literature and economics were to be presented in the Swedish capital, Stockholm.

Two literature laureates were due on stage at the Stockholm Concert Hall: Polish author Olga Tokarczuk, the 2018 laureate, and Austrian author Peter Handke, the 2019 laureate.

Handke’s selection has sparked controversy, not the least in the former Yugoslavia over his support for Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic who has been accused for atrocities in Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo during the 1990s.

Protests were planned in Stockholm over Handke’s award, but a protest in support of him was also touted.

The dual award announcement was due to a crisis that engulfed the Swedish Academy last year, prompting the postponement of the 2018 announcement.

The award ceremonies are traditionally held on Dec. 10, the anniversary of Nobel’s death.

YEE

Edited by: Emmanuel YYashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Democrats expected to announce impeachment articles on Tuesday

Published

on

 Democrats in the U.S. House Judiciary Committee are expected to announce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Tuesday, a lawmaker told multiple U.S. media outlets.

Elliot Engel, the House Foreign Affairs Chairman, told reporters that the articles of impeachment were likely be unveiled at a news conference on Tuesday morning.

It is unclear how many articles will be introduced and on what charges the articles will be based.

Democrats say that Trump withheld military aid to Ukraine as part of a pressure campaign to get Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate Trump’s domestic political rival Joe Biden and conspiracy theories related to the 2016 presidential election.

According to the Democrats, Trump abused power and committed bribery, accusations which Trump denies.

Once the Democrats’ articles of impeachment are formally introduced, they are likely to go through changes before leaving the House Judiciary Committee and are put up for a general vote.

If the Democrat-controlled House votes in favour of the impeachment articles, then the process moves to the Republican-controlled Senate, where Trump’s supporters have promised to defend the president.

On Monday Democrats held a public hearing summing up their case against the president.

House Judiciary Committee staff lawyers for majority Democrats laid out evidence for impeachment over Trump’s dealings with Ukraine earlier this year, while a committee lawyer for minority Republicans rebutted the claims in sometimes heated exchanges.

We are here today because Donald J Trump, the 45th president of the United States, abused the power of his office, the American presidency, for his political and personal benefit,” Daniel Goldman, a lawyer for Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee, said in his opening statement.

Democrats say a back-and-forth during a July 25 call between Trump and Zelensky showed a “quid pro quo” that put Trump’s own personal political interests over U.S. national security.

Trump has vehemently denied any wrongdoing, and on Monday he tweeted about the hearing, citing a comment from Zelensky that Trump did nothing wrong.

If the Radical Left Democrats were sane, which they are not, it would be case over!” he tweeted.

Republicans on the committee said that the evidence presented since the inquiry was announced in September, based on a whistleblower’s report, was thin and the process used by the Democrats unfair.

But the Democrats’ lawyer for the Judiciary Committee told lawmakers that the evidence against Trump was “overwhelming” and revealed a “brazen” scheme.

Barry Berke said that impeaching him was an urgent matter because he could potentially repeat the behaviour.

This is a big deal. President Trump did what a president of our nation is not allowed to do,” Berke said.

In addition to Goldman and Berke the committee heard testimony from Stephen Castor, a lawyer for Republicans on both committees.

He said that the process was “not warranted” based on the evidence and that a “compelling argument” to take a decision “out of the hands of the voters” was lacking.

The full House could vote on articles of impeachment as early as Friday.

The inquiry’s leaders have not yet named the specific impeachable offences they may vote on.

Once articles of impeachment are passed – as expected in the Democrats-dominated House – the articles would then move to the Republican-controlled Senate, where Democrats appear unlikely to rally enough Republicans to vote to remove Trump from office.

Democrats in the House appear undeterred by that reality.

Democrats have said that the matter is too important, citing it as an example of what the framers of the U.S. Constitution intended to stop when they gave Congress the ability to remove a president through impeachment.

Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler said in his opening statement that Trump “put himself before country” as monarchs of the past had done.

Nadler was forced to pound his gavel several times and warn Republican members not to interrupt as they bickered over procedural matters.

He also was forced to order a number of roll call votes to satisfy Republican demands, even once over a question of whether the committee should take a break.

Republicans complained bitterly about the timing of the impeachment process just a year before the next presidential election and said that the evidence didn’t show that impeachable offences had been committed.

Representative Douglas Collins complained that the Democrats had put the House in danger by abusing its power, saying that the hearings had been “all military,” and adding, “It’s a show”.

YEE

Edited by: Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Namibia to deport 53 refugees back to S. Africa

Published

on

A police commissioner, David Indongo said on Monday that Namibia would deport 53 foreign nationals who fled neighbouring South Africa following a recent wave of xenophobic attacks.

The commissioner said that the 53 foreign nationals who had camped at the Osire refugee camp, were transported on Saturday morning by immigration officials to the southern border settlement of Noordoewer in preparation for their deportation.

The refugees, who include 14 men, 13 women and 26 children, are being accommodated at the EHW Baard Primary School hostel in Noordoewer,’’ he said.

According to the Namibian police, the majority of the refugees are Congolese and Angolan nationals who have South African-issued asylum permits.

The 53 formed part of more than 600 refugees and asylum seekers who had camped at the UN’s High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) offices in Cape Town and Pretoria while demanding to be taken to safer countries abroad.

Edited by: Hadiza Mohammed/Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Japan to pay additional $13.8bn for 2011 quake reconstruction

Published

on

 Government officials on Monday said that Japan would be expected to pay an additional reconstruction cost of 1.5 trillion yen (13.8 billion U.S. dollars) for the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis in northeastern Japan.

According to the government, the additional costs will be generated in the fiscal period between 2021 and 2025.

The officials said that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s cabinet would likely adopt a draft reconstruction policy drawn up by a government committee by the end of the year, while related bills are expected to be submitted during 2020 ordinary Diet session.

According to the government, the total expenditure for reconstruction work through 2020 is estimated at slightly more than 31 trillion yen (285.2 billion dollars).

According to the draft, the government will use tax revenue including an increase in income tax 2020 to fund the reconstruction works from fiscal 2021 to 2025.

The Japanese government also plans to extend the work of the Reconstruction Agency for an extra 10 years, compared to its closure originally planned to take place in March 2021 so that it can continue aiding reconstruction of areas contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster.

Established in February 2012, the agency has been working as the central control point for efforts to reconstruct disaster-stricken areas.

Edited by: Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Edited by: Hadiza Mohammed
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

U.S. indicts 40 public officials for corruption

Published

on

The United States Government says it has indicted “almost 40 public officials” and their immediate family members around the world for corruption this year.

U.S. Secretary of State, Mr Mike Pompeo, disclosed this in a statement on the occasion of the 2019 International Anti-Corruption Day on Monday.

He said the indictment was pursuant to Section 7031(c) of the Department of State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2019.

Pompeo said the U.S. would continue to use of the instrument “to prevent corrupt officials of foreign governments and their immediate family members from traveling to and spending their ill-gotten gains in the United States”.

“On this day, we renew our call to all countries to address the scourge of corruption.

“They should effectively implement their international anticorruption commitments, including those under the UN Convention against Corruption,” he said.

The Secretary of State also urged them to support civil society and the media journalists; “and take measures to promote open and accountable governance”.

Edited by: Sadiya Hamza
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Youth empowerment, mobilisation key in anti-graft war — UNGA president

Published

on

 The President of the UN General Assembly (PGA), Amb. Tijani Muhammad-Bande, has called for  active engagement of young people in the fight against corruption.

The way we engage young people today will determine the prospects for sustainable development and peace.

Mobilising and empowering Youth for Justice is key to ensuring sustainable solutions to combating corruption,” he said in a message to mark the 2019 International Anti-Corruption Day.

Referencing findings that an estimated 2.6 trillion dollars is stolen through corruption globally every year, Muhammad-Bande urged stronger international collaboration to check the menace.

He said: “The International Anti-Corruption Day is an opportunity to acknowledge and promote the efforts against corruption and bribery worldwide.

According to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development’, we need to fully address corruption to have any hope of achieving the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development.

 

Corruption diverts resources away from poverty-eradication efforts. It fuels conflict and disharmony in society.

I have set poverty eradication and quality education as key priorities for the 74th Session of the General Assembly.

Corruption also hinders the achievement of quality education at the same time, education is a crucial element to effectively address the phenomenon of corruption.

It fosters attitudes that do not tolerate corruption.

The PGA described corruption as a serious global challenge to which no country is immune.

He, therefore, called on stakeholders to use the day to rededicate themselves to fight against corruption, including through cooperation and partnerships. 

Edited by: Chukwudi Ekezie
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Namibia launches book honouring founding president

Published

on

Namibia launches book honouring founding president

Launch

Windhoek, Dec. 9, 2019 Namibia on Monday launched a book “teaching and leading by example’’ in honour of their founding president, Sam Nujoma.

The book depicts him as a pragmatic and visionary leader who led Namibia in pursuit of justice, rule of law, gender equality and self-determination.

Speaking at the launch, Prime Minister Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila said Nujoma led with distinction and example.

“It is only a humble and dignified leader who after having defeated a bitter enemy, can hold out an olive branch in the spirit of peace and reconciliation to forgive past wrongs and move towards building a nation.

“Because of his humility, Nujoma laid a solid foundation of peace in a country torn apart by war.’’

The nine-chapter book summarises leadership attributes of Nujoma, who was also described as a man full of humility.

The book is published by the Sam Nujoma foundation, with contributions from local and international scholars.

Edited by: Hadiza Mohammed/Donald Ugwu
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Erdogan says Turkey ready to help Afghanistan eliminate IS

Published

on

 Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on Monday that Turkey would give all the necessary support for the eradication of the Islamic State (IS) from Afghanistan.

The outbreak of Daesh virus in Afghanistan must be prevented,” Erdogan said at the eighth ministerial conference of Heart of Asia Istanbul Process in Istanbul, using the Arabic name of the IS.

The Heart of Asia – Istanbul Process was established to provide a platform to discuss regional issues, particularly encouraging security, political, and economic cooperation among Afghanistan and its neighbours.

The process began with the Istanbul conference in Afghanistan in 2011 upon the initiative of Turkey.

To prevent terrorist organisations from finding a favorable environment in the region, the international community needs to boost material and moral investments in Afghanistan, the president said.

Neglecting Afghanistan by focusing on some of the gains achieved in recent years will result in irreparable damage,” he stressed.

In his view, the private sector and regional projects should play a major role in the economic and social development of Afghanistan.

Edited by: Hadiza Mohammed/Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

UN urges Somalia to step up fight against graft

Published

on

The UN senior envoy in Somalia on Monday called on the government to strengthen the fight against corruption which is an obstacle to development and public trust.

James Swan, the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Somalia acknowledged the country’s progress in strengthening the rule of law and building accountable and transparent institutions.

Corruption is a major obstacle to development,” he said.

It undermines efforts toward state-building, peace and reconciliation. It erodes public trust and weakens state institutions’ ability to deliver to their people,”

Swan said the UN was very encouraged by the recent signing into law of the Bill on the establishment of the anti-corruption commission by President Mohamed Farmajo, and the elaboration of the national anti-corruption strategy.

These are commendable steps forward for Somalia,” he said.

He said a key instrument to sustain, manage and track countries’ fight against corruption was the UN Convention against Corruption, the world’s only legally binding universal anti-corruption instrument.

According to Swan, though Somalia is yet to sign and ratify the Convention, the UN welcomes steps that are being taken toward the goal, such as the progress with the anti-corruption commission and the anti-corruption strategy.

He said that the UN system had since established an anti-corruption platform with international financial institutions and other development partners to provide technical and advisory services to Somalia in its efforts to curb corruption.

Swan said that other UN programmes that mobilised resources to support the country’s anti-corruption efforts across the country, centered on institutions and awareness-raising and on the judicial aspects of anti-corruption.

Edited by: Yahaya Isah/Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Latest News

editor@nnn.com.ng