Connect with us

Foreign

UK to impose 14-day quarantine on new arrivals as COVID-19 deaths hit 36,393

Published

on

New arrivals to Britain must self-isolate for two weeks from June 8, with fines for anyone who breaches the measure designed to prevent a second wave of coronavirus from overseas, Home Secretary Priti Patel said Friday.

Chairing the Downing Street briefing, Patel said passengers will need to provide their contact and travel information so they can be traced if infections arise. They could also be contacted regularly during the whole quarantine and face random checks from public health authorities.

Rule breakers would face a 1,000 pounds (1,217 U.S. dollars) fixed penalty notice in England and border force will be able to refuse entry to any non-British citizens who refuses to comply with these regulations, said the Home Office in a statement. Removal from the country could be used as a last resort, it said.

Those in quarantine will not be allowed to accept visitors, unless they are providing essential support, and should not go out to buy food or other essentials where they can rely on others, said the Home Office.

The mandatory self-isolation would not apply to people coming from Ireland, medics tackling COVID-19 and seasonal agricultural workers, said Patel.

The new move came as another 351 COVID-19 patients have died in Britain as of Thursday afternoon, bringing the total coronavirus-related death toll in the country to 36,393, according to the Department of Health and Social Care.

The figures include deaths in all settings, including hospitals, care homes and the wider community.

As of Friday morning, 254,195 people have tested positive for the disease in the country, marking a daily increase of 3,287, said the department.

Earlier in the day, Downing Street did not rule out London emerging from the lockdown sooner than other parts of the country, The Guardian newspaper reported.

“As we are able to gather more data and have better surveillance of a rate of infection in different parts of the country then we will be able to lift measures quicker in some parts of the country than in others,” the prime minister’s official spokesman was quoted as saying.

In another development, China‘s COVID-19 vaccine trial has shown some promising results as world is seeking solutions to the pandemic.

China‘s COVID-19 vaccine trial, the first such vaccine to reach phase 1 clinical trial, has been found to be safe, well-tolerated, and able to generate an immune response against SARS-CoV-2 in humans, according to a study published online on Friday by the medical journal The Lancet.

(XINHUA)

Foreign

Russia’s COVID-19 cases near 415,000

Published

on

By

Russia has confirmed 9,035 new COVID-19 cases in the past 24 hours, raising its total to 414,878, its coronavirus response center said in a statement Monday.

The death toll increased by 162 to 4,855, while 175,877 people have recovered, including 3,994 over the last 24 hours, according to the statement.

Moscow, the country’s worst-hit region, reported 2,297 new confirmed COVID-19 cases in the last 24 hours, taking its total to 183,088.

As of Sunday, 304,808 people were under medical observation, while more than 10.9 million lab tests for COVID-19 have been conducted nationwide, Russia’s consumer rights and human well-being watchdog Rospotrebnadzor said in a statement Monday.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Health

Bayelsa seals 6 churches for breaching COVID-19 protocols

Published

on

The Bayelsa Government has sealed  six churches in the state for breaching ”operational protocols” required to conduct services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

News Agency of Nigeria reports that the state government on May 7,  relaxed its restriction on social gatherings and allowed churches to hold services with up to 50 worshipers.

The relaxation was granted, subject to compliance to strict conditions on provision of  hand washing facilities, wearing of face masks and observance of social distancing in the seating arrangements.

Mr Freston Akpor, Permanent Secretary, Bayelsa Ministry of Information, however, told NAN on Monday in Yenagoa,  that the Security Sub – Committee of the state’s Task Force on COVID- 19, sealed the churches during its surveillance on Sunday.

“The six churches were sealed for failure to comply with safety measures put in place by the government to contain the spread of the pandemic and protect the people of Bayelsa.

“The affected churches are,  Living Faith Church, Igbogene, Salvation Victory Centre, Igbogene, Shalom International Christian Centre, along Tombia-Amassoma road and Great Grace Distinguished Assembly, Okutukutu.

“Others are Brotherhood of the Cross and Star, Opolo and Hebrews International Church, Ayama road.

“The churches will remain sealed until further notice to serve as  deterrent  to other churches.

“The move will help in ensuring that other churches adhere to the protocols on hand washing, use of face masks and social distancing as measures to check the spread of the virus in the state,” Akpor said.

He said the security sub-committee of the task force on COVID-19,  unsealed two churches earlier shutdown for violating safety measures on the pandemic.

Akpor explained that the two churches , the Halleluya Deliverance Ministry International and Embassy Faith churches were unsealed after undertaken to comply with prescribed safety protocols.


Edited By: Chioma Ugboma/Sadiya Hamza (NAN)

 

Continue Reading

Foreign

New Zealand confirms no new case of COVID-19 for 10 consecutive days

Published

on

By

New Zealand reported no new case of COVID-19 on Monday for 10 consecutive days, with the combined total of confirmed and probable cases staying at 1,504, according to the Ministry of Health.

The total number of confirmed cases reported to the World Health Organization remained at 1,154, said a ministry statement.

The number of people who have recovered reached 1,481, with only one case remaining active, it said, and the number of COVID-19 related deaths remained at 22.

The NZ COVID Tracer app has now recorded 476,000 registrations, an increase of 8,000 on Sunday.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

1st LD Writethru: Armenian PM, family test positive for COVID-19

Published

on

By

Armenia’s Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan announced via Facebook on Monday that he and his family had tested positive for COVID-19.

Pashinyan said he did not have any symptoms and would continue to work from the prime minister’s residence.

“I will work from here as much as needed, but of course, under conditions of isolation,” he said.

The prime minister again urged citizens to always wear face masks and regularly disinfect hands.

The number of COVID-19 cases in the country reached 9,282 on Sunday, with 3,396 recoveries and 131 deaths, according to the Armenian government.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Spotlight: How would United States exit from WHO harm global fight against COVID-19?

Published

on

By

The U.S. exit from the World Health Organization (WHO) would undermine international efforts to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic that guarantee public health and save lives, officials and experts across the world have warned.

United States President Donald Trump said on Friday that his country is “terminating” its relationship with the WHO. The announcement came days after the White House, in a letter to WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, threatened to make the temporary freeze of United States funding “permanent” and reconsider its membership in the organization.

Experts have voiced concerns over the decision made by the United States government, saying the move is undermining the irreplaceable role of the WHO in coordinating global efforts in combating COVID-19 and delivering necessary aid to developing and particularly under-developed countries whose public health systems are very vulnerable.

For those countries which are still struggling with the rising COVID-19 cases and are highly dependent on the guidance, equipment and concrete life-saving services provided by the WHO, the U.S. funding freeze is no doubt a fatal shock, they said.

Dad Mohammad Annabi, an Afghan researcher and editor-in-chief of the Islah Daily, said: “Cutting more than 400 million United States dollars to the WHO definitely would undermine the global health agency’s performances including the war on COVID-19 and research on how to make a vaccine to cure the killing disease in the world.”

“Afghanistan is part of the international community and like other nations has been fighting COVID-19, and certainly a financial cut to the WHO would undermine the entity’s support to Afghanistan,” Annabi said.

Trump’s plan has also triggered widespread criticism from the international community, even from the traditional allies of the United States. The U.S. exit from the WHO is contrary to multilateralism and would disrupt global efforts to fight against the virus, especially those in vaccine development.

Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission, and Josep Borrell, the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, said in a statement that “the WHO needs to continue being able to lead the international response to pandemics, current and future.”

“For this, the participation and support of all is required and very much needed. In the face of this global threat, now is the time for enhanced cooperation and common solutions. Actions that weaken international results must be avoided,” they said in the statement.

“In this context, we urge the United States to reconsider its announced decision,” they said in the statement.

Irish Minister for Health Simon Harris described Trump’s plan to cut ties with the WHO as an “awful decision” on Twitter.

“Awful decision. Now more than ever the world needs multilateralism. A global pandemic requires the world to work together,” Harris tweeted.

Apart from criticism from the international community, Trump’s announcement also triggered disagreement across the United States. The country alone has reported more than 1.7 million COVID-19 cases with over 104,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University. Both figures are far higher than those in any other country or region.

Lawrence Gostin, a professor of global health law and director of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University, described the move as “foolish and arrogant” on Twitter.

“Trump’s action is an enormous disruption and distraction during an unprecedented health crisis,” said Gostin, also the director of the WHO collaborating center on national and global health law. “The President has made us less safe.”

Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia said that “the United States cannot eliminate this virus on its own and to withdraw from the World Health Organization — the world‘s leading public health body — is nothing short of reckless.”

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Armenian PM, family test positive for COVID-19

Published

on

By

Armenia’s Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan announced via Facebook on Monday that he and his family had tested positive for COVID-19.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Roundup: Life edges closer to normal as Aussie states ease COVID-19 restrictions

Published

on

By

Life for Australians in several major states edged closer to normal on Monday, with the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions on public gatherings and businesses after months of strict lockdowns.

Gatherings of up to 50 people were permitted once again, with restaurants and pubs being allowed to reopen, along with gyms, zoos, beauty salons, places of worship and other public institutions such as libraries and galleries.

While specific rules differed from state to state, with some only allowing gatherings of 20 people, the effect on thousands of businesses nationwide was significant and offered the return of a lifestyle similar to that of pre-COVID-19.

There were however rules for establishments to follow to prevent a second wave of infections, including allowing only one person per four square metres of space.

“We need to accept life will be different until we have an effective treatment or a vaccine,” New South Wales State Health Minister Brad Hazzard said.

“A simple tip advocated by health experts is to act as if you are infectious which will help you think twice about how you interact around others, as more restrictions are eased.”

With many domestic borders remaining closed despite discussions between state leaders, Aussies were urged to take a holiday closer to home and help reinvigorate the nation’s badly affected tourism industry.

State leaders encouraged their constituents to take the money they would normally spend overseas or interstate, and use it to support local businesses and attractions.

“In terms of our spend, we spend billions and billions on international or interstate travel each and every year,” Western Australia State Premier Mark McGowan said.

“This is the opportunity to spend all of that money right here in Western Australia, whether it is our magnificent regional communities or our great city places to spend your money.”

The easing of restrictions follows a significant drop in the number of new cases being recorded despite widespread testing.

On Monday, the aged care home which staged one of the country’s largest clusters was declared infection-free.

Nineteen residents died, with 37 residents and 34 staff testing positive for the virus at the nursing home during the outbreak, which began in mid-April after a member of staff worked six shifts with mild COVID-19 symptoms.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Mongolia confirms 6 new COVID-19 cases, 185 in total

Published

on

By

Mongolia reported six new cases of COVID-19 over the last 24 hours, bringing the national count to 185, the country’s National Center for Communicable Disease (NCCD) said Monday.

“A total of 371 tests for COVID-19 were conducted in the country yesterday and six of them were positive,” NCCD head Dulmaa Nyamkhuu told a daily press conference.

The new patients are Mongolian nationals who returned home from Russia on May 15, said Nyamkhuu.

All the COVID-19 cases in Mongolia were imported, mostly from Russia. Among them, a total of 44 patients, including four foreigners, have recovered.

No local transmissions or deaths have been reported in the Asian country so far.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

India reports highest daily spike of 8,392 COVID-19 cases as total reach 190,535

Published

on

By

India’s federal health ministry Monday morning reported 230 new deaths due to COVID-19 and 8,392 more positive cases during the past 24 hours across the country, taking the number of deaths to 5,394 and total cases to 190,535.

This was so far the highest single-day spike in the cases.

According to officials, 91,819 people have been discharged from hospitals after showing improvement.

“The number of active cases in the country right now is 93,322,” reads the information.

The fifth phase of the nationwide lockdown came into force from Monday, making several relaxations and reopening in a phased manner.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced a nationwide lockdown On March 25 to contain the spread of COVID-19 and break the chain of infection.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also