Connect with us

General news

VAR under spotlight again as Cameroon fume over offside calls

Published

on

Cameroon’s players made little effort to hide their rage against the Video Assistant Referee (VAR) during their FIFA Women’s World Cup last 16 match against England on Sunday.

The players’ rage justifiably heightened after Phil Neville’s side scored their second goal in their 3-0 win at Valenciennes in France.

The Lionesses, who had gone ahead through Steph Houghton’s close range free kick, had a goal by Ellen White disallowed for offside at the end of the first half.

But it was quickly given following a VAR review, prompting dramatic scenes.

Incensed by the decision, Cameroon’s players appeared to almost refuse to restart the game as they argued with the referee, pointing to the screen in the stadium which showed the replay.

Cameroon coach Alain Djeumfa stepped in to calm his players before they kicked off and the game went to half-time.

VAR again proved to be an annoyance for the African team as they scored through Ajara Nchout early in the second half.

The goal was soon to be disallowed for offside following a review, leaving the forward close to tears amid more protests.

OLAL

(Edited by Olawale Alabi)

General news

Ondo varsity says no staff tested positive for COVID-19

Published

on

The management of Olusegun Agagu University of Science and Technolog (OAUSTECH), Okitipupa, Ondo State, on Friday debunked the rumour that an administrative staff of the institution tested positive for COVID-19.

The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the rumour had caused panic among residents of Okitipupa and environs.

In a statement in Okitipupa, Mr Idowu Omowole, the institution’s Registry Coordinator, described  the report as fake and baseless.

He said the  management had conducted an investigation into the matter and found out that  none of the university‘a administrative staff tested positive for the disease.

Omowole noted that the institution on March 20 directed all its staff and students to vacate the campus in line with the state government’s order, to curtail the spread of new coronavirus.

“Our attention has been drawn to fake news flying around that an administrative staff of the institution tested positive for COVID-19.

“The fake news has caused panic in Okitipupa and environs.

“The management of the university wishes to inform the general public that a thorough investigation has been conducted and no staff tested positive for the deadly virus.

“We advise the public to disregard and treat the information as fake and go about their lawful duties, obey and observe all government precautionary measures to fight the deadly virus,” Omowole said.


Edited By: Folorunso Poroye (NAN)Ijeoma Popoola

Continue Reading

Education

UNIPORT clarifies status of Prof. Regina Ogali in new varsity appointment

Published

on

The University of Port Harcourt (UNIPORT) on Friday clarified that Prof. Regina Ogali, Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration) was not appointed acting Vice Chancellor of the institution.

A statement by Dr Williams Wodi, the Deputy Registrar (Information) clarified that Ogali was directed to hold brief for the institution’s Vice Chancellor Prof. Ndowa Lale, who proceeds on compulsory leave on June 12.

He said: “The Federal Government directed the outgoing Vice Chancellor of UNIPORT, Prof. Ndowa Lale to hand over the affairs of the university to Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration), Prof. Regina Ogali.

“Ogali will oversee the affairs of the university pending the appointment of a substantive Vice Chancellor.

“A letter from the Federal Ministry of Education dated may 29 directed Ogali to oversee the affairs of UNIPORT while the incumbent Vice Chancellor, Prof. Lale proceeds on his leave from June 12.

The university spokesman said the letter was signed on behalf of the Minister of Education, Malam Adamu Adamu by the Permanent Secretary in the Federal Ministry of Education, Sonny Echono.

“The letter authorised Lale to hand over the affairs of the institution to the Ogali, who shall oversee the affairs of the institution until a substantive Vice Chancellor is appointed.

“The permanent secretary, on behalf of the minister wished Lale well in his future endeavours following his successful tenure in office as the 8th vice chancellor of UNIPORT,” he said.


Edited By: Felix Ajide (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Urgent: Burundian court confirms Evariste Ndayishimiye’s victory in presidential election

Published

on

By

Burundian constitutional court on Thursday said it approved the results of last month’s presidential election, declaring ruling party’s presidential candidate Evariste Ndayishimiye as the president-elect.

The court also rejected the first runner-up’s complaints filed to the court, which challenged the provisional results announced on May 25.

The provisional results released by the National Independent Electoral Commission showed Ndayishimiye from the ruling National Council for the Defense of Democracy-Forces for the Defense of Democracy won 68.72 percent of votes in the presidential election, followed by National Council for Liberty’s Agathon Rwasa who got 24.19 percent of votes.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Education

Stakeholders advocate research management in Nigerian varsities for national development 

Published

on

Stakeholders in the education sector have stressed the importance of research management development in Nigerian universities as a tool for promoting national development.

According to the stakeholders, it will also ensure realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Prof. Ayodele Jegede, the Director, University of Ibadan Research Management Office (UI RMO) disclosed this in a statement in Ibadan on Wednesday.

Jegede in his reflection on the 10th anniversary of RMO as well as well as its achievements, said the help of collaborators was also worthy of note.

Also speaking, Prof. Idowu Olayinka, the Vice Chancellor, University of Ibadan (UI), eulogised the pivotal role of RMO in the development of the institution and how it had opened a new chapter for the institution.

UI will professionalise research management in order to open up job opportunities in research administration.

“The university will digitise the research management system in order to ensure that the institution remains the choice brand for cutting-edge multinational institutional research collaborations.

“Considering the role of research in national development, government should channel resources to research management.

“As a properly organised research management system is a necessary condition for a nation to maximise the opportunities in the fourth industrial revolution and knowledge based economy.”

Also, Prof. Olufemi Bamiro, a former Vice Chancellor of the university, noted that multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary researches were veritable tools to address national development initiatives.

He, however, stressed the importance of the triple helix which involves government-academia-industry partnership as a powerful tool for achieving socio-economic development of nations.

“With the government facilitating the flow of research-driven knowledge and innovation from universities to the industrial space, the power of the triple helix toward the building of industrial competitiveness with the centrality of academia -universities and polytechnics – is illustrated by the case of Tshumisano Trust Agency of South Africa.

“This is being done through its funding of research-driven innovation for transfer to the target industrial sectors to improve competitiveness.

“Under the programme, universities and technicians in polytechnics are challenged by the government with industrial problems with research-driven solutions deployed to the relevant Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs).

“In a continual process of increasing the industrial competitiveness of these actors, significant results are being achieved under the scheme,” he said.

Bamiro said that there were a great number of researches from Nigerian universities that litter the system proudly displayed in research fairs with no takers to commercialise them.

He added that maximising the triple helix was the way forward and toward relevance of universities and problem solving.


Edited By: Edwin Nwachukwu/Ese E. Ekama (NAN)

Continue Reading

Science & Technology

Gregory varsity student designs hybrid fuel-less power generator — Official

Published

on

Mr Prayer Nwojoyi, a student of Electrical Electronics in the College of Engineering, Gregory University Uturu (GUU), in Abia has designed and produced a prototype of a hybrid fuel-less electricity generating machine.
Mr Sleek Ogwo, the university’s Principal Assistant Registrar/Head, Media and Public Relations, made this known in a statement issued to newsmen in Umuahia on Tuesday.
Ogwo stated, “The
prototype is a 3KVA, dual-battery generator that requires neither solar power nor combustive material to generate electricity.”
According to him, the prototype design was presented to the Vice-Chancellor (VC), of GUU, Prof. Augustine Uwakwe, by the Dean, College of Engineering, Dr Soccis Okoli.
Ogwo
stated that “Uwakwe applauded the college for the innovation,” and gave the assurance that the university remained committed to solving problems through innovations.
“Uwakwe noted that the generator is another contribution of the College of Engineering towards combating the Coronavirus pandemic and cushioning its effect on the populace,” he stated.
The university’s spokesman further quoted the VC to have said that the institution had braced to the challenges posed by the pandemic and was poised to proffer solutions.
“Uwakwe stated that the invention of a fuel-less electricity generator will ensure the provision of uninterrupted, cost-free power supply to the masses,” Ogwo added.
He also quoted Uwakwe to have opined that the generator would help to mitigate some of the harsh effects of the COVID-19 lockdown.
Also, the dean of the college, was quoted to have described the generator as different from those in the market.
“Okoli said that the department is ready to mass produce and market the product.
“He also said that the generator is safe, cost-friendly and requires zero-input or maintenance after installation.
“In addition, it is a zero-emission generator which makes it eco-friendly,” the statement added.
Nwojoyi, the inventor, was said to have highlighted some of the features of the generator, which included “dual self-sustaining 12 volts 6 amp batteries that power the plant alternately, while also charging itself.
“According to the young innovator, ‘the machine has an automatic change-over that turns it on and off, thereby allowing instant change-over once an alternative power source comes on or off.’
“This eliminates idle-time and need for human intervention to change-over,” Ogwo stated.
He further quoted Nwojoyi to have explained that “all the materials used in the design and construction were sourced locally.”
Ogwo stated that Nwojoyi is a former winner of an annual NTA Network Programme competition for Junior Scientists.

The competition was sponsored by Prof. Gregory Ibe, the Chancellor of the university and Managing Director of Skill ‘G’ Nig. Ltd, a frontline education development company.


Edited By: Donald Ugwu (NAN)

Continue Reading

Agriculture

Climate change: AFAN advises members on improved seeds variety

Published

on

The  All Farmers Association of Nigeria (AFAN) in Adamawa  on Tuesday advised  members to cultivate  improved variety of seeds that grow within short time, going by the current situation of climate change.

Usman Michika, Chairman of  AFAN in the state who gave the advice on behalf of the association during an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria  in Yola, said  improved varieties produced more yields.

The association said it was doing its best in educating members on how to improve their production and  profits at the end of the season.

It called on members to avoid farming on cattle routes and  grazing  reserves to avert clashes with herdsmen.

It  also advised them not to allow their farm produce to overstay in the  farms to avoid any clash.

According to the association , farmers are facing challenges of kidnappers and sometimes clashes between members and herders.

It called on governments to set up a committee  at the state, local government  and  community level  to check the frequent clashes between  farmers and herders.


Edited By: Vivian Ihechu (NAN)

Continue Reading

Agriculture

New KWASU VC repositions varsity on agriculture

Published

on

Prof. Muhammad Mustapha-Akanbi (SAN), the new Vice-Chancellor, Kwara University (KWASU), Malete, on Monday pledged to make the institution a major player in agro-allied businesses.

He stated this at a media briefing at Malete, which coincided with a month of his assumption of office as the second vice-chancellor of the institution.

According to him, the university will support Kwara and Nigeria to become self-sufficient in food production by eliminating poverty and hunger in the society.

Mustapha-Akanbi said the university would achieve this objective through massive planting of grains, especially maize at its Baruten and Ekiti Campuses.

The vice-chancellor noted that the Faculty of Agriculture’s Demonstration Farms at the main campus would be given the necessary logistics to meet the intended purpose.

“Our universities must be big players in ensuring food sufficiency in the country.

“We have established KWASU Investments and Consultancy Unit with the mandate to ensure that our institution becomes a big player in agro-allied businesses.

“We have land and the expertise. We shall be producing day-old chicks in such quantity that will be difficult to match,” he said.

The don pledged to improve on the existing collaborative efforts he met on ground with a view to making the university a world class institution.

“I met a lot of collaborative efforts. I already have a solid footing. I shall build on this.

“We will think global and act local in ensuring that KWASU becomes a first class institution,” he promised.

Mustapha-Akanbi, who disclosed that the university’s Law programme had been accr
Edited By: the (NAN) National Universities Commission(NUC), noted that the institution was only awaiting accreditation by the Legal Education Council.

He thanked Gov. AbdulRahman AbdulRazaq for approving N17 million for the university for the purpose of accrediting its Law programme.

The News Agency of Nigeria reports that Mustapha-Akanbi was appointed the second vice-chancellor of the 11-year-old institution by the governor on May 1, 2020.

He succeeded Prof. AbdulRasheed Na’Allah, who is now the Vice-Chancellor, University of Abuja.

BEKl/


Edited By: Folorunso Poroye/Muhammad Suleiman Tola (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Kenyan farmers grapple with oscillating temperatures as climate varies

Published

on

After floods, due to heavy rains, killed at least 285 people and destroyed hundreds of acres of crops between April and May in Kenya, farmers have started to feel another pinch of climate variability.

Night and day-time temperatures in different parts of the east African nation are oscillating between too high and too low, affecting crop production.

Areas that are worst-hit include those around the capital Nairobi and in the neighbouring central and eastern regions, where most food consumed in the city is grown.

Data from the meteorological department shows that temperatures in Nairobi and surrounding areas are currently rising to a high of 27 degrees Celsius during the day and falling at night to 14 degrees Celsius, from day temperature average of 24 degrees Celsius and night 20 degrees Celsius in the past.

The fluctuation in temperatures is hurting crops, with horticultural and coffee farmers feeling much of the heat.

For tomato farmers, especially those growing the crop in the field, the cold temperatures at night have given rise to an increase in blight disease, which is destroying plants and fruits.

The increase in disease means that farmers have to spend more money on chemicals and spraying the crops pushing up the cost of production.

“Blight has become a major problem currently, especially among farmers growing tomatoes, strawberries, capsicum, chilli, potatoes and cucumbers.

The cold weather disease is attacking crops and farmers have been forced to dig deeper into their pockets to take curative measures,’’ said Beatrice Macharia of Growth Point, an agro-consultancy in Kajiado County, south of Nairobi.

The county is one of the biggest sources of food for the capital Nairobi, with most of the farmers growing crops under irrigation.

“Blight attacks leaves forming circular brown lesions and they then turn yellow and fall off.

For tomatoes, the fruits have brown marks and the inside becomes watery as they shrink,’’ she said, noting that most of the inquiries she is currently receiving are virtually about the disease.

Macharia observed that one has to spray crops like potatoes, coffee, tomatoes, eggplant and capsicum with chemicals at least twice every week when the temperatures are too low lest they die due to bacterial blight.

In the past, a cold weather would set in the east African nation in July and end in August, but for the last two years, climate variability has seen the chilly spell start in May and last over two months, giving farmers a hard time.

Chicken, goats and cattle farmers also have to contend with the cold spell that leads to rise in coccidiosis and pneumonia, which affects livestock.

Cold weather normally leads to increased cost of production because a farmer has to rely on supplemental heat, which can be from electricity or charcoal to keep the birds warmer.

Macharia noted that the variation of climate is making farming a little harder as animals and crops struggle to adjust to the infrequent weather patterns that oscillate from heavy rains, dry spell and a colder period in just a few months.

AIB

Edited By: Abdulfatah Babatunde (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Kenyan farmers grapple with oscillating temperatures as climate varies

Published

on

By

After floods due to heavy rains killed at least 285 people and destroyed hundreds of acres of crops between April and May in Kenya, farmers have started to feel another pinch of climate variability.

Night and day-time temperatures in different parts of the east African nation are oscillating between too high and too low, affecting crop production.

Areas that are worst-hit include those around the capital Nairobi and in the neighboring central and eastern regions, where most food consumed in the city is grown.

Data from the meteorological department shows that temperatures in Nairobi and surrounding areas are currently rising to a high of 27 degrees Celsius during the day and falling at night to 14 degrees Celsius, from day temperature average of 24 degrees Celsius and night 20 degrees Celsius in the past.

The fluctuation in temperatures is hurting crops, with horticultural and coffee farmers feeling much of the heat.

For tomato farmers, especially those growing the crop in the field, the cold temperatures at night have given rise to an increase in blight disease, which is destroying the plant and the fruits.

The increase in disease means that farmers have to spend more money on chemicals and spraying the crops pushing up the cost of production.

“Blight has become a major problem currently especially among farmers growing tomatoes, strawberries, capsicum, chilli, potatoes and cucumbers. The cold weather disease is attacking crops and farmers have been forced to dig deeper into their pockets to take curative measures,” said Beatrice Macharia of Growth Point, an agro-consultancy in Kajiado County, south of Nairobi.

The county is one of the biggest sources of food for the capital Nairobi, with most of the farmers growing crops under irrigation.

“Blight attacks leaves forming circular brown lesions and they then turn yellow and fall off. For tomatoes, the fruits have brown marks and the inside becomes watery as they shrink,” she said, noting that most of the inquiries she is currently receiving virtually are about the disease.

Macharia observed that one has to spray crops like potatoes, coffee, tomatoes, eggplant and capsicum with chemicals at least twice every week when the temperatures are too low lest they die due to bacterial blight.

In the past, a cold weather would set in the east African nation in July and end in August, but for the last two years, climate variability has seen the chilly spell start in May and last over two months, giving farmers a hard time.

Chicken, goats and cattle farmers also have to contend with the cold spell that leads to rise in coccidiosis and pneumonia, which affects livestock.

Cold weather normally leads to increased cost of production because a farmer has to rely on supplemental heat which can be from electricity or charcoal to keep the birds warmer.

Macharia noted that the variation of climate is making farming a little harder as animals and crops struggle to adjust to the infrequent weather patterns that oscillate from heavy rains, dry spell and a colder period in just a few months.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Read Also