Connect with us

Foreign

Wisconsin governor, Evers delays election over coronavirus outbreak

Published

on

  

Less than 24 hours before polls were set to open in Wisconsin, the governor of the Midwestern U.S. state issued an executive order on Monday postponing the election, which included balloting for the Democratic Party’s presidential primary.

The move by Gov. Tony Evers to hold off on in-person voting until June 9 comes as the state legislature refuses calls to take action and protect public safety, amid the coronavirus pandemic and despite Wisconsin being under stay-at-home orders.

More than a dozen other states are postponing primaries or switching to voting-by-mail because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Evers, a Democrat, tried over the weekend to persuade the Republican-led legislative bodies to cancel in-person voting, but failed.

Two members of the Wisconsin Elections Commission on Sunday denounced the legislature’s refusal to budge, saying that forcing an in-person election “not only threatens the voters, the clerks, and election staff, it threatens everyone those people subsequently come into contact with.”

In the letter, they also noted there was a severe shortage of poll workers.

The election will include a vote on a state Supreme Court judge, a key race for the Republicans.

Former vice president Joe Biden has a solid lead in the delegate count and polling shows him ahead of left-wing Senator Bernie Sanders in the Democratic race to become the centre-left party’s candidate to face President Donald Trump in November.

Sanders last week urged Wisconsin to delay its primary, while Biden has not issued such a call.

YEE

Edited By: Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Emmanuel Yashim: is a graduate and a professionally trained journalist, with experience in national news reporting/editing and verification at the News Agency of Nigeria. NNN is a Nigerian online news portal that publishes breaking news in Nigeria, and across the world. Our journalists are honest, fair, accurate, thorough and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting news in the best interest of the public, because truth is the cornerstone of journalism and they strive diligently to ascertain the truth in every news report. Contact: editor[at]nnn.com.ng

Foreign

Trump lauds Wisconsin court for striking down lockdown order 

Published

on

U.S. President Donald Trump on Thursday praised the Wisconsin Supreme Court’s recent decision to strike down the Democratic governor’s stay-at-home order.

Wisconson’s “Democrat governor was forced by the courts to let the state open.

“The people want to get on with their lives. The place is bustling!” Trump wrote in a tweet.

Trump has increasingly urged states to quickly proceed with reopening their economies, despite warnings from top public health officials that the country could face a second wave of the novel coronavirus if lockdown orders are eased too quickly.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court, which is controlled by a conservative majority, sided with Republican legislators on Wednesday in striking down Gov. Tony Ever’s statewide order.

Evers said the decision has thrown “Wisconsin into chaos, putting public health and lives at serious risk.”

Local county-wide orders in Wisconsin’s major population centres remain in effect.

Meanwhile, local media reported that bars in Wisconsin immediately filled with patrons on Wednesday evening once the order was struck down.

Protests have increased against lockdown orders around the nation, while polling show a majority of Americans still support the public health recommendations.

On Thursday, armed protesters gathered again at Michigan’s state capitol building, where Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s strict stay-at-home orders have catalysed opposition.

At least one Michigan state lawmaker donned a bulletproof vest on Thursday, according to local media reports, as legislators and law enforcement debate their ability to ban weapons on capitol building grounds.

Much of the divisions about lockdown orders are taking place along partisan lines, with largely rural and Republican leaders saying strict lockdown measures should not apply to their communities.

In California, Gov. Gavin Newsom warned of grave economic consequences of the coronavirus fallout as his state faces a projected 53.4-billion-dollar budget fallout.

The governor said the state needed Congress to legislate new relief monies, while a revised state budget he presented on Thursday proposes a 10-per-cent pay cut to all state employees.

He said the California’s unemployment rate may reach 25 per cent.

“This pandemic is bigger than any one state, it’s bigger than any nation,” Newsom added.

Edited By: Emmanuel Yashim (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Wisconsin man accused of sending manifesto to Trump arrested after manhunt

Published

on

A Wisconsin man accused of stealing an arsenal of weapons from a gun shop and sending an anti-government manifesto to President Donald Trump has been arrested after a massive manhunt.

The Rock County Sheriff’s Office said, Joseph Jakubowski, 32, was taken into custody on Friday morning after being located overnight in Southwest Wisconsin, where he appeared to be camping in a rural area.

The sheriff said in a statement that a force of 150 law enforcement personnel, including Federal Bureau of Investigation agents, were searching for the suspect as of last weekend, authorities said.

The weeks-long hunt for Jakubowski was triggered by an April 4 break-in at a gun shop called Armageddon Supplies in the suspect’s hometown of Janesville, about 70 miles (113 km) southwest of Milwaukee.

The theft netted 18 guns and two silencers, said a criminal complaint filed in the Rock County Wisconsin Circuit Court in Janesville, Wisconsin.

A 161-page manifesto he mailed to Trump criticized officials from all levels of government and contained “anti-religious views,” according to investigators on the case.

A video posted to social media appears to show Jakubowski mailing the manifesto.

He was taken into custody without incident hours after a farmer called the Vernon County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday night to report a suspicious person on his property in Readstown, Wisconsin.

Authorities were making arrangements to return him to Rock County to face charges.

Jakubowski is charged with armed burglary, felony theft and possession of burglary tools, according to the complaint.

He previously served time in prison for trying to wrestle a gun away from a police officer.

According to court documents, his sister also found a letter he wrote before the break-in at the gun shop, explaining that he wanted to purchase weapons to protect himself and his family, but was barred from doing so because he is a convicted felon.

SH

Continue Reading

Foreign

U.S. votes recount: Stein concludes filing for Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania

Published

on

The campaign of Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein has filed a request for a recount of nearly 4.8 million ballots cast for president in Michigan.

Mark Brewer, the Michigan-based attorney representing Stein, filed the recount request at the Board of Elections office in Lansing with several other attorneys representing the campaign.

The Nigeria News Agency recalls that Stein had raised about 6.7 million dollars since her announcement last week to contest the presidential election result and seek recounts of Donald Trump’s election victories in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

Her effort for a Pennsylvania recount is on as her lawyer, Lawrence Otter, filed a lawsuit in Harrisburg’s Commonwealth Court at 3 p.m. on Monday, asking for a full recount of every Pennsylvania County.

She had also filed a petition on Friday last week with the Wisconsin State’s Election Commission, just 90 minutes before Wisconsin’s 5 p.m. Friday deadline to file a petition.

There have been concerns over the credibility of the election that saw Democratic Hillary Clinton, who won the popular votes by about two million, losing to Trump, who won the presidency based on Electoral College vote.

Brewer brought along a cheque for 973,250 dollars, which represents the 125 dollars per precinct Stein must pay for the recount.

“I and the undersigned members of my slate of electors are aggrieved on account of fraud or mistake in the canvass of the votes by the inspectors of election.

“And/or the returns made by the inspectors and/or by the Board of County Canvassers and/or by the Board of State Canvassers.

“I request that all of the precincts and absent voter counting board precincts within the state of Michigan be recounted by hand count,” Stein said in her request.

A recount could begin as soon as Friday in the state’s largest 19 counties, followed by the smaller counties, with a goal of finishing the state-wide recount by Dec. 10.

Lou Novak, a member of the Green Party and Detroit resident, commended the recount efforts during a news conference after the recount request was filed.

“This recount is about millions of ordinary Americans across the nation who are raising up to say enough is enough. Today is a turning point to fix our democracy.”

Alex Halderman, a cybersecurity expert and computer science professor at the University of Michigan, said researchers had shown that Michigan’s optical scan machines could be hacked.

Halderman, however, said there is no evidence that they have been hacked in previous elections.

He said: “America’s voting technology unfortunately suffers from severe cyber security vulnerabilities.

“We have one sure-fire defense against cyber attack and that’s voting machines in which voters can fill out a paper ballot. But the paper doesn’t do any good unless someone looks at it”.

John Pirich, a Lansing-based attorney with Honigman Miller and one of the attorneys hired by the Trump campaign, also was on hand for the filing.

Pirich said he still had to review the recount request before determining what, if any, action would be taken.

The State Board of Canvassers had scheduled a 9:30 a.m. meeting on Friday to deal with any challenges to the recount, if any are filed.

The board certified the Nov. 8 election results on Monday, showing that Republican Donald Trump won the state with a total of 2,279,543 votes, which was 10,704 more than Democrat Hillary Clinton received.

Stein finished fourth in the presidential race with 51,463 votes.

Brewer acknowledged that he did not expect a recount to change the outcome of the election adding, the purpose is to investigate if there is any evidence of mistakes or fraud happening during the counting of the ballots.

Secretary of State Ruth Johnson had estimated could cost as much as two million dollars, less the 973,250 dollars coming from Stein, and the rest paid by the state’s 83 counties.

Johnson said it is unusual for a candidate who received only 1.07% of the presidential vote in Michigan to request a recount, “especially when there is no evidence of hacking or fraud, or even a credible allegation of any tampering.”

“Nevertheless, county clerks have been gearing up to complete this recount under a very challenging deadline.

“They’ll be working nights and weekends. I know they will do a great job because we have some of the best clerks in the country here in Michigan,” she said.

Even though the outcome is unlikely to change, Johnson said the state and county clerks were gearing up for an unprecedented state-wide recount.

Stein had said she had no evidence of fraud going into a recount of ballots in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan, but wanted to ensure the integrity of the election.

She has raised 6.7 million dollars in crowd-funding to pay for the recounts in the three states.

Ronna McDaniel, chairwoman of the Michigan Republican Party, said the recount was a waste of taxpayer dollars.

She said: “The filing by Jill Stein is a reckless attempt to undermine the will of Michigan voters.

“Jill Stein made her one per cent temper tantrum official and will waste millions of Michigan taxpayers’ dollars and has acknowledged that the recount will not change anything regarding the Presidential election.” 

Edited by: Julius Enehikhuere
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

US poll: Wisconsin Elections Commission ready for recount

Published

on

A request for a recount of Wisconsin’s presidential vote was on Friday filed with the Wisconsin Elections Commission in Madison, commencing processes for the recount of Nov. 8 presidential votes in the state.

Wisconsin Elections Commission administrator Mike Haas confirmed on Friday that the commission had received the recount petitions by Green Party’s presidential nominee in the election, Jill Stein.

“The Commission is preparing to move forward with a state-wide recount of votes for president of the United States, as requested by these candidates,” Haas confirmed.

The Commission also confirmed on its website that it “has received the Stein and Del la Fuente recount petitions. Details and news release posted soon.”

The Nigeria News Agency reports that the deadline for filing a recount petition for Wisconsin was at 5p.m. on Friday while the Federal deadline for the recount is Dec. 13.

NAN also reports that there have been concerns over the credibility of the election in the battleground states where Hillary Clinton lost to Donald Trump by about one per cent.

The concerns have also heightened recently as Clinton’s lead over Trump in popular votes has surpassed two million as additional votes are being counted in the presidential election.

Petitions were filed by Stein and from Rocky Roque De La Fuente for the Wisconsin recount, while Stein is also pushing for a recount in Michigan and Pennsylvania.

Already, the commission said it had prepared its staff for the recount when it was informed on Wednesday by Stein Campaign that it was filing for votes recount.

Elections Supervisor of Wisconsin, Ross Hein, had sent a memo over the votes recount to Wisconsin County Clerks and Milwaukee County Election Commission since Wednesday.

WEC staff has been informed that the Jill Stein campaign for President of the United States is going to request a statewide recount.

On Friday afternoon Green Party member George Martin said the party acted after alerts from elections experts, who saw what they call “statistical anomalies” in Wisconsin’s vote totals and discrepancies with exit poll numbers.

“We are not doing this to the benefit of one candidate over the other. We’re doing this for the benefit of the American public so we can trust that our votes are counted,” Martin said

However, Wisconsin Elections Commission has said that hacking would be close to impossible.

“Voting equipment is not connected to the Internet, and we emphasise that all the time, that would mean that someone would have to have physical access to the voting equipment.

“And more than that, they would essentially have to break into a locked storage unit on the voting equipment,” Haas, the Wisconsin Election Commission administrator, said.

The Green Party has raised more than five million dollars, exceeding its targeted 4.5 million dollars, and is now moving toward a seven million dollars goal to also cover recounts in Pennsylvania and Michigan.

NAN recalls that Trump had won the Nov. 8 presidential election based on Electoral College while Clinton, who lost the election, led Trump by over two million popular votes as at Wednesday.

APT/

Continue Reading

Foreign

Trump warns he may move Republican convention site from North Carolina

Published

on

U.S. President Donald Trump warns that he may move the Republican National Convention from North Carolina set for August if the event faces state social distancing restrictions as a result of the coronavirus.

The coronavirus pandemic has forced Trump and presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden to halt campaign rallies.

Some have raised concerns that the large formal nominating conventions that are typically packed with delegates could raise safety issues.

Trump said on Twitter that if Democratic Governor Roy Cooper does not immediately answer “whether or not the space will be allowed to be fully occupied,” then the party will find “with all of the jobs and economic development it brings, another Republican National Convention site.”

The conventions include prime-time TV speeches that serve to kick off the final sprint toward the November presidential election.

The Republican event is set to start Aug. 24 in Charlotte.

Cooper’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The Democratic National Convention, which was postponed by a month because of the coronavirus, is set to begin Aug. 17 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

A spokeswoman for the DNC event said earlier this month “we continue to remain in constant communication with federal, state, and local public health officials and will follow their guidance to determine how many people can safely gather in Milwaukee this August.”

Edited By: Emmanuel Okara/Isaac Aregbesola (NAN)

 

 

Continue Reading

Foreign

Opinion: Post-pandemic world needs better globalization, not less

Published

on

Even at a time when the coronavirus pandemic is sweeping the world, beef from New Zealand, red wine from Chile, and detergent from Germany remain just a click away to Chinese customers.

This offers a glimpse of how globalization has led to the creation of a highly integrated world web of interdependence and altered the way of living in many parts of this closely connected global community.

The ravaging pandemic, however, has jolted global supply chains and halted much of cross-border travels. It has also exposed once again some of globalization’s deep-seated deficiencies, and prompted many in academia, politics and the press to debate whether this marks the beginning of an end to this historic process.

It is not the first time that globalization has been questioned or assaulted in times of turbulence. Between the 2008 global financial crisis and this pandemic, sharp criticism against globalization was heard fueled by rising waves of trade protectionism and economic nationalism.

Thousands of demonstrators take part in a rally in Reykjavik, capital of Iceland, calling on the government to resign for the national financial crisis, Nov. 15, 2008. (Xinhua/Guo Lei)

Thousands of demonstrators take part in a rally in Reykjavik, capital of Iceland, calling on the government to resign for the national financial crisis, Nov. 15, 2008. (Xinhua/Guo Lei)

Nevertheless, being a natural process driven by the combined forces of technological breakthroughs, as well as the free flow of people and profit-thirsty capital, globalization has brought down trade and commerce barries, shrunk production costs, stimulated technological cooperation, integrated global markets and financial systems, created inestimable jobs and wealth, and raised living standards throughout the world over the centuries since the Age of Discovery.

These upsides of globalization are unmistakable, and will not be wiped out by a single global crisis. Arjun Appadurai, a U.S. globalization studies expert, argued in an opinion piece published by the Time magazine earlier this month that “globalization is here to stay,” and de-globalization efforts are no more than “wishful thinking.”

Thus the international community, instead of trying to turn inward and break away from each other, should come even closer and make globalization work better for everyone.

Pedestrians’ silhouettes are seen at the Apple store inside the Grand Central Terminal in New York, the United States, Nov. 30, 2017. (Xinhua/Li Muzi)

Pedestrians’ silhouettes are seen at the Apple store inside the Grand Central Terminal in New York, the United States, Nov. 30, 2017. (Xinhua/Li Muzi)

Pedestrians’ silhouettes

The first task should be for countries worldwide to make global production and supply chains more risk-resilient. This pandemic will not be the last one. Other unknown risks and new challenges are likely to emerge in the future.

While some Washington politicians are talking about reshoring the production of critical medical and technological supplies back to the United States, others like Shannon K. O’Neil, a senior fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations, argued that governments and boardrooms should add redundancies to the global manufacturing processes.

Information technologies have also been considered key to rendering future global supply chains more resilient. The World Economic Forum (WEF) suggested in an article published on its website last month that companies should stop recording data like ships’ cargo on paper, and start digitizing their supply chain processes so as to make sure critical information can always be available.

Whatever the proposals — reshoring, multi-sourcing or digitizing, China, with its comprehensive industrial advantages, will remain a critical part of any future global supply chains.

“I don’t think China‘s role as a major source of manufacturing is going to be eliminated. They will continue to be so,” said Morris Cohen, a professor at The Wharton School, told Deutsche Welle last month.

Photo taken on Jan. 7, 2020 shows China-produced sedans at Tesla’s gigafactory in Shanghai, east China. (Xinhua/Ding Ting)

Photo taken on Jan. 7, 2020 shows China-produced sedans at Tesla’s gigafactory in Shanghai, east China.

(Xinhua/Ding Ting)

Secondly, the international community should jointly enhance global economic governance and further boost global free trade.

In mid-April, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) projected that the global economy is on track to contract sharply by 3 percent in 2020 due to COVID-19, probably the worst recession since the Great Depression in the 1930s.

To forestall that nightmare scenario, governments should at the moment better coordinate their macro-economic policies so as to maintain market stability, prop up employment, conduct stimuli proportional to the ongoing pandemic, and restore global growth through such multilateral economic platforms as the Group of 20.

Also, they should give even stronger support to the rules-based multilateral trading system with the World Trade Organization (WTO) at the core. Right now, because of Washington’s intentional obstruction, the WTO’s Appellate Body, which has arbitrated international trade disputes over the past 25 years to ensure fairness, has been left inquorate.

Photo taken on April 12, 2018 shows the abbreviation WTO on the wall of the World Trade Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. (Xinhua/Xu Jinquan)

Photo taken on April 12, 2018 shows the abbreviation WTO on the wall of the World Trade Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. (Xinhua/Xu Jinquan)

The Financial Times, a British newspaper, argued in a recent editorial that the WTO is needed more than ever so that it can “underpin the open global economy we will all need on the other side of the pandemic.”

The U.S. administration should curb its protectionist impulses, and actively and fully back the existing global economic governance system.

The third front should be strengthening international cooperation so that countries worldwide can better respond to their shared non-conventional security challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Globalization is now far more than just economic integration. As the global village is highly interconnected, the human race needs to ramp up, not to dial down, trans-border cooperation in a bid to jointly tackle common challenges like deadly contagions, climate change, terrorism and cyber attacks, problems no country can solve single-handedly.

The most immediate mission should be stepping up global cooperation against the COVID-19 pandemic and bolster the backbone-role the World Health Organization has been playing in coordinating global endeavor to beat humanity’s common enemy.

The fourth task is to make globalization more inclusive for all. The pandemic has further revealed that globalization has not turned out to be a rising tide lifting all boats, and that it could further widen the global gap between the rich and the poor.

In a WEF research report earlier this month, which focuses on epidemics like H1N1 in 2009, MERS in 2012, and Zika in 2016, and traces out their distributional effects in the five years following each event, the Gini coefficient, a commonly-used index of inequality, has gone up by nearly 1.5 percent on average.

In the United States, the world‘s largest economy, the outbreak recession has kicked millions of the most economically vulnerable Americans out of their jobs, while many are facing a dire choice between protecting their health or their jobs. Also, several racial minority groups account for a disproportionate number of the COVID-19 infections and deaths in the country largely due to lower living and working conditions as well as a lack of access to health care. In Wisconsin alone, a U.S. state with a 6-percent Black population, African Americans account for about half of its outbreak fatalities, according to a recent report by the Washington Post.

A man rides bicycle passing by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., the United States, on May 22, 2020. (Xinhua/Liu Jie)

A man rides bicycle passing by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., the United States, on May 22, 2020. (Xinhua/Liu Jie)

The pandemic offers decision-makers worldwide a chance to bridge those wealth and health gaps through refashioning policies like reordering tax codes, introducing universal health care coverage, and promoting common development through international cooperation in regions like Africa and the Middle East so as to make sure that the dividends of globalization can be shared by all global villagers.

Following the collapse of the U.S. subprime mortgage markets in 2007, shock waves swept financial sectors in all corners of the world, and the most serious financial tsunami since the Great Depression of the 1930s kicked in. Globalization then encountered a major setback. Yet despite all the second-guessing about it at that time, countries worldwide rose to the occasion and jointly steered the global economy through the uncharted waters and back onto the track of recovery.

Buyers talk with an exhibitor at the 126th China Import and Export Fair, also known as the Canton Fair, in Guangzhou, south China‘s Guangdong Province, Oct. 15, 2019. (Xinhua/Deng Hua)

Buyers talk with an exhibitor at the 126th China Import and Export Fair, also known as the Canton Fair, in Guangzhou, south China‘s Guangdong Province, Oct. 15, 2019. (Xinhua/Deng Hua)

“Our fractured world needs agile governance and smarter globalization,” Klaus Schwab, founder and chief executive of the WEF, once said.

The world will never be the same when this pandemic comes to an end, and neither will the process of globalization. The human race has every reason to repeat what they did in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis and work together to help this unstoppable trend take a turn for the better.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Commentary: Post-pandemic world needs better globalization, not less

Published

on

Even at a time when the coronavirus pandemic is sweeping the world, beef from New Zealand, red wine from Chile, and detergent from Germany remain just a click away to Chinese customers.

This offers a glimpse of how globalization has led to the creation of a highly integrated world web of interdependence and altered the way of living in many parts of this closely connected global community.

The ravaging pandemic, however, has jolted global supply chains and halted much of cross-border travels. It has also exposed once again some of globalization’s deep-seated deficiencies, and prompted many in academia, politics and the press to debate whether this marks the beginning of an end to this historic process.

It is not the first time that globalization has been questioned or assaulted in times of turbulence. Between the 2008 global financial crisis and this pandemic, sharp criticism against globalization was heard fueled by rising waves of trade protectionism and economic nationalism.

Nevertheless, being a natural process driven by the combined forces of technological breakthroughs, as well as the free flow of people and profit-thirsty capital, globalization has brought down trade and commerce barries, shrunk production costs, stimulated technological cooperation, integrated global markets and financial systems, created inestimable jobs and wealth, and raised living standards throughout the world over the centuries since the Age of Discovery.

These upsides of globalization are unmistakable, and will not be wiped out by a single global crisis. Arjun Appadurai, a U.S. globalization studies expert, argued in an opinion piece published by the Time magazine earlier this month that “globalization is here to stay,” and de-globalization efforts are no more than “wishful thinking.”

Thus the international community, instead of trying to turn inward and break away from each other, should come even closer and make globalization work better for everyone.

The first task should be for countries worldwide to make global production and supply chains more risk-resilient. This pandemic will not be the last one. Other unknown risks and new challenges are likely to emerge in the future.

While some Washington politicians are talking about reshoring the production of critical medical and technological supplies back to the United States, others like Shannon K. O’Neil, a senior fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations, argued that governments and boardrooms should add redundancies to the global manufacturing processes.

Information technologies have also been considered key to rendering future global supply chains more resilient. The World Economic Forum (WEF) suggested in an article published on its website last month that companies should stop recording data like ships’ cargo on paper, and start digitizing their supply chain processes so as to make sure critical information can always be available.

Whatever the proposals — reshoring, multi-sourcing or digitizing, China, with its comprehensive industrial advantages, will remain a critical part of any future global supply chains.

“I don’t think China‘s role as a major source of manufacturing is going to be eliminated. They will continue to be so,” said Morris Cohen, a professor at The Wharton School, told Deutsche Welle last month.

Secondly, the international community should jointly enhance global economic governance and further boost global free trade.

In mid-April, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) projected that the global economy is on track to contract sharply by 3 percent in 2020 due to COVID-19, probably the worst recession since the Great Depression in the 1930s.

To forestall that nightmare scenario, governments should at the moment better coordinate their macro-economic policies so as to maintain market stability, prop up employment, conduct stimuli proportional to the ongoing pandemic, and restore global growth through such multilateral economic platforms as the Group of 20.

Also, they should give even stronger support to the rules-based multilateral trading system with the World Trade Organization (WTO) at the core. Right now, because of Washington’s intentional obstruction, the WTO’s Appellate Body, which has arbitrated international trade disputes over the past 25 years to ensure fairness, has been left inquorate.

The Financial Times, a British newspaper, argued in a recent editorial that the WTO is needed more than ever so that it can “underpin the open global economy we will all need on the other side of the pandemic.”

The U.S. administration should curb its protectionist impulses, and actively and fully back the existing global economic governance system.

The third front should be strengthening international cooperation so that countries worldwide can better respond to their shared non-conventional security challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Globalization is now far more than just economic integration. As the global village is highly interconnected, the human race needs to ramp up, not to dial down, trans-border cooperation in a bid to jointly tackle common challenges like deadly contagions, climate change, terrorism and cyber attacks, problems no country can solve single-handedly.

The most immediate mission should be stepping up global cooperation against the COVID-19 pandemic and bolster the backbone-role the World Health Organization has been playing in coordinating global endeavor to beat humanity’s common enemy.

The fourth task is to make globalization more inclusive for all. The pandemic has further revealed that globalization has not turned out to be a rising tide lifting all boats, and that it could further widen the global gap between the rich and the poor.

In a WEF research report earlier this month, which focuses on epidemics like H1N1 in 2009, MERS in 2012, and Zika in 2016, and traces out their distributional effects in the five years following each event, the Gini coefficient, a commonly-used index of inequality, has gone up by nearly 1.5 percent on average.

In the United States, the world‘s largest economy, the outbreak recession has kicked millions of the most economically vulnerable Americans out of their jobs, while many are facing a dire choice between protecting their health or their jobs. Also, several racial minority groups account for a disproportionate number of the COVID-19 infections and deaths in the country largely due to lower living and working conditions as well as a lack of access to health care. In Wisconsin alone, a U.S. state with a 6-percent Black population, African Americans account for about half of its outbreak fatalities, according to a recent report by the Washington Post.

The pandemic offers decision-makers worldwide a chance to bridge those wealth and health gaps through refashioning policies like reordering tax codes, introducing universal health care coverage, and promoting common development through international cooperation in regions like Africa and the Middle East so as to make sure that the dividends of globalization can be shared by all global villagers.

Following the collapse of the U.S. subprime mortgage markets in 2007, shock waves swept financial sectors in all corners of the world, and the most serious financial tsunami since the Great Depression of the 1930s kicked in. Globalization then encountered a major setback. Yet despite all the second-guessing about it at that time, countries worldwide rose to the occasion and jointly steered the global economy through the uncharted waters and back onto the track of recovery.

“Our fractured world needs agile governance and smarter globalization,” Klaus Schwab, founder and chief executive of the WEF, once said.

The world will never be the same when this pandemic comes to an end, and neither will the process of globalization. The human race has every reason to repeat what they did in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis and work together to help this unstoppable trend take a turn for the better.

(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Roundup: U.S. states of Colorado, Nevada join Western States Pact to fight COVID-19

Published

on

The U.S. states of Colorado and Nevada on Monday announced they are joining the Western States Pact launched earlier this month by three states on the West Coast, namely Washington, Oregon and California, which banded together to battle the COVID-19 pandemic.

Colorado Governor Jared Polis called the Western States Pact in his statement a working group of Western state governors with a shared vision for modifying stay-at-home orders and fighting COVID-19.

“Coloradans are working together to slow the spread of COVID-19 and have important information to share with and to gain from other states,” Polis said. “I’m thrilled Colorado is joining the Western States Pact.”

“There’s no silver bullet that will solve this pandemic until there is a cure so we must have a multifaceted and bold approach in order to slow the spread of the virus, to keep our people safe and help our economy rebound,” the statement read.

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak made the announcement via Twitter.

“I’m honored to have the State of Nevada join the Western States Pact and believe the sharing of critical information and best practices on how to mitigate the spread, protect the health and safety of our residents, and reopen responsibly will be invaluable as we chart our paths forward,” said Sisolak.

“Millions of visitors from our fellow Western states travel to Nevada every year as a premier tourism destination, and this partnership will be vital to our immediate recovery and long-term economic comeback,” he added.

The pact announced on April 13 indicated that members would coordinate measures to fight the fatal disease and economic consequences under three agreed principles: residents’ health comes first; health outcomes and science, instead of politics, will guide reopening decisions; and states will only be effective by working together.

The pact also outlined four goals: protecting vulnerable populations at risk for severe disease if infected; ensuring an ability to care for those who may become sick with COVID-19 and other conditions; mitigating the non-direct COVID-19 health impacts; and protecting the general public by ensuring any successful lifting of interventions includes the development of a system for testing, tracking and isolating.

The latest moves of Colorado and Nevada were welcomed by the initial members of the pact.

“Today, Colorado and Nevada joined CA, OR, and WA in our Western States Pact. The West Coast is — and will continue to be — guided by SCIENCE. We issued our stay at home orders early to keep the public healthy. We’ll open our economies with that same guiding principle,” California Governor Gavin Newsom tweeted Monday noon.

“In Washington state, our decisions are guided by public health data and science and this is a principle we share up and down the West Coast,” Washington State Governor Jay Inslee said in a statement, adding “the addition of their states will strengthen this regional partnership and save lives.”

The Western States Pact, whose five members are all run by Democratic governors, is not the only one of its kind in the United States.

Northeastern states, including New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, joined forces on April 13 to coordinate how the economy would reopen in those states.

Midwest governors announced a partnership on April 16 to reopen the regional economy. The pact consists of Illinois, Ohio, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Indiana, Kentucky and Michigan.
(XINHUA)

Continue Reading

Sport

Ryder Cup without fans is no Ryder Cup, McIlroy says

Published

on

World number one Rory McIlroy says he will prefer a postponement of this year’s Ryder Cup until 2021 rather than staging it with no fans present due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The golf calendar has been ravaged by the new coronavirus outbreak, with three of the sport’s four majors postponed and the British Open cancelled altogether.

The postponed majors are the Masters, U.S. Open and PGA Championship.

The 2020 Ryder Cup is scheduled to take place from Sept. 25 to Sept. 27 at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin but there are doubts that it can go ahead as planned.

McIlroy said the absence of spectators would ruin the spectacle of the biennial Europe vs United States event, which the Europeans won in Paris in 2018.

“I get the financial implications for everyone involved,” McIlroy said during an Instagram live talk with equipment company TaylorMade.

“There’s a lot that goes into putting on the Ryder Cup that people don’t appreciate, but having a Ryder Cup without fans is not a Ryder Cup.

“It wouldn’t be a great spectacle. There’d be no atmosphere. So, if it came to whether they had to choose between not playing the event or playing it without fans, I would say just delay it a year and play it in 2021.

“Obviously it would be better for the Europeans to play without fans because we wouldn’t have to deal with some of the stuff you have to put up with, but at the same time it’s not a Ryder Cup,” McIlroy added.

“If they do delay it until 2021, the next Ryder Cup is in Italy, and we know how badly Italy was affected by coronavirus. So, it gives them an extra year to prepare for the event in 2023.”
OLAL

(
Edited By: Olawale Alabi) (NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Nigeria consulate suspends emergency passport services

Published

on

The Consulate General of Nigeria in New York has suspended emergency passport services due to shortage of old booklets.

In a notice dated March 6, 2020, the consulate said that only applicants on appointment would be attended to in the time being.

“The Consulate General will resume attending to all and sundry when the passport booklet supply improves,” the notice said.

The shortage, according to the Consul General, Mr Benaoyagha Okoyen, is occasioned by gradual phaseout of the old passport and transition to the

new 10 year enhanced E-Passport.

Okoyen gave the explanation while addressing a group of emergency passport applicants in his office in New York.

The applicants, who had showed up at the consulate before their respective interview dates, said they had no prior knowledge of the new policy.

Some became agitated after consular officials refused to attend to them for fear of flouting the policy.

Attempts at explanation fell on deaf ears as some said they came from far states, and could not afford the cost of putting up in New York.

On arrival at the premises, Okoyen took them to his office where he took time to explain the situation.

“There is a transition going on from the five-year to the 10-year validity passport, and we are trying to manage the old stock.

“We hope the transition process is completed soon, and once that is done this issue will be over.

“Currently, we only have limited number of booklets, which have been allocated according to our scheduled appointments,” he said.

The Nigeria News Agency learnt that some of the applicants, most of whom were seeking renewal of their passports, came from other consular jurisdictions.

Besides New York, Nigeria has two other consulates in the United States located in Atlanta and Washington, serving allotted numbers of the country’s 50 states.

There are 20 states under the New York consular jurisdiction, including Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire and New Jersey,

Others are New York, Nebraska, Ohio, North Dakota, South Dakota, Rhode Island, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Vermont and Pennsylvania.

NAN also gathered that many of the applicants addressed by the Consul General were involved in fire-brigade approach as their passports expired long ago.

Okoyen complained about this attitude in an interview with NAN last August.

“Passports are supposed to be renewed six months before expiration, but most applicants come here within a few days to their travel dates or whatever they want to use the document for.

“We work here according to plans, and since we cannot reject them, we have to go out of our way to accommodate them.

“This is what results in the shortage of materials and systems breakdown experienced here sometimes.

“Yet, most applicants refuse to understand and cooperate with us, and they feel they can just vent their anger any time,” he said.

Edited By: Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Trump talks up killing, insults Soleimani at campaign rally 

Published

on

U.S. President Donald Trump has called Qassem Soleimani a “son of a bitch” in his latest round of fierce criticism of the Iranian general he had assassinated earlier this month.

Trump told a rally in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on Tuesday that there were many “young men and women walking around with out arms and without legs” because of Soleimani.

“Great percentages of people don’t have legs right now and arms because of this son of a bitch,” Trump said, adding that “he should have been killed 20 years ago.”

Trump was this week forced to defend the targeted killing of Soleimani after critics questioned the “imminent” nature of the threat the president said justified the move.

Washington credits the general with orchestrating the killing of hundreds of U.S. soldiers in Iraq.

Trump’s administration has also been criticized over conflicting statements on the rationale behind the killing. Defence Secretary Mark Esper on Sunday said he never saw evidence that Iran was planning an attack on four U.S. embassies, as Trump had claimed two days earlier.

Republicans have used the strike on Soleimani to defend Trump as taking action against enemies while Democrats try to remove him from office as impeachment proceedings move forward.

Iran retaliated against the Soleimani attack by firing ballistic missiles at an Iraqi base housing U.S. forces.

No one was harmed in the strike and Trump has since ordered additional sanctions on Iran, instead of striking back, in what has been taken as a de-escalation of tensions.

YEE

Edited by: Emmanuel Yashim

Continue Reading

General news

Inmates of correctional facilities in Enugu receive gift items from churches

Published

on

Inmates of correctional facilities Enugu, Nsukka and Oji in Enugu State received various gift items from different churches to mark the yuletide in the state.

Mr Monday Chukwuemeka, the Public Relations Officer of the Enugu Command of the Nigeria Correctional Service, made the disclosure in a statement in Enugu on Monday.

Chukwuemeka said that Rev. Afam Ikanih, Chaplain, Milwaukee County House of Correction, Franklin Wisconsin, U.S., donated 15 computers, clothes as well as shoes.

He said that the chaplain washed the feet of the inmates in the three correctional centres.

Also, the Anglican Communion led by the Archbishop Ecclesiastical Province, Most Rev. Emmanuel Chukwuma, fed the inmates for one week while sharing with them the message of God’s love.

The Catholic Diocese under the leadership of His Lordship, Most Rev. Callistus Onaga the Bishop of Enugu Diocese, celebrated Christmas mass at the Chapel of the Enugu Correctional Centre.

The spokesman said that the bishop was accompanied by Rev. Fr. Ambrose Ekeoroku, the Executive Director of the Catholic Prisoners Interest Organisation (CAPIO).

He said that they presented food and gift items to the inmates and emphasised the need for them to rededicate themselves to God and embrace a new life.

Chukwuemeka said that the Controller of Enugu Correctional Centre, Mr J. C. Emelue, received the items and thanked the churches for their kind gesture.

Emelue promised to utilise the computers judiciously for effective running of the correctional facilities in the state and added that the inmates had never had it so good.

Edited by: Ejike Obeta/Grace Yussuf
(NAN)

 

Continue Reading

Foreign

Bloomberg has ‘lot of money to spend, so do we,’ – Trump campaign team

Published

on

Michael Bloomberg’s spending in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Bloomberg has spent more than 100 million dollars of his own money on advertising and voter registration efforts for a relatively late entry in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Bloomberg.

He has declined to publicly attack the media mogul and philanthropist since the Democrat launched his White House bid last month.

The president has not mentioned Bloomberg at rallies, where he regularly derides Democratic presidential candidates Pete Buttigieg with zeal.

That amount does not include other campaign spending such as on staff, travel and offices since Bloomberg entered the race in November after saying earlier in the year that he would not compete in 2020.

“At this point in the game, I don’t know that you recover from that. He hasn’t been in any debates, people haven’t really heard much from him.

“While he does have a lot of money to spend, so do we.

“We have a ton of money at the Trump campaign,” said Lara Trump, a senior adviser to the president’s reelection campaign and his daughter-in-law.

The Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign raised a combined 125 million dollars in the third quarter of 2019.

Bloomberg’s fundraising will not be revealed until next week, when every presidential candidate is required to file a year-end report.

However, the candidate has said he will reject all political donations and will self-fund his entire campaign.

The former Donald Trump taunted in 2016 as not having “the guts to run for president” – currently has a net worth of 55.9 billion dollars.

According to Forbes, Bloomberg is the eighth wealthiest American. Donald Trump ranks 275th on the list with a projected net worth of 3.7 billion dollars.

Republicans close to the national party told McClatchy that when Bloomberg was preparing to enter the race they worried the self-made billionaire would get under Trump’s skin.

But Mike Bloomberg.”

Bloomberg spokesman Michael Frazier, in an email to McClatchy, responded, “The Trump campaign has a funny way of showing they aren’t thinking about Mike.

“Maybe they can explain why they’ve criticised each of our office openings in battleground states, or why their campaign manager banned Bloomberg News from their events?”

After Bloomberg entered the race, the Trump campaign said it would no longer give credentials to reporters who work for Bloomberg News, although none of them have been prevented from attending his rallies so far.

While Trump may privately be bothered by the rival billionaire, he has barely let it show in public.

The president has mentioned Bloomberg once on Twitter, calling him “New Yorker announced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination.

Trump has acknowledged Bloomberg just two other times during the same time frame in retweets of others’ comments.

In a recent interview Trump only referred to Bloomberg to compare him unfavorably to New York City mayor who currently serves as the president’s personal attorney.

Trump responded to a question about Bloomberg’s bid for the Nov. 8.

“He doesn’t have the magic to do well.

“Little Michael will fail. He’ll spend a lot of money.

“He’s got some really big issues, he’s got some personal problems, and he’s got a lot of other problems,” Trump said.

Money isn’t one of them, as Trump himself acknowledged.

Bloomberg’s billions have allowed him to invest early in states in the upper Midwest that will be crucial in next year’s general election.

He is not competing in four states that have traditionally shaped the Democratic primary.

The states that Bloomberg is targeting were intended to form a “Blue Wall” that would prevent Trump from winning the 2016 presidential election.

Trump carried three – Marco Rubio, shows Trump with an edge in those three states.

Trump campaign officials say they are building up their operation in 17 states, including the Midwest, to fend off any Democrat who wins the party’s nomination.

One official, at a Pennsylvania.

Bloomberg’s campaign told McClatchy in December that the candidate plans to open 13 offices in Wisconsin. He says he will keep offices in those states open until next November, irrespective of whether he becomes the Democratic nominee for president.

“Somebody said to me the other day that you’re spending a lot of money.

“And I said, ‘yes, I’m making an investment in replacing Milwaukee on Saturday.

Lara Trump, who is married to the president’s son Eric, told McClatchy that Bloomberg does not have widespread name recognition and campaign advertising dollars generate a finite amount of voter enthusiasm.

“Yeah, he’s a very wealthy guy, he can spend a lot of money, but I don’t think a lot of people around this country quite frankly know Michael Bloomberg very well,” she added.

Bloomberg has not charted double-digit support in any national surveys, but he has consistently polled in fifth place behind Pete Buttigieg.

He polls at 4.9 per cent nationally on average.

Lara Trump said she doesn’t see Bloomberg catching up.

The candidates attracting the most combined support in the Democratic field are Warren and Sanders, both of whom are shunning the ultra-wealthy and have focused their campaign fundraising on grassroots donations.

“Those are the people that seem to have a lot of momentum behind them.

“I don’t see him getting that energy,”  

YEE

Edited by: Emmanuel Yashim
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Health

Bekker, 4 others appointed co-chairs for HIVR4P 2020

Published

on

Bekker, 4 others appointed co-chairs for HIVR4P 2020

Appointment

Ibadan, Feb. 21, 2019(NNN)The International AIDS Society (IAS) has appointed  five leaders in HIV prevention research, implementation and advocacy as Co-Chairs for the HIV Research for Prevention (HIVR4P) conference.

This is contained in a statement signed by Mandy Sugrue, IAS Communications Director and made available to the News Agency of Nigeria(NNN) on Thursday.

The five include Linda-Gail Bekker, Pontiano Kaleebu, Sheena McCormack, David O’Connor and Mitchell Warren.

NNN reports that the HIVR4P conference is the world’s only scientific meeting dedicated exclusively to biomedical HIV prevention.

Sugrue said that the newly appointed leaders would co-chair the fourth biennial HIVR4P 2020 conference scheduled to hold in Cape Town, South Africa.

He quoted Anton Pozniak, IAS president, as saying the IAS has assumed the role of HIVR4P conference secretariat as part of its collaboration with the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise, which organised the first three HIVR4P conferences.

“Since 2014, the biennial HIVR4P conference has brought together leaders in every field of biomedical HIV prevention from vaccines to PrEP to emerging, long-acting strategies.

“The gathering aims at addressing both cross-cutting challenges in the field as well as the research, policy and implementation issues specific to each prevention approach,” IAS President said.

Pozniak said with the outstanding Co-Chairs, HIVR4P 2020 would continue to be one of the most innovative, integrated and collaborative conferences in the field.

Also, Kevin Osborne, IAS Executive Director, said IAS is excited to take on the role of secretariat for HIVR4P 2020 at this critical moment in HIV prevention research and implementation.

“These co-chairs represent expertise across prevention research, science, and community that will advance the evidence-informed, human rights-based approaches that can help make the enormous promise of biomedical HIV prevention available to all,” Osborne said.

Bekker, a former IAS president is Deputy Director, Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town and Chief Operating Officer of the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation.

Kaleebu, a Director, Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI) is also the Director of Medical Research Council (MRC)/UVRI London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Uganda Research Unit.

O’Connor is a Medical Foundation Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Chair, Global Infectious Diseases division, Wisconsin National Primate Research Center.

McCormack is Senior Clinical Scientist, MRC Clinical Trials Unit at University College London, while Warren is Executive Director of AVAC, Global Advocacy for HIV Prevention.

Sugrue said that the appointed co-chairs would guide the development of HIVR4P 2020 conference scheduled to hold from Oct. 11 to 15, 2020. (NNN)

TAA/KTO/IFY

Edited by Kamal Tayo Oropo/Ifeyinwa Omowole

 

08079517573
alakime1804@gmail.com

Continue Reading

Foreign

Scientists call for action to save Antarctic ice sheet

Published

on

The Antarctic ice sheets are under threat, a new research on Tuesday led by New Zealand and U.S. scientists who call for concrete action to cut greenhouse gas emissions, revealed in a report.

 

The study underscored just how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate change, according to Richard Levy of GNS Science and Victoria University of Wellington and Stephen Meyers of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who jointly led the research team.

 

“We’ve long known that the way the Earth moves in space influences climate.

“If we fail to reach emissions targets, the Earth’s average temperature will warm more than two degrees, sea ice will diminish.

 

“We will jump back to a world that hasn’t existed for millions of years,’’ Levy added.

 

The research confirms a connection between those astronomical changes and changes in the size and extent of the Antarctic ice sheets.

 

“It highlights that parts of the ice sheets that sit in the ocean are particularly sensitive to changes in the tilt of our planets axis,” Levy said.

 

He said that it also raised serious questions about how these changes would affect Earth in the future as carbon emissions rise.

 

“Antarctica’s vulnerable marine-based ice sheets will feel the effect of our current relatively high tilt, and ocean warming at Antarctica’s margins will be amplified,’’ he said.

The study’s co-author Tim Naish of the Antarctic Research Centre at Victoria University of Wellington has also added that urgent action is needed on cutting emissions, and it needs to happen on a national and global level.

Edited by: Abiodun Oluleye/Grace Yussuf
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Control of Congress at stake as Americans vote in mid-term election

Published

on

After a divisive campaign marked by fierce clashes over race, immigration and other cultural issues, Americans began voting   on Tuesday.

 

The election is to determine the balance of power in the U.S. Congress and shape the future of Donald Trump’s presidency.

 

The first national election since Trump captured the White House in a stunning 2016 upset is generally seen as a referendum on the Republican president and his policies.

 

“Everything we have achieved is at stake tomorrow,” Trump told supporters on Monday night in Fort Wayne, Indiana, at one of his three rallies to stoke turnout on the last day before the election.

 

All 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, 35 U.S. Senate seats and 36 governorships are up for grabs on Tuesday in elections focused on dozens of competitive races from coast to coast that opinion polls show could go either way.

 

Democrats are bidding to pick up the minimum of 23 House seats they need for a majority, which would enable them to stymie Trump’s legislative agenda.

 

Republicans are expected to retain their slight majority in the U.S. Senate, currently at two seats, which would let them retain the power to approve U.S. Supreme Court and other judicial nominations on straight party-line votes.

 

But at least 64 House races remain competitive, according to a Reuters analysis of the three top nonpartisan forecasters, and Senate control was expected to come down to a half dozen close contests in Arizona, Nevada, Missouri, North Dakota, Indiana and Florida.

 

Democrats also threaten to recapture governor’s offices in several battleground states such as Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania, a potential help for the party in those states in the 2020 presidential race.

 

During a whirlwind six-day blitz to wrap up the campaign, Trump repeatedly raised fears about immigrants, issuing harsh warnings about a caravan of Central American migrants moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border.

Edited by: David Onilede/Donald Ugwu
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

75-year-old cat lover goes viral online for napping with cats

Published

on

Terry Laurmen, 75, has never thought he would become an online sensation by napping with shelter cats.

The photo of him sleeping with cats in various positions at a pet shelter in Wisconsin has gone viral on the internet and helped the shelter raise over 30,000 dollars.

Terry became a regular volunteer at the Safe Haven Pet Sanctuary about six months ago.

“He just came along one day to the shelter and introduced himself, he said he would like to brush cats, eventually it became everyday.

“They all know him, when he walks through the door they run over to him because they know he has the special brush and special treats.

“They all pile on top of him and rub all over him and just love him,’’ sanctuary owner Elizabeth told the BBC.

But grooming 20 to 30 cats can get exhausting, and the staff began snapping shots of Terry taking his daily siestas with his furry friends and shared some of them on the shelter’s facebook page.

Unexpectedly, the post became a hit, and has been shared across the world for over 23,000 times.

Thousands of well-wishers have shared comments and pledged thousands of dollars to the shelter in donations.

The retired Spanish teacher, with no mobile phone or computer, still can not get his head around his newfound online fame.

However he said he would do anything to raise money for the shelter.

Edited by: Abiodun Oluleye/Silas Nwoha
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

North Dakota tornado kills newborn child, dozens

Published

on

 A tornado killed a seven-day-old baby and injured more than two dozen people when it ripped through a trailer park in North Dakota and forecasters warned that parts of the Midwestern United States could face more twisters on Wednesday.

 

The tornado, with wind speeds around 127 miles per hour (204 kph), hit a trailer home park on Tuesday in the southwest part of Watford City, North Dakota, about 180 miles (290 km) northwest of Bismarck, destroying many mobile homes, the National Weather Service said.

 

A male baby was severely injured when the storm hit his family’s home and later died in hospital, the McKenzie County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement late on Tuesday. The office did not identify the baby.

 

NWS weather forecaster Marc Chenard warned that tornadoes could hit portions of central and northern Minnesota and portions of western Wisconsin on Wednesday.

 

“There’s a threat of a few tornadoes and potential of large hail and a threat of flash flooding for the same areas mainly from this evening into early Thursday,” Chenard said.

 

About 28 trailer park residents were also injured when the storm hit Watford City. They were taken to McKenzie County Hospital, with at least three being transported by aircraft and six listed in critical condition, the sheriff’s office said in a statement.

 

A representative from the McKenzie County Sheriff’s office did not immediately respond to requests for comment on Wednesday.

 

Severe wind threats will shift south by Thursday and threats of storms will then impact portions of southern Minnesota, northern Iowa and central Wisconsin. Chenard said that the storm has moved out of the North Dakota area.

 

North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum visited Watford City on Tuesday to survey areas hit by the tornado. He met with local officials.

 

People who were displaced by the storm and were staying in local shelters, the governor’s office said in a statement.

 

The NWS rated the North Dakota tornado an EF-2, the second-strongest on the five-step Enhanced Fujita scale.

Edited by: Udochukwu Ifionu/Felix Ajide
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Trump orders flags at half-mast to honour newsroom shooting victims

Published

on

U.S. President Donald Trump has ordered American flags to be flown at half-staff in honour of the five people gunned down on June 29 inside Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Maryland.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said the decision was reached Monday night “as soon as the president heard about the request from the mayor”.

Sanders said: “Last night, as soon as the president heard about the request from the mayor, he ordered the flags to be lowered.

“I spoke with the mayor last night and again this morning to let him know the president’s decision.”

The White House also released an official proclamation signed by Trump on Tuesday, which ordered American flags to be lowered until sunset at all public buildings and military posts.

“Our nation shares the sorrow of those affected by the shooting at the Capital Gazette newspaper,” Trump said in the proclamation.

The move followed a request by Annapolis Mayor Gavin Buckley, who claimed that his request on Monday was initially denied.

Buckley had said: “This was an attack on the press. It was an attack on freedom of speech. It’s just as important as any other tragedy”.

“Obviously, I’m disappointed, you know? Is there a cutoff for tragedy?” Buckley said earlier.

On Monday, Buckley said that while the State of Maryland had ordered flags lowered in honour of those killed at the Capital Gazette, Trump declined the bid for federal recognition.

The White House also had lowered flags for other mass shootings, including the 17 killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in February, and the 10 cut down in May at Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas.

Five people were killed and several others injured on June 28 after a gunman opened fire inside the building that houses the Capital Gazette.

Trump said in a tweet on the shooting: “Prior to departing Wisconsin, I was briefed on the shooting at Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Maryland.

“My thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Thank you to all of the First Responders who are currently on the scene”.

Edited by: Sadiya Hamza
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Foreign

Trump orders flags at half-mast to honour newsroom shooting victims

Published

on

U.S. President Donald Trump has ordered American flags to be flown at half-staff in honour of the five people gunned down on June 29 inside Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Maryland.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said the decision was reached Monday night “as soon as the president heard about the request from the mayor”.

Sanders said: “Last night, as soon as the president heard about the request from the mayor, he ordered the flags to be lowered.

“I spoke with the mayor last night and again this morning to let him know the president’s decision.”

The White House also released an official proclamation signed by Trump on Tuesday, which ordered American flags to be lowered until sunset at all public buildings and military posts.

“Our nation shares the sorrow of those affected by the shooting at the Capital Gazette newspaper,” Trump said in the proclamation.

The move followed a request by Annapolis Mayor Gavin Buckley, who claimed that his request on Monday was initially denied.

Buckley had said: “This was an attack on the press. It was an attack on freedom of speech. It’s just as important as any other tragedy”.

“Obviously, I’m disappointed, you know? Is there a cutoff for tragedy?” Buckley said earlier.

On Monday, Buckley said that while the State of Maryland had ordered flags lowered in honour of those killed at the Capital Gazette, Trump declined the bid for federal recognition.

The White House also had lowered flags for other mass shootings, including the 17 killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in February, and the 10 cut down in May at Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas.

Five people were killed and several others injured on June 28 after a gunman opened fire inside the building that houses the Capital Gazette.

Trump said in a tweet on the shooting: “Prior to departing Wisconsin, I was briefed on the shooting at Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Maryland.

“My thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Thank you to all of the First Responders who are currently on the scene”.

Edited by: Sadiya Hamza
(NAN)

Continue Reading

Contact US: editor @nnn.com.ng, nnnnews247 @gmail.com

Latest News